chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

  WCC Overview
 
  << previous HISTORY OF THE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP next >>  
Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1934
Germany

Alekhine-Bogoljubow 1934 In the years since the 1929 World Championship Match a new generation of strong players had just begun to arrive on the scene, including Sammy Reshevsky and Reuben Fine of the US, Paul Keres of Estonia, Mikhail Botvinnik of the USSR, and Salo Flohr of Czechoslovakia, as well as Jose Capablanca, who was still trying unsuccessfully to arrange a return match for the title. Under the circumstances, the chess world reacted with something less than jubiliation when it was announced that Alexander Alekhine's next title defense would be against Efim Bogolubov again. The match was regarded as little more than an exhibition by all, including Alekhine himself, who said such things as this in My Best Games of Chess, 1924-1937:

This game - more than any other - proves how useless from the sporting point of view was the arrangement of this second match, and at the same time explains my indifferent play on a number of occasions.[1]
The match conditions were the best of 30 games, and 6 wins. The match was over after 26 games.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Alekhine½1½1½½½½101½½½½11½½½
Bogoljubov½0½0½½½½010½½½½00½½½

click on a game number to replay game 212223242526
Alekhine1½001½
Bogoljubov0½110½

FINAL SCORE:  Alekhine 8;  Bogoljubov 3 (15 draws)
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Alekhine-Bogoljubov 1934]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #4     Alekhine vs Bogoljubov, 1934     1-0
    · Game #2     Alekhine vs Bogoljubov, 1934     1-0
    · Game #17     Bogoljubov vs Alekhine, 1934     0-1

FOOTNOTES
1. World Chess Championships by Graeme Cree

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 26  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½65 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD40 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
2. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-037 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD48 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran
3. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½27 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD22 Queen's Gambit Accepted
4. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-061 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
5. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½51 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD26 Queen's Gambit Accepted
6. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½60 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
7. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½17 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
8. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½66 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchE24 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
9. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-146 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchA44 Old Benoni Defense
10. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 0-181 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-162 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchA92 Dutch
12. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½75 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD49 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran
13. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½74 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchA47 Queen's Indian
14. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½54 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD43 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
15. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½70 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD21 Queen's Gambit Accepted
16. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 1-043 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchC77 Ruy Lopez
17. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-141 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD24 Queen's Gambit Accepted
18. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½28 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchA46 Queen's Pawn Game
19. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine ½-½58 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
20. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½44 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
21. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-163 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD02 Queen's Pawn Game
22. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov ½-½42 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
23. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 1-058 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD23 Queen's Gambit Accepted
24. Alekhine vs Bogoljubov 0-139 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
25. Bogoljubov vs Alekhine 0-144 1934 Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship RematchD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 26  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <percy blakeney><Don't forget Spielmann, he won a ten game match against Bogo in 1932. :-)>

That brings up a question. One of my favorite measures for how good a chess master is from after 1900 through the early 30s is how well he did against the big three: Lasker, Capablanca and Alekhine.

It's a tough test. Bogoljubov had horrible scores against all three. Nimzowitsch had terrible scores against Alekhine and Capablanca. Rubinstein did OK against Capablanca and Lasker, but not Alekhine. Maroczy did badly against all three. Vidmar had negative scores against all three, though not dreadful ones. But Spielmann all but held his own: +2-4=11 against Alekhine, +2-2=8 against Capablanca, +0-1=4 against Lasker.

But as far as I can tell, Spielmann was never seriously considered as a challenger for the world title. Does anyone know why?

Apr-08-08  Petrosianic: I don't know why specifically, but I'd guess that (for whatever reason) he never seriously pursued it. Either he didn't think enough of his chances to try to get the necessary funding (I've never heard any stories of his trying and failing), or he didn't want the aggravation of the whole process. When he beat Bogo in 1932, chessmetrics shows him as the world #11. Plus, he was 48 years old at the time. Maybe the odds just weren't worth the effort.
Apr-08-08  Petrosianic: <Leaving aside the merits of your match predictions, I think Fine and Reshevsky were not yet well-known outside of America (of course Reshevsky had been a famous child prodigy, but hadn't done much yet as an adult), and Keres wasn't known at all.>

Yeah, the "New Generation" wasn't quite there yet in 1934. By 1938 they were, in force.

But in 1934, Fine was only 19 years old. Keres and Reshevsky weren't even close. Botvinnik was fairly good by then, but not quite Top 10 material, and only 22 years old.

Kashdan might have made a good challenger. He was at his peak in the early 30's. This was Flohr's best time, too.

Apr-08-08  RookFile: Yes, I'm not saying that some of these guys should have played Alekhine. I'm just saying they would have beaten Bogo.
Apr-08-08  slomarko: <Arguably, you can throw the meteor known as Sultan Khan onto this list as well.> RookFile trolling as usual.
Apr-08-08  percyblakeney: <But as far as I can tell, Spielmann was never seriously considered as a challenger for the world title. Does anyone know why?>

He probably didn't have enough money, and maybe he lacked a just a little bit result wise even if he had some very impressive tournament wins, like Semmering 1926, ahead of Alekhine.

I read somewhere that the list of players that had an even score with Capablanca, after having won more than one game against him, is very short. It looks like this:

Rudolf Spielmann

Apr-08-08  Petrosianic: <I read somewhere that the list of players that had an even score with Capablanca, after having won more than one game against him, is very short. It looks like this:

Rudolf Spielmann>

I guess that's true, the way you stated it: "after having won MORE than one game". But several people had even scores against him based on more than one game played, such as: Keres +1-0=5, Botvinnik +1-1=5, Reshevsky +1-1=4, and Fine +0-0=5.

And the list of people who won more than one game from Capa (with or without breaking even) is pretty darn short: Lasker, Alekhine, Marshall, Spielmann... hmmm, is that it?

Apr-08-08  RookFile: Juan Corzo is worth a mention.
Apr-08-08  percyblakeney: On the Spielmann page it is also mentioned that he played a training match against Euwe in 1935. Spielmann scored +4 -2 =4, so in their latest matches before playing Alekhine, the latter's challengers both lost to Spielmann...
Apr-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <But several people had even scores against him based on more than one game played, such as: Keres +1-0=5, Botvinnik +1-1=5, Reshevsky +1-1=4, and Fine +0-0=5.>

Yes, but all of those games are 1935 or later, aren't they? Not to denigrate the players -- the mid-30s generation was the strongest to come along since I don't know when. But they were playing a diminished Capablanca. That's one reason Spielmann's score impressed me so much.

Apr-08-08  RookFile: It's true that Capa had lost a step. It gives you an indication of what his strength was at his peak when you think of a second gear Capa playing somebody like Botvinnik even.
Apr-08-08  Petrosianic: Yes, it's certainly something to be proud of, and I have to confess, a Capablanca-Spielmann match might have had some interest, just because Capa beat other wild attacking players (like Marshall, Bogo and Janowski) handily, but this one he didn't.

If I could rewrite history, I'd schedule a Capablanca-Spielmann match in 1919, in place of that Capablanca-Kostic massacre that was actually played.

Oct-30-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  mjmorri: I believe the New York tournament of 1927 was thought of as a kind of candidates tournament for the right to play Capablanca.

Alekhine could have used this approach in selecting an opponent. Offer the winner (or runner-up in case Alekhine won) of a major tournament the right to arrange a match.

There probably would have been more interest in funding such a match.

Oct-30-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <mjmorri: I believe the New York tournament of 1927 was thought of as a kind of candidates tournament for the right to play Capablanca.>

No, it wasn't.

Oct-30-08  Petrosianic: <No, it wasn't.>

You're right, it wasn't. The Capablanca-Alekhine match was already signed and sealed before New York 1927 began, and would have happened regardless of how Alekhine fared in that tournament.

Of course it would have been a little embarrassing if anyone other than Capablanca had outscored him, but still, it was not in any way, shape or form a Candidates Tournament. Neither was AVRO.

Oct-30-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  mjmorri: <Petrosianic><Karpova>

My source came from this site.

www3.sympatico.ca/g.giffen/playersA-E.html

I guess I should have check further.

Sorry for the misinformation.

Mar-30-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <keypusher:
But as far as I can tell, Spielmann was never seriously considered as a challenger for the world title. Does anyone know why?>

According to Seirawan and Silman in "Winning Chess Tactics":

"Reuben Fine once wrote that (Rudolph) Spielmann's main concern in life, apart from chess, was to accumulate enough money to buy limitless quantities of <beer>!"

(page 151)

So your answer is, Spielmann kept drinking away the prize money!

Aug-12-11  AVRO38: <I'm not saying that some of these guys should have played Alekhine. I'm just saying they would have beaten Bogo.>

What you seem to forget is that Bogoljubov played two matches against Euwe for the FIDE championship and won both. He also won the 1925 Moscow super-tournament ahead of Capablanca and Lasker, as well as the super tournament in Bad Kissingen (1928) ahead of Capablanca, Euwe, Rubinstein, and Nimzowitsch, was second only to Alekhine at the Bled 1931 tournament, ahead of Flohr, Kashdan, and Nimzowitsch, and was a two time USSR champion. He also has a world #1 ranking by Chessmatrics.

The myth that Bogoljubov was some kind of weak player is nonsense. His performance in the 1934 match was as good or better than Euwe in 1937, or Tal in 1961.

Jan-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <CG Administration>

It is more than a little irritating that nowadays your <Cree> reference links shove a gigantic <AOL> ad in your face. To get to the actual web page, I have to go manually through Google.

In that vein, it's also irritating that you give this passage in your intro without mentioning which game <Alekhine> was referring to:

"The match was regarded as little more than an exhibition by all, including Alekhine himself, who said such things as this in My Best Games of Chess, 1924-1937:

This game - more than any other - proves how useless from the sporting point of view was the arrangement of this second match, and at the same time explains my indifferent play on a number of occasions.1 "

I happen to have the book in question, so I'm going to find the answer, but I shouldn't have to be looking for it manually if you bring it up in your introduction. Sloppy writing on your part, at best.

When you eventually take over the many historical games collections constructed by members, I really hope you choose to give them admin rights over their introductions, which, frankly, are in the majority of cases vastly superior to the introductions in your <World Chess Championships> series.

Are you aware that User: Penguincw has mirrored the function of your <World Chess Championships> series with more detailed, better written, yet still fairly concise introductions?: Penguincw's Game Collections

I think you should consider replacing your introductions with his- they are clearly better.

Jan-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: Courtesy of <chancho>:

<The match was regarded as little more than a giant exhibition by all, including Alekhine himself, who said such things as this in My Best Games of Chess, 1924-1937, in his notes to the <<<4th>>> game:>

Mar-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: The introduction to this page is very missleading.
Suggesting that players like Keres, Reshevsky and Fine were serious contenders for the WC-title in 1934 is just laughable. Keres was 18 at the time and had not played outside Estonia. Reshevsky was just comming back from a long break due to his education and played soly in the US. Fine had not played outside US at the time either. Chessmetrics (yes I know...) has Botvinnik listed as #11 in the April 1934 list. Fine is #32 and Reshevsky and Keres are not even listed in the top 100.
Jan-12-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: It should be noted that Hans Michael Frank (back then Minister of Justice for Bavaria) was also the driving/supporting force (together with Culture Minister Hans Schemm) behind the realisation of this match in Germany.

Related sources/documents can be found in C.N. 4820: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Jan-12-14  Petrosianic: <The introduction to this page is very missleading. Suggesting that players like Keres, Reshevsky and Fine were serious contenders for the WC-title in 1934 is just laughable.>

The intro says that these players "had just begun to arrive on the scene", which is completely true. But the next sentence does imply that they were actual contenders at this time, which of course, they weren't. There was only one reasonable challenger in 1934, and that was Capablanca, whom Alekhine was ducking. According to Euwe, Alekhine played the matches with himself and Bogo because he needed the money, which is why he could complain about Bogo being there but play him anyway.

Jun-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: The photo to accompany this match at the top of the page reminds me of those Stalin-era photographs/drawings where non-persons are erased from history and new ones put in as they come into favour.
Sep-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ssitimefill: It seems like this championship was held in at least 5 different cities.

I imagine that driving between cities in Germany in 1934 took much longer and was much less comfortable than would be the case today.

Did no Nazi think that the constant changing of location might have a negative effect on the quality of the chess being played?

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 3)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies