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 Steinitz and Tchigorin, 1892
  Cover of Russian chess magazine СТРЕКОЗА.
Steinitz vs Chigorin 1892
Havana

In 1892, Wilhelm Steinitz defended his title against his old rival, Mikhail Chigorin. Just as in the the first Steinitz-Chigorin match, this contest took place in Havana, Cuba--and once again, Steinitz emerged triumphant.

The highlight of this match is the biggest shock ending in the history of the Championship. In game #23, Chigorin, a piece ahead, was on the verge of tying the score at 9-9 and sending the match into overtime. Rather than sealing his move, he made it on the board, and in so doing, unprotected his h-pawn allowing Steinitz a mate-in-two that ended the match.[1]

And so, after 23 games Steinitz won his fourth World Championship match, by a score of +10 -8 =5.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920212223
Chigorin1½½0½011½10100101010½00
Steinitz0½½1½100½01011010101½11

FINAL SCORE:  Steinitz 10;  Chigorin 8 (5 draws)
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Steinitz-Chigorin 1892]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #4     Steinitz vs Chigorin, 1892     1-0
    · Game #1     Chigorin vs Steinitz, 1892     1-0
    · Game #23     Chigorin vs Steinitz, 1892     0-1

FOOTNOTES
1. Graeme Cree, World Chess Championship History Website.

 page 1 of 1; 23 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Chigorin vs Steinitz 1-031 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
2. Steinitz vs Chigorin ½-½32 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
3. Chigorin vs Steinitz ½-½32 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
4. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-028 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
5. Chigorin vs Steinitz ½-½55 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
6. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-047 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC59 Two Knights
7. Chigorin vs Steinitz 1-028 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
8. Steinitz vs Chigorin 0-124 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC58 Two Knights
9. Chigorin vs Steinitz ½-½34 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
10. Steinitz vs Chigorin 0-130 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC58 Two Knights
11. Chigorin vs Steinitz 0-145 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC62 Ruy Lopez, Old Steinitz Defense
12. Steinitz vs Chigorin 0-126 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC59 Two Knights
13. Chigorin vs Steinitz 0-138 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
14. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-033 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
15. Chigorin vs Steinitz 1-047 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
16. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-038 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC77 Ruy Lopez
17. Chigorin vs Steinitz 1-039 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC52 Evans Gambit
18. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-039 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchA04 Reti Opening
19. Chigorin vs Steinitz 1-032 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC45 Scotch Game
20. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-041 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchD05 Queen's Pawn Game
21. Chigorin vs Steinitz ½-½47 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC25 Vienna
22. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-049 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
23. Chigorin vs Steinitz 0-132 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchC34 King's Gambit Accepted
 page 1 of 1; 23 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-12-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  jamesmaskell: How unlucky.
Sep-16-06  Bobak Zahmat: Chigorin was probably getting a little bit nervous. :)
Sep-20-06  percyblakeney: Chigorin had the lead with 1-0, 5-3, 6-5, 7-6 and 8-7 but Steinitz equalised five times and won in the end.
Sep-20-06  capanegra: It is curious that Steinitz chose to play a close opening with White only in the last three games (#18, #20, #22), knowing that Chigorin always felt uncomfortable with such openings. In the three games mentioned, he had very easy victories. Moreover, in their 1889 match, Steinitz played closed in the eight games he had White, and his score was (+7 -1 =0). My presumption is that if he had played close openings in the other games of this match he would have won for a larger margin.
Jun-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: 5 draws in a 23 game match. Today 5 wins would be more likely.
Oct-07-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <In game #23, Chigorin, a piece ahead, was on the verge of tying the score at 9-9 and sending the match into overtime. > That overtime was to 3 wins by one of the players.
Feb-28-08  Knight13: <My presumption is that if he had played close openings in the other games of this match he would have won for a larger margin.> Chigorin the Knight Lover hating closed openings? I thought Knights are attracted to closed openings; he should've been happy.
Feb-28-08  Knight13: Steinitz adopted the 6...d6 move against Captain William Davies Evans Gambit instead of moves like ...Qf6 in his previous match against Chigorin, and did well with it!
Jun-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: WILHELM STEINITZ: CHESS CHAMPION

Part One: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-TY...

Part Two: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1-d...

Part Three: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEJ3...

Part Four: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIBK...

Part Five: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTor...

Part Six: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGAF...

Apr-14-11  Tigranny: Couldn't 32.Bb4?? in Game 23 be the greatest blunder ever committed, even more than 34...Qe3?? by Kramnik was? I have it as #1 in my game collection about the top 10 greatest blunders because it cost Chigorin the entire match.
Nov-21-13  Method B: <<Gypsy>That overtime was to 3 wins by one of the players.>>

So this paragraph below was meant only for the 20 game match?

<If it reached a score of nine games each, the match would end in a draw and the defending champion Steinitz would retain the title.>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_...

Nov-21-13  jnpope: For the 1892 match, Steinitz reported:

<The following is one of the rules governing the contest: "In case of both players winning nine games all, a match of three games up, draws not counting, shall be played between them, the winner of this match to be declared the victor."> source: New York Daily Tribune, 1892.02.28

I'm not sure where the "a 9-9 tie"="retains the title" came from.

Nov-21-13  Method B: <jnpope> Thanks for the quick response!

The Steinitz-Gunsberg match had a similar clause mentioned on this site's WCC overview article:

<The conditions for this match were: Best of 20 games or 10 wins to win; in the event of a 10 points to 10 points tie, play continues until one player has won 10 games; in the event of a 9 wins to 9 wins tie, Steinitz retains the title.>

Steinitz-Gunsberg World Championship Match (1890)

It seems they assumed Steinitz/Chigorin rematch & Steinitz/Gunsberg match had the same regulations (tie breaking system).

Or the Gunsberg match is incorrect as well?

Nov-21-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Steinitz-Gunsberg:

Winner is the player winning 10 games (draws not counting) with following exceptions: a) in case of 9-9 match is declared as drawn; b) 20 games maximum and if 20 games were played, winner is he who has most wins.

Source: 'International Chess Magazine', November 1890, pages 325-328.

Steinitz-Chigorin 1892:

<The winner of the first ten games, exclusive of draws, will be the victor, and in that respect this match will greatly differ from and will be more of a test than the previous contest between the two players in 1889, and the one between Steinitz and Gunsberg, played in the early part of the present year, in which the number of games were limited to a maximum of twenty. Otherwise, however, the regulations will be the same in the main as in the last-named match, with some alterations to suit the different local conditions and the possible increase in the number of games.>

Source: 'International Chess Magazine', July 1891, pages 200-201.

Both from Edward Winter's <World Chess Championship Rules>: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

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