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Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1929
Germany and the Netherlands

Alekhine-Bogoljubow Immediately after winning the match, Alexander Alekhine announced that he would play Capablanca a return match on the same terms that Capablanca had required as champion[1]: the challenger must provide a stake of US $10,000 in gold, of which more than half would go to the defending champion even if defeated.[2]

In 1928 Capablanca did manage to produce a $10,000 offer from Bradley Beach, New Jersey to host the rematch. Unfortunately, negotiations dragged on for several years, often breaking down when agreement seemed in sight. In 1928, Alekhine instead accepted a challenge from the Russian-born German grandmaster, Efim Bogoljubov. Bogolubov was a semi-sound attacking player, who had a style which could lead to brilliant victories against anybody, but often at the risk of losing. At Bad Kissengen in 1928, Bogoljubov won first prize ahead of Capablanca, despite losing his individual game against the Cuban. His style was reminiscent of the romantic era of chess, and brought him many impressive tournament victories, but on the whole he tended to perform worse than the world elite. Despite his victories at Moscow 1925, and Bad Kissingen 1928, the chess pundits expected that Bogoljubov had very little chance of success.[3]

The match conditions were the best of 30 games, and 6 wins. At first it seemed to be a well balanced and exciting contest, with Alekhine and Bogoljubov both winning two games out of the first six. Alekhine then won a string of games and accrued a four point lead, from which Bogoljubov never recovered. The match was over after only 25 games, and Alekhine's World Championship reign continued.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Alekhine1½½01011½1½100½1101½
Bogoljubov0½½10100½0½011½0010½

click on a game number to replay game 2122232425
Alekhine11½½½
Bogoljubov00½½½

FINAL SCORE:  Alekhine 11;  Bogoljubov 5 (9 draws)
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Alekhine-Bogoljubov 1929]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #8     Bogoljubov vs Alekhine, 1929     0-1
    · Game #18     Bogoljubov vs Alekhine, 1929     1-0
    · Game #1     Alekhine vs Bogoljubov, 1929     1-0

FOOTNOTES
1. World Chess Championships by Graeme Cree

 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-026 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD16 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½51 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchE23 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann
3. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½70 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
4. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 1-038 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
5. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-048 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
6. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 1-048 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
7. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-035 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD78 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O c6
8. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-130 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchA50 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½30 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
10. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-149 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½63 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD51 Queen's Gambit Declined
12. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-156 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 0-134 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
14. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 1-071 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
15. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½45 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD70 Neo-Grunfeld Defense
16. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-160 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
17. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-034 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD70 Neo-Grunfeld Defense
18. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 1-051 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchC11 French
19. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-077 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD51 Queen's Gambit Declined
20. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½48 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchC74 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense
21. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-049 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
22. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-139 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchC76 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense, Fianchetto Variation
23. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½83 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
24. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½38 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchC11 French
25. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½55 1929 Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship MatchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-18-06  positionalgenius: <whatthefat>Me neither.Yes,Me and Tal will meet again...:)
Oct-03-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: This was probably the most entertaining WCC match in the history. Despite all of that AA vs Capa rematch controversy (and mythology), which overshadows - as the previous discussion shows clearly - this event and its meaning in chess history, Bogo was an outstanding player who deserved his chance to play for the title. Look on these games more closely and judge for yourselves whether it was worthless or not to play this match.:-)
Jan-14-07  gauer: The recent chesscafe annual quiz has a problem relating to the match here. Is there a way to allow for extra info to be allowed to be gathered in the games (or somewhere on the match-page intro) that would state which city the game was moved to for which games? Currently, the field is taken up by announcing the stature of the locality, which is also okay to include.
Mar-12-08  MichAdams: <The match conditions were the best of 30 games, and 6 wins.>

'...and 6 wins'!?

Apr-08-08  RookFile: Mich asks a good question, it's not exactly clear what the phrase means. Alekhine put 11 victories up on the board, so it can't mean that the match would have ended as soon as somebody scored 6 wins. (Unlike early Karpov vs. Kasparov matches, where that was a condition).
Apr-08-08  MichAdams: The subject was discussed here:

Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934)

Apr-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: I think it simply means that the match is best out of 30 games, with a 6 win requirement. So you if you are leading after 30 games but have only won 4 games the match is not over. The earliest the match could technically end would be after 16 games (16-0). I'm sure others have already posted this elsewhere
Apr-08-08  Petrosianic: <Look on these games more closely and judge for yourselves whether it was worthless or not to play this match.:-)>

In hindsight worthless. Beforehand, perhaps not.

<With> hindsight, it's hard to argue that someone who loses by 6 points was a good challenger. Some of the games are entertaining, yes, but I've felt the same way about some of the games of the Lasker-Marshall match.

May-06-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Ignoring an offer from Bradley Beach, New Jersey to host the Capablanca-Alekhine return match, Alexander Alekhine instead accepted a challenge from the Russian-born German grandmaster, Efim Bogoljubov. Bogolubov was one of those semi-sound attacking players of the type who score some impressive tournament victories, but who invariably come out very badly against their fellow elite. Despite Efim's victories at Moscow 1925, and Bad Kissingen 1928, the chess world gave him little chance of success.1>

I wouldn't call it 'unbiased', quite the reverse.

May-06-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Gypsy <1929 -- Alekhine plays Bogolubov for less than the full ammoung of $10,000.->>

My source* said price money <FF 200,000 <<<>>>> but I've no historical conversion table to compare it with US$.

It said nothing about %sharing. In a footnote it said that Bogo received all extra amounts from the organisers that accrued to them.

* Rochade Eurpa, issue 7/1993, page RE7.

Sep-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <<With> hindsight, it's hard to argue that someone who loses by 6 points was a good challenger. Some of the games are entertaining, yes, but I've felt the same way about some of the games of the Lasker-Marshall match.>

With all respect I disagree. Bogoljubov well deserved his chance for WC shot and his performance in the match was much better than the result may suggest. He won five games, some in pretty impressive brilliant style, and he could have won a few more of them. Alekhine in his then form would have probably crushed everybody and he was undoubtedly stronger player but Bogo by his bold entertaining play made the match very interesting and was able to score more wins against AA than Capa did during his match in 1927. To compare this match with completely one-sided wipe-out like Lasker-Marshall match is not much fair to Bogo.

Sep-22-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: As far as I remember this was Alekhine's first serious chess the Capablanca match. I think he had been doing a world tour for 2 years, playing simultaneoi.
Sep-22-08  FHBradley: He is also supposed to have completed his Doctor of Law at Sorbonne (1928, I believe), which he didn't, though.
Oct-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  nasmichael: I see that the match went for 25 games. My question is...in how many games were their adjournments? I like the "to-be-continued" aspect of the pre-computer games, as Bronstein has mentioned, and the opportunities for greater understanding and pursuit of endgame mastery in the process of studying what could exactly be done in the process of sealing a move, studying it with a second, and then preparing to fight another day.

Again, does anyone know the number of adjournments in this match?

Dec-06-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: "There are 3 necessary factors to get success:

1. The understanding of own strength and weakness.

2. The accurate understanding of opponent's strength and weakness.

3. The more high aim than the current satisfaction. I see this aim in the scientific and artificial achievements which put chess game into the row of other arts."

(AA in 1929, about distinctions between him and Efim Bogoljubov).

Jul-24-09  ALEXIN: According to www.chessmetrics.com Bogo was number 4 top player when he played the match in 1929.
Aug-03-09  WhiteRook48: 11 wins
Jul-20-10  aragorn69: I lately stumbled on something quite out of the ordinary about this WC match: the titleholder wrote (almost daily) reports on the games for the New York Times!

Amazing, isn't it? And totally impossible to imagine anything of the kind happening nowadays... There were Alekhine articles about at least the first eight games, played at Wiesbaden. They make for a good read at http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Jul-08-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: Nice clear video of AA, Bogo and Lasker: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ap0...
Jul-08-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Thanks, Calli!
Jul-08-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <KP> Stole the link from the last Chess Note :-)

Got a kick out of the guy in the back acting like he is taking down all the moves as they blitz through an opening for the camera.

Jul-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <Admins> Excuse me, but this is the fourth time I have pointed out to you that your introductions in this series are often written in a sloppy manner.

Your introduction states that <"In 1928 Capablanca did manage to produce a $10,000 offer from Bradley Beach, New Jersey to host the rematch.">

This "fact" requires actual evidence. Your citation for this "fact" is from <Graeme Cree's> website: http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp...

As I have demonstrated in previous complaints about your WCC Series, <Cree> is not a reliable source. Not only does he not list his own sources, he is frequently mistaken on basic matters of fact.

#########################

In the case of this particular <Cree> citation,

First, the date (1928) is wrong.

<Alekhine and Capa> did agree in principle to a rematch under the London rules to be held in 1929:

<"Dr. Alekhine also confirmed the report that he had agreed to meet Capablanca in 1929 in a return match.">

--American Chess Bulletin
Feb. 1928, p. 29

In the first round of negotiations in 1928 <Capa> in fact failed to raise the $10,000 necessary to stage a rematch in 1929. In <Capa's> words, it was planned to be an <"encounter"> that would <"most likely take place in the United States.">

--Edward Winter, "Capablanca"
McFarland, 1989, p. 212

The negotiations for a rematch in <Bradley Beach> did not occur until 1929, for a match to be held in 1930. The mayor of <Bradley Beach> was willing to negotiate for staking a match in the summer months of 1930, although there is no evidence that $10,000 was guaranteed by them at this time. The Mayor wanted the match held in summer 1930 so that he could cover the stake costs through tourism. However, <Alekhine> wrote that he was only willing to play in <Bradley Beach> between Oct. 15 and Dec. 15 of 1930.

A letter from <Norbert Lederer> to <Capa> on Dec. 24th 1929 indicates it was unlikely that <Bradley Beach> had indeed raised, and pledged, the $10,000 dollars:

<"Referring to match [in Bradley Beach], I am... willing to do my best regarding the organization of same, but you will have to supply the main effort yourself as without your help it will be very difficult to raise the money. The recent Wall Street crash has hit some of our friends very hard indeed and we will find it quite difficult to get any substantial amounts from them.">

--Edward Winter "Capablanca"
McFarland, 1989, p. 219

####################

Second, you are not even bothering to read your own citations carefully. Whoever wrote your introduction here failed to notice that <Cree's> citation nowhere mentions the "fact" that <Bradley Beach> had secured the $10,000 necessary to fund the match.

This "fact" is also conspicuously absent from <Edward Winter's> biography of Capablanca, which reproduces all known correspondence concerning the rematch negotiations. The "fact" is also absent from every single biography of <Alekhine>.

#####################

This is not a "minor mistake" in your introduction- If the two "facts" you have wrong were actually true, this would cast a significant cloud over <Alekhine> in favor of <Capa>, placing much more blame on <Alekhine> for the ultimate failure of the rematch negotiations. So either find a proper source for these "facts" or rewrite the intro, ok?

<Daniel> we have already spoken about this months ago and you assured me that you agreed there is a problem with these introductions and you also assured me something would be done about it. But it hasn't.

In our previous conversation about this, I suggested allowing the existing team of CG.com historians to make changes in the WCC intros, and you seemed receptive to the idea.

It's time to do something about this.

Jul-27-12  aliejin: "In 1928 Capablanca did manage to produce a $10,000 offer from Bradley Beach"

The team of CG told me they have no
evidence for this ... They just
read it in some site .... once ..
a could not remember where..

Jul-28-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <aliejin> Thanks for the background.

First, as I'm sure you'll agree, "some site" is not adequate proof for such a contentious fact, particularly when it's not the site the introduction actually lists as a source.

As I have just demonstrated, the < "In 1928 Capablanca did manage to produce a $10,000 offer from Bradley Beach"> claim is simply false.

The date is incorrect and there's no evidence supplied that <Capa> had the $10,000 guarantee for <Bradley Beach>, or for any other venue at this or any other time, for that matter.

Worse, the incorrect dating here renders the logic of this passage worthless and misleading. It's not a "small error" of interest only to pedants. The <Bradley Beach> negotiations were not in play until *after* <Alekhine> had already agreed to play <Bogoljubow> in 1929.

Edward Winter's <Capablanca> is unambiguous about all this, as I have shown, with actual references to primary material.

<aliejin> the problem is not limited to this one page. I have just emailed <Daniel Freeman> with a proposal to rewrite the introductions to the WCC feature so that they are factual and properly sourced.

Mar-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: http://chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/Play... rated Bogoljubov as World Number 1 rated player for January & February 1927. This I imagine is a knock-on effect from his win at Moscow (1925).

Alekhine was defending his title only 2 years after winning it. Capablanca had waited 6 years and lost it at the first attempt.

Oddly, apart from a small and not-very-strong tournament at Bradley Beach (1929) this WC match was Alekhine's first serious chess outing; he had been playing, as I fatuously called them earlier, simultaneoii.

The match was a good one. Unlike the 1927 match, this one was not a (essentially) one-opening pony; nor was it a constant disquisition on Q+R endings. There were lots of errors but that's chess.

Soon after this match the full effects of the Black Monday US Stock Market Crash were felt in Europe and raising 2,500 became increasingly difficult. Also, Alekhine seemed to grow in strength in the years 1931-33 which may have discouraged challengers. Bogoljubov tried again but less successfully in Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934).

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