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Alekhine-Euwe 1937 Euwe vs Alekhine 1937
The Netherlands

Alexander Alekhine challenged Max Euwe to a rematch, and Euwe agreed to the challenge and the conditions. From October to December in 1937 the match was conducted, again in the Netherlands. If Alekhine had made the mistake of underestimating Euwe in 1935, he certainly did not underestimate him this time. Euwe won the first game with the white pieces, but in the end Alekhine's resolve (perhaps fueled by the 1935 defeat) proved to be too much for the Dutch Champion. After 25 games, with a score of +10 -4 =11, Alekhine gained the title for the second time.

After the match, Euwe wrote of his opponent with great admiration:

Alekhine's perfect technique and combinative talent are so well known that it is unnecessary to talk about them. His conduct of the endgame was shining. Even so, I admire most how he finished the adjourned games. I had to analyze them, too, so I know them well. When I think of how my opponent created ingenious ideas and how he finished them in unexpected ways, I have only the greatest admiration for Alekhine's playing style.[1]
This was Alekhine's final title match. He held the title of World Chess Champion until his death in 1946.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Alekhine01½½0111½1½½01½½0½½½
Euwe10½½1000½0½½10½½1½½½

click on a game number to replay game 2122232425
Alekhine11½11
Euwe00½00

FINAL SCORE:  Alekhine 15½;  Euwe 9½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Euwe-Alekhine 1937]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #6     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0
    · Game #22     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0
    · Game #2     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0

FOOTNOTES
1. World Chess Championship Index by Mark Weeks

 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-050 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-041 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
3. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½60 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
4. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½27 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
5. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-041 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
6. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-023 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
7. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-134 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
8. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-026 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
9. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½41 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
10. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-040 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
11. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½30 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
12. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½26 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
13. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-068 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
14. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-052 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE00 Queen's Pawn Game
15. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½62 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
16. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½65 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE02 Catalan, Open, 5.Qa4
17. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-041 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
18. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½51 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
19. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½49 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
20. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½41 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
21. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-132 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE16 Queen's Indian
22. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-062 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchA09 Reti Opening
23. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½50 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE17 Queen's Indian
24. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-041 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD40 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
25. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-143 1937 Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE46 Nimzo-Indian
 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-23-11  AVRO38: In terms of quality, the 1937 match is probably the greatest World Championship ever.
May-09-11  ARubinstein: <In terms of quality, the 1937 match is probably the greatest World Championship ever.>

I assume you're joking.

May-10-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < ARubinstein: <In terms of quality, the 1937 match is probably the greatest World Championship ever.> <I assume you're joking.>

Having seen some of <AVRO>'s other pronouncements, I rather doubt it.

<positionalgenius: My disdain for Alekhine is justified.This guy simply ran and never played a WCC match again.>

He could have played Keres, under the aegis of the Nazis, I suppose.

May-10-11  aliejin: "In terms of quality, the 1937 match is probably the greatest World Championship ever"

I fully agree
The games are of exceptional quality.
Virtually no games no value

May-11-11  aliejin: "My disdain for Alekhine is justified"

it is justified until you become aware
of your ignorance

Anyone who knows history (basic it is enough ) can imagine what it was Europe and the world from 1938 onwards ...

May-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <aliejin> Revisionist history lesson:

In June 1938, Stalin and Hitler signed a treaty to make war on the forces of ignorance, released all prisoners in their respective countries, proclaimed their undying love for King George, and Capablanca beat Alekhine in six straight games to reclaim his world title.

The AVRO event was won by Capa, 14-0, and Euwe returned to university in defeat.

Jul-18-11  AVRO38: The picture on this page appears to be of the 1935 match.

Can anyone confirm?

Jul-19-11  sneaky pete: <AVRO38> You're right. The picture stems from page 7 of Tartakower's book (published by the newspaper De Telegraaf) of the 1935 match.
Jul-19-11  AVRO38: Thanks <sneaky pete>! The arbiter's desk and players' table were all raised in the 1937 match but here they all seem level with the ground. Also Alekhine was considerably heavier in 1937 than he is in this picture.
Jul-19-11  aliejin: "... When I think of how my opponent created ingenious ideas and how he finished them in unexpected ways, I have only the greatest admiration for Alekhine's playing style.. "

This words of Euwe ( see above ) remember me the following words of Reti

" Under the frozen layers of contemporary technique... In games won by Alekhine
Shine burning desire to find new ways ... " ( From "capablanca" Panov )

Mar-04-12  StrongSquare: <WhiteRook48>..Capablanca lost the 1927 match by ACCIDENT????.....lol...what are you smoking? Alekhine studied Capablanca's games for years leading up to that match!
Mar-04-12  StrongSquare: <talisman> Alekhine by the 1930's had no reason to fear Capablanca, nor was he "ducking" him; he merely wanted Capablanca to raise 10,000 dollars stake money to play a return match. This condition was in accordance with Capablanca's own wishes in his "London Rules" of 1922...look it up...every prospective challenger from 1922 onwards had a very hard time raising that 10K...Alekhine resented this condition greatly, and THAT is why Alekhine didn't play him: Capa couldn't raise the 10K.
Mar-05-12  RookFile: Euwe didn't raise 10 thousand either, by the way, yet Alekhine played him. By the way, did you look at 1936 for example? How did Capa do that year compared to Alekhine?

One other slight difference, heading into the rematch that this page covers, was that Capablanca had defeated Euwe in a match in 1931, but Alekhine had lost to Euwe in 1935.

Mar-05-12  AlanPardew: Euwe wasn't a signatory to the London Rules so he wasn't bound by it. But the Rules didn't require that $10,000 be the minimum match stakes, only that the champion could refuse to accept a challenge for a lesser amount. In both matches with Bogo (who was a party to the London Rules), Alekhine waived that right.

<Alekhine resented this condition greatly, and THAT is why Alekhine didn't play him:>

Yes, he resented it, but I think he also used it as a pretext to avoid playing Capa. In the same way that Fischer used his match conditions to avoid playing the 1975 match.

Mar-05-12  RookFile: In other words, Alekhine played two matches with a circus clown, and two more with a guy who lost a match to Capa.

Yes, it's all clear now.

Mar-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: That's 3 more matches than Fischer was willing to play unless he was given the advantage of retaining his title if the match with Karpov reached 9 wins for each player.
Mar-05-12  Olavi: Euwe or rather the Euwe committee raised the 10K in the sense that the winner's share was quaranteed. In other words, Euwe didn't receive a dime in 1935, while Alekhine got more than stipulated.
Mar-05-12  RookFile: Not every page of chessgames relates to Fischer, even though sometimes it seems so. The topic of this page concerns Alekhine, Euwe, and Capa.
Mar-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: What does a page about the Euwe vs. Alekhine 1937 World Championship Match have to do with Capablanca or, for that matter, circus clowns?
Jun-01-12  theoreticaldraw: <perfidious: He could have played Keres, under the aegis of the Nazis, I suppose.>

Bogo was also available, in case anyone was clamoring for a trilogy.

Jun-02-12  MORPHYEUS: <theoreticaldraw: <perfidious: He could have played Keres, under the aegis of the Nazis, I suppose.>

Bogo was also available, in case anyone was clamoring for a trilogy.>

You're not as funny as your brother.

Jun-02-12  Khapablanca: "Euwe won the first game with the black pieces"

Chesgamess.com, fix it, please. Looks like Euwe has the WHITE pieces in that very first game..

Nov-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < theoreticaldraw: Bogo was also available, in case anyone was clamoring for a trilogy.>

Entirely possible, but by WWII, Bogo was over the hill, just another hasbeenusetawas. Yet another AA-Bogo match probably would have lacked even propaganda value.

Jul-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <The Rocket: "At the time, Euwe may we have been considered the favorite in the rematch, the idea being that Alekhine was drunk and washed up."

Euwe was indeed concidered to be the favourite in this match beliave it or not.... it came as a suprise Alekhine took back the titel.

That tells you how times had change when one of the greatest players of all time is an underdog against someone like Max Euwe.>

After winning the match in 1935 Euwe was the 1st (together with Fine) for a half point ahead of Alekhine in Amsterdam 1936, the 2nd behind Fine in Zandvoort 1936 (Alekhine did not participate), the shared 3rd-5th with Fine and Reshevsky behind Capablanca and Botvinnik but once again a half point ahead of Alekhine in Nottingham 1936, the 1st in small double round robin in Bad Nauheim/Stuttgart/Garmisch in 1937 as usually ahead of Alekhine and Bogoljubov by a half point, and finally he had quite good performance (8,5/11) at chess olympiad in Stockholm (Alekhine did not participate). Alekhine's performances in the period between two matches with Euwe were not bad by any standard, he was the 1st in Dresden 1936, the shared 1st with Keres in Bad Nauheim 1936, the 2nd a half point behind Flohr in Podebrady 1936, only the 6th but just for 1 point behind winners in Nottingham 1936 with performance 9/14 (not bad at all), the 1st ahead of Fine in Hastings 1936/7, the 3rd behind Keres and Fine in Margate 1937, and the shared 4th-5th with Keres just a half point behind Petrov, Flohr and Reshevsky in Kemeri 1937. But in comparison to his utter dominance before the 1935 match this was nothing special, and in all tournaments, where he met Euwe, he finished behind him with complete score in their five games +1-2=2 from Alehine's perspektive (he won the game in Nottingham but lost one in Amsterdam and one in Bad Nauheim). Euwe was younger and still improving, while Alekhine seemed to be already in decline. That is why Euwe was considered to be favourite in the 1937 rematch. But the score of the match and especially the content of games showed quite clearly who was still the boss then. In optimal form Alekhine was a beast.

Aug-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <chessgames.com>: There is an error on this page. Your summary states that <Euwe won the first game with the <<black>> pieces...>.

But the first game link goes to
Euwe vs Alekhine, 1937, where clearly Euwe has the White pieces.

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