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🏆 World Cup (2019)

  PARTICIPANTS (sorted by highest achieved rating; click on name to see player's games)
Levon Aronian, Wesley So, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Hikaru Nakamura, Ding Liren, Alexander Grischuk, Anish Giri, Teimour Radjabov, Sergey Karjakin, Boris Gelfand, Peter Svidler, Ruslan Ponomariov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Ian Nepomniachtchi, Pentala Harikrishna, Yu Yangyi, Michael Adams, Dmitry Jakovenko, Evgeny Tomashevsky, Wei Yi, Wang Hao, David Navara, Sergei Movsesian, Radoslaw Wojtaszek, Nikita Vitiugov, Evgeny Ilgizovich Bareev, Le Quang Liem, Maxim Matlakov, Jan-Krzysztof Duda, Arkadij Naiditsch, Dmitry Andreikin, Vladimir Fedoseev, Ernesto Inarkiev, Bu Xiangzhi, Samuel Shankland, Anton Korobov, Vidit Santosh Gujrathi, Rustam Kasimdzhanov, Ivan Cheparinov, Luke McShane, Maxim Rodshtein, Liviu Dieter Nisipeanu, Evgeny Najer, Ferenc Berkes, Igor Viktorovich Kovalenko, Vladislav Artemiev, Bassem Amin, Igor Lysyj, Daniil Dubov, Eltaj Safarli, Tamir Nabaty, Ivan Saric, Baskaran Adhiban, Aleksej Gennadyevich Aleksandrov, Anton Demchenko, David Anton Guijarro, Mateusz Bartel, Aleksandr Rakhmanov, Gawain Jones, Jeffery Xiong, Sanan Sjugirov, Eduardo Patricio Iturrizaga Bonelli, Surya Shekhar Ganguly, Nils Grandelius, Abhijeet Gupta, Kacper Piorun, Jorge Cori, Sandro Mareco, Arman Pashikian, Ngoc Truongson Nguyen, Sethuraman P Sethuraman, Constantin Lupulescu, Emilio Cordova, Mircea-Emilian Parligras, Lu Shanglei, Ahmed Adly, Benjamin Bok, Robert Hovhannisyan, Parham Maghsoodloo, Ehsan Ghaem Maghami, Neuris Delgado Ramirez, Kirill Alekseenko, Benjamin Gledura, Rinat Jumabayev, Diego Flores, Grigoriy Oparin, Samuel Sevian, Nijat Abasov, Murali Karthikeyan, Chithambaram V R Aravindh, Aryan Tari, Alexandr Predke, M Amin Tabatabaei, Niclas Huschenbeth, Andrey Esipenko, Nikita Petrov, Krikor Sevag Mekhitarian, Alexey Sarana, Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan plus 28 more players.

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
World Cup (2019)

The 2019 FIDE World Cup is taking place in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia from 10 September to 4 October. The 128-player knockout tournament features most of the world's best players. The total prize fund is $1.6 million, with $110,000 for the winner and $6,000 for first round losers. The finalists will qualify for the World Championship Candidates (2020) tournament that determines Magnus Carlsen's next World Championship challenger.

The format is six knockout rounds of 2-game classical matches before a 4-game final. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves, then 30 minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1. If the score is tied the players then play two 25-minute + 10-second increment rapid games, then two 10+10 games, then two 5+3 and, finally, Armageddon, where White has 5 minutes to Black's 4 but a draw qualifies Black for the next round. (1)

Official site: https://khantymansiysk2019.fide.com/

Previous edition: World Cup (2017)

(1) chess24 https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...

 page 2 of 16; games 26-50 of 379  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
26. Bareev vs Kasimdzhanov  ½-½322019World CupA22 English
27. Naiditsch vs N Huschenbeth 0-1402019World CupE04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
28. S L Narayanan vs D Anton Guijarro  1-0562019World CupC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
29. A Korobov vs A Gupta  ½-½622019World CupD80 Grunfeld
30. N Delgado Ramirez vs McShane  ½-½312019World CupC67 Ruy Lopez
31. E Inarkiev vs M Karthikeyan  1-0422019World CupE97 King's Indian
32. M Bartel vs M Rodshtein  ½-½342019World CupD12 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
33. J Cori vs Sarin Nihal 0-1292019World CupA13 English
34. Lu Shanglei vs Gelfand  ½-½262019World CupC46 Three Knights
35. Adams vs C Aravindh  ½-½312019World CupC50 Giuoco Piano
36. A Rakhmanov vs N Grandelius 1-0562019World CupA30 English, Symmetrical
37. A Esipenko vs Ponomariov  ½-½302019World CupE67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
38. T Nabaty vs S P Sethuraman  0-1382019World CupB22 Sicilian, Alapin
39. K Piorun vs N Abasov  ½-½312019World CupB30 Sicilian
40. B Bok vs I Saric  ½-½302019World CupE94 King's Indian, Orthodox
41. S Sjugirov vs S Mareco  ½-½342019World CupE15 Queen's Indian
42. A Adly vs I Cheparinov  ½-½552019World CupE60 King's Indian Defense
43. B Adhiban vs E Iturrizaga  ½-½362019World CupE46 Nimzo-Indian
44. A Tari vs S Sevian  ½-½392019World CupA06 Reti Opening
45. Nisipeanu vs M Parligras  ½-½412019World CupC45 Scotch Game
46. R Jumabayev vs F Berkes  1-0482019World CupE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
47. K Alekseenko vs Ngoc Truongson Nguyen  1-0492019World CupC53 Giuoco Piano
48. Ganguly vs V Fedoseev 1-0572019World CupA13 English
49. G Jones vs D Flores  ½-½552019World CupC72 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense, 5.O-O
50. K Piorun vs N Abasov  0-1752019World CupB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
 page 2 of 16; games 26-50 of 379  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 18 OF 18 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-20-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

It is the average ratings over a period of time and here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World...

It clearly shows Giri will get the spot if Ding qualifies unless Giri has some kind of rating disaster.

Last candidates a player who qualified by rating, Caruana went all the way. Will history repeat and it's Carlsen v Giri.

***

Sep-20-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

MVL - Carlsen would be good but that would mean MVL playing 14 games in the candidates without having two or three imaginative whoopsies where he tries to get the computer to go 3 negative digits in the red just for the hell of it.

If the W.C. match is held in Monaco MVL might get the Wild Card if he does not qualify.

***

Sep-20-19  nok: <I wonder what kind of World Championship cycle it would take to trigger a kibitzing apocalypse here?

Maybe that would involve a "win by two" clause in favor of the champion,>

If someone wins the candidates by two points, I have no problem declaring him champion immediately.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  amadeus: <Sally Simpson: ***
It is the average ratings over a period of time and here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World... It clearly shows Giri will get the spot if Ding qualifies unless Giri has some kind of rating disaster. >

A longer list...

Standard Rating Lists, Feb. 2019 Sep. 2019

Sum (02-09/19) : Player (average points 02-09/2019)

22901: Carlsen (2862,63 avg.) - wch
22559: Caruana (2819,88 avg.) - already qualified

22471: Ding Liren (2808,88 avg.)
22295: Anish Giri (2786,88 avg.)
22224: Mamedyarov (2778 avg.)
22214: Vachier-Lagrave (2776,75 avg.)
22188: Nepomniachtchi (2773,5 avg.)
22158: Anand (2769,75 avg.)
22144: Grischuk (2768 avg.)
22103: Wesley So (2762,875 avg.)
22084: Aronian (2760,5 avg.)
22061: Radjabov (2757,63 avg.)
22024: Kramnik (2753 avg.)
22013: Dominguez (2751,63 avg.)
22007: Karjakin (2750,88 avg.)
22004: Yu Yangyi (2750,5 avg.)
21998: Nakamura (2749,75 avg.)

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Thanks amadeus,

Much clearer and things will be even more clearer after the World Cup and the I.O.M. swiss.

***

Sep-21-19  Absentee: <AylerKupp: Did you consider that perhaps the farce is not the ratings system per se but the fact that FIDE selects one of its participants for the Candidates on the basis of highest <average> rating for a one year period? For 2020 it's between the Feb-2019 and Jan-2020 rating lists. It's been shown that the player with the highest rating in the early portion of the average rating calculation period has an unfair advantage over the other possible Candidates Tournament participants because a high rating at the beginning of the average rating calculation period affects the average rating calculation more favorably than a high rating at the end of the average rating calculation period.>

Of course it does. Being able to <maintain>, not just achieve, a higher rating throughout the year weighs naturally more than getting a rating spike at the end. Consistency is rewarded; I don't see what's unfair about it. There are reasons to object to parts of the qualification process, but this really isn't one of them.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<devere> If Ding qualifies at World Cup, Giri is a lock for the ratings qualification spot.>

You're absolutely right, I made it look a lot easier than it actually is and for the reason you said. But it's not beyond the realm of possibility. There are still 5 events in the remaining 4 months of 2019; the Grand Swiss and European Club Cup in October, the Grand Prix Hamburg in November, the Grand Chess Tour Final/London Chess Classic in Nov/Dec, and the Grand Prix Tel Aviv in Dec that could affect the final average ratings for 2019.

Based on the unofficial Live Chess 2700 ratings, Giri's and Mamedyarov's live ratings, which will likely be the ratings that will appear in the Oct-2019 FIDE ratings list are 2776 and 2772 respectively. If neither player plays in any events for the remainder of the year (they have both already met the minimum number of games to be played in 2019 and the last 6 months of 2019 to qualify). Giri wins the average ratings calculation race, 2783.25 to 2776.00. So Mamedyarov <must> play in some of these events in order to have a chance to overtake Giri in the average ratings calculation race.

I wasn't able to find Giri's or Mamedyarov's schedule (I didn't try very hard) but assuming that at least Mamedyarov plays in some of these 5 events, we have some theoretical (and hopefully not totally unreasonable) possibilities for Mamedyarov to overtake Giri in the average ratings calculation race:

1. Giri does not play in any events for the remainder of the year since, with a lead in the average ratings calculation, the simplest way is to not play and maintain your lead. Mamdeyarov would have to play in 2 events in Oct and Dec and win 22 points in each in order to edge Giri in the average ratings calculation, 2783.33 to 2783.25. Or Mamdeyarov could have to play in 3 events, one each in Oct, Nov, and Dec and win 15 points in each in order to edge Giri in the average ratings calculation, 2783.50 to 2783.25.

2 .Giri plays in 1 event in Oct and loses 40 rating points. Mamedyarov plays in 2 events in Oct and Dec and wins 12 rating points in each. Mamedyarov edges Giri in the average ratings calculation, 2780.67 to 2779.92.

3. Giri plays in 2 events in Oct and Dec and loses 12 rating points in each. Mamedyarov also plays in 2 events in Oct and Dec and wins 11 rating points in each. Mamedyarov edges Giri in the average ratings calculation, 2779.67 to 2779.25.

4. Giri plays in 1 event in Dec and loses 10 rating points in each. Mamedyarov plays in 2 events in Oct and Dec and wins 20 rating points in each. Mamedyarov edges Giri in the average ratings calculation, 2782.67 to 2782.67.

Of course there are many other possibilities but none of these are bloody likely so the advantage is obviously with Giri. But to call him a lock at this point? Probably, but maybe not. We'll just have to wait and see.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <beatgiant:

Maybe that would involve a "win by two" clause in favor of the champion>

Would the organizers fund a 300 game match?

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<nok> If someone wins the candidates by two points, I have no problem declaring him champion immediately.>

Without bothering to have a WCC match against Carlsen? You might have no problem but I suspect that the majority of the world's chess enthusiasts would.

Your anti-Carlsen bias is reaching ridiculous extremes. Why would anyone bother to pay any attention to any of your Carlsen-related posts?

Hey, I have an idea. Maybe <chessgames.com> could enhance their ignore list to not only include the name of the poster but allow the specification of keywords that would cause the post to be ignored if it's from a specified poster and addresses one or more of the specified keywords. In your case it would be something like user:nok Carlsen.

Now I would never take advantage of such a feature since it would deprive me of a lot of possibilities to laugh at, but others might. I can easily see someone specified something like user:AylerKupp ratings, shorts, dress code, wine, food, engine, candidates, ... to at least give me the benefit of the doubt. Maybe <chessgames.com> will give me a break and limit the number of keywords to some relatively low number! But, if they do, there will probably be many who would request that the limit be raised. And, of course, anyone will have the chance to specify something like user:AylerKupp * to ignore all my posts.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: < WorstPlayerEver:

PS for the people who don't 'understand' what chess has to do with politics.. tell me when the last Germans were world champion and.. where did they go? Oh wait.. it must be a coincedence! ;)>

Did you notice Wolfgang Uhlmann played the French defense?

What's up with that?

Why didn't he play the Berlin???

Sep-21-19  belgradegambit: Wow Xiong beat Duda and Dominguez beat Grischuck to force playoffs in both matches. Tomorrow will be exciting.
Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: I am surprised to see players fight on for many moves from clearly lost positions in Game Ones of these mini-matches.

I can see not resigning in a Game Two (or Four or Six...) where the only other option is losing the match, but I would think in a Game One wouldn't it be better to save energy and rest up for the next day's game?

Sep-21-19  devere: <Absentee: Being able to <maintain>, not just achieve, a higher rating throughout the year weighs naturally more than getting a rating spike at the end. Consistency is rewarded; I don't see what's unfair about it. There are reasons to object to parts of the qualification process, but this really isn't one of them.>

Rating is not a judgment by the goddess Caissa, it is a statistical summary of all the games you have won, lost and drawn. The simplest way to maintain a high rating is to be inactive. Perhaps a medically induced coma might assist players with a high rating to avoid the temptation of playing chess and possibly losing rating points? Is that the sort of "consistency" you are looking for? Of course I am exaggerating a bit for rhetorical effect, and there are some FIDE minimum play requirements for candidates tournament qualification. The fact remains that a game won or lost during January 2019 counts 12 times as much for average rating qualification as a game won or lost during December 2019. That is absurd, and is the antithesis of real sport.

Sep-21-19  JohnBoy: I am delighted by Xiong's fighting nature. The kid skates awfully close to the edge.
Sep-21-19  nok: <<If someone wins the candidates by two points, I have no problem declaring him champion immediately.> Without bothering to have a WCC match against Carlsen? You might have no problem but I suspect that the majority of the world's chess enthusiasts would. Your anti-Carlsen bias is reaching ridiculous extremes.>

Don't get me wrong. If such a rule was implemented, I'd allow Carlsen to take part in the tournament so he potentially benefits, too.

Sep-21-19  Absentee: <devere: Rating is not a judgment by the goddess Caissa, it is a statistical summary of all the games you have won, lost and drawn. The simplest way to maintain a high rating is to be inactive. Perhaps a medically induced coma might assist players with a high rating to avoid the temptation of playing chess and possibly losing rating points? Is that the sort of "consistency" you are looking for?>

To be able to qualify you need to play a minimum number of games during the averaged period. You can't just sit on your rating.

Sep-21-19  devere: Nice wins by Xiong, who outplayed Duda from start to finish, and Dominguez, who beat Grischuk with a fiendish positional trap:


click for larger view

Black to play would stand slightly better after 28...h3, but after 28...Nxg2?! 29.Kh1!! he was lost! The opening of lines for White's pieces far exceeded the value of the lost pawn.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <devere: The fact remains that a game won or lost during January 2019 counts 12 times as much for average rating qualification as a game won or lost during December 2019. That is absurd, and is the antithesis of real sport.>

That is just not correct. The effect of the won or lost game in January will be watered down during the period given that the regulations are followed. <In order to be eligible via Clause E, players should have 30 standard rated games played within twelve FIDE Standard Rating Lists from February 2019 to January 2020, including at least 18 standard rated games played within six (6) FIDE Standard Rating Lists from August 2019 to January 2020. > https://www.fide.com/images/stories...

How much is dependent on how many games games will be played on what number of rating lists. The math is not as simple as you make it sound. (With exception of the banal point that a game in January will only effect 11 rating lists.)

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <nok: If such a rule was implemented, I'd allow Carlsen to take part in the tournament so he potentially benefits, too.>

How magnanimous of you :)

Sep-21-19  Caissanist: < I am surprised to see players fight on for many moves from clearly lost positions in Game Ones of these mini-matches.>

I used to think that, but over the years I have completely changed my thinking on it. Once you get over the horror of losing, it can actually be more fun, and less exhausting, to play out a lost position than to convert a winning one, so long as there is any possible swindle you can play for. The winner has to keep concentrating to bring home the point, the loser doesn't, he can do whatever he wants. Of course, once you get to the point where the winner can convert the position through basic technique it's not so hard, but surprising defensive resources can pop up in many "easily won" positions if you play too mechanically.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <caissanist> Good point. Not messing up a clearly-won game can possibly create a lot of tension, tire out the winning player.
Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<nok> Don't get me wrong. If such a rule was implemented, I'd allow Carlsen to take part in the tournament so he potentially benefits, too.>

And have FIDE and the WCC match organizers lose out on the profits of having a WCC match? Not to mention all the chess enthusiasts world-wide that would be denied of a top-level chess event.

Besides, how does Carlsen or any other defending WCC benefit? As the rules currently stand instead of playing a 14 game match they have to play in a 14-game tournament.

Nice try at a recovery from a very silly post but don't worry, I got you right the first time.

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: I was trying to make a joke, not really trigger the kibitzing apocalypse!

Now, what if I told you the player who won by two was wearing a kilt with a hideous chartreuse and mauve plaid pattern? Should the GM still become champion, or be disqualified under the garish kilt clause? (Don't answer that. Please.)

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Chartreuse and mauve plaid? Pathetic!

Hang 'im from the yardarm at dawn!

Sep-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

You are correct Caissanist,

A blank bland score will not tell you the clock times nor betray the players body language, hesitancy, slight shaking, nervousness etc. Only the opposing player can see and sense that.

There may also be a trap or two that has been set that can missed by a casual glance at the game. No engine will show you a plausible human blunder, yet without them or gross one move blunders, no game can be won.

***

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