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Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1954
Moscow

Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1954 The 1953 Candidates Tournament, held at Zurich, was a marathon 15 player double round robin. Vasily Smyslov (+9 -1 =18) finished two points ahead of Bronstein (+6 -2 =20) to challenge Botvinnik at Moscow in March 1954. Botvinnik won three of the first four games, but by the 11th game Smyslov had taken the lead. Just as with his match against Bronstein, once again Mikhail Botvinnik retained his title on a tied match.

The 24-game match had 14 decisive games, 12 of the first 16, including a streak of 8 decisive results in a row! All the games were full of fight, and many of the games were of theoretical significance.[1]

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718192021222324
Botvinnik11½1½½0½00011011½½½0½½0½
Smyslov00½0½½1½11100100½½½1½½1½

FINAL SCORE:  Botvinnik 12;  Smyslov 12
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Botvinnik-Smyslov 1954]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #14     Botvinnik vs Smyslov, 1954     0-1
    · Game #9     Smyslov vs Botvinnik, 1954     1-0
    · Game #4     Botvinnik vs Smyslov, 1954     1-0

FOOTNOTES
1. The Botvinnik-Smyslov battle by Dennis Monokroussos

 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 0-158 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC18 French, Winawer
2. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1-030 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE45 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Bronstein (Byrne) Variation
3. Smyslov vs Botvinnik ½-½41 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC18 French, Winawer
4. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1-061 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD22 Queen's Gambit Accepted
5. Smyslov vs Botvinnik ½-½41 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD44 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
6. Botvinnik vs Smyslov ½-½34 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD86 Grunfeld, Exchange
7. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 1-050 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC15 French, Winawer
8. Botvinnik vs Smyslov ½-½50 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD02 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 1-025 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC18 French, Winawer
10. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 0-137 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD22 Queen's Gambit Accepted
11. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 1-041 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC79 Ruy Lopez, Steinitz Defense Deferred
12. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1-038 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
13. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 0-141 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchB24 Sicilian, Closed
14. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 0-133 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
15. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 0-136 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchB25 Sicilian, Closed
16. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1-045 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
17. Smyslov vs Botvinnik ½-½31 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchA07 King's Indian Attack
18. Botvinnik vs Smyslov ½-½58 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
19. Smyslov vs Botvinnik ½-½41 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC15 French, Winawer
20. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 0-172 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
21. Smyslov vs Botvinnik ½-½38 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC15 French, Winawer
22. Botvinnik vs Smyslov ½-½45 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchD83 Grunfeld, Grunfeld Gambit
23. Smyslov vs Botvinnik 1-028 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchC00 French Defense
24. Botvinnik vs Smyslov ½-½22 1954 Botvinnik-Smyslov World Championship MatchE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-12-06  Ch3ckmate: Botvinnik must have had loads pressure on him after losing 3 games in a row and tieing the match soon later.
Mar-21-08  Knight13: I like how a lot more games are win/loss than draws!!!
May-17-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: This match was an all out war!
Feb-07-09  bluberry66: no it wasn't it was death rage killing war!!!!!!! LOL
Feb-07-09  bluberry66: I can not cream my sister I DESTROY HERRR!!@!! HARHARHAR
Feb-07-09  Dredge Rivers: <bluberry66> I'm sure everyone found your comments just so verrrrrrrrrrry insightful!
Feb-25-09  WeakSquare: Does anyone know of any books about this match (and other Bot-Smys matches)? They were one of the most exciting and hard fought in chess history.
Feb-25-09  nescio: <WeakSquare> You'll need to be patient for a few months, but then an English translation of Botvinnik's classic will be available: http://www.newinchess.com/Botvinnik...

Acoording to the publisher it will be available in May, but even if some months later I think it may be well worth waiting for.

Feb-25-09  WeakSquare: By Botvinnik himself, cool...
Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: <WeakSquare: Does anyone know of any books about this match (and other Bot-Smys matches)?> The Chessgames sponsor New in Chess now offers the book you've been looking for. Indeed, it was worth the wait. The link is: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/clic...
Jan-16-10  waddayaplay: <Plato: There is also some suspicion that Bronstein may have been under coercion by the Soviet authorities not to wrest the title from Botvinnik.>

On the other hand..
< [In the 1950 Candidates tournament] Boleslasky had been leading, a point ahead of Bronstein, but had agreed to draw his last two games to give Bronstein a chance to catch up. Soltis: “But in 64 Smyslov hints that Boleslavsky agreed to the draws after bowing to pressure from Veinstein, the head of a GULAG department and ‘an influential man in the country’. Veinstein wanted to make sure Botvinnik was defeated, and he knew Boleslavsky didn't have a good record against the world champion. >
http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hans6...

Jan-16-10  AnalyzeThis: There you have it. Another tournament, another round of fixed games.
Jan-16-10  Red October: <AnalyzeThis: There you have it. Another tournament, another round of fixed games.> quite possible and probable, but doesn't this also indicate that the "fixing" was not the work of a single power "The Commie Cheats" but rather various individuals vying for power within a structure that was extremely difficult to survive in...

quite different from the allegation that "The Soviets have fixed World Chess..."

Jan-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: <Veinstein wanted to make sure Botvinnik was defeated>

Curiouser and curiouser...

Jan-16-10  Olavi: Yes, in the last round Boleslavsky agreed a 16 move draw with the well known Swedish commie cheat Stahlberg.
Jan-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <“But in 64 Smyslov hints that Boleslavsky agreed to the draws after bowing to pressure from Veinstein, the head of a GULAG department and ‘an influential man in the country’. >

Yes, and very close to Bronstein; he is even alleged to be the real author of the text (though not the annotations) of the Zurich 1953 book. Bronstein's close relationship with a secret policeman in Stalin's USSR never seems to bother Bronstein's fans, though.

Jan-16-10  Red October: <with the well known Swedish commie cheat Stahlberg.> you mean <acirce> ? ;-p
Jan-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <Yes, and very close to Bronstein; he is even alleged to be the real author of the text (though not the annotations) of the Zurich 1953 book.>

I would say more than alleged: Bronstein himself said so. Well, at least much of the text, maybe not every word.

Jan-16-10  AnalyzeThis: Stahlberg knew a good deal when he saw it.
Apr-04-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Soviet cheating was well-known before the 1950s, it seems.
Apr-29-11  bronkenstein: Repeating any nonsence on and on converts it to the truth slowly, Goebels and folks from CNN would be proud of you folks :)
Aug-05-12  Psihadal: Maybe the best world championship match ever, played by the most underrated rivalry in chess: Smyslov-Botvinnik.

I wish Smyslov had won this match, he deserved to hold the world title for much longer than just a year in my opinion.

Aug-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  talisman: <Psihadal> check out game 24...22 move draw? with the match on the line?...and still some play left.
Aug-05-12  Psihadal: <talisman> Of course, it's not easy to explain. White had the advantage at the final position but Smyslov should have fought on since he had nothing to lose. Perhaps he underestimated his chances and maybe he even offered the draw because then he would split the prize money with Botvinnik (Since the match is tied) instead of playing on and risk losing it, just a guess. But This match was an epic struggle in spite of the final game.
Aug-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <talisman> This is consistent with the preceding title match (Botvinnik-Bronstein World Championship Match (1951)).

Then there's the finish of Botvinnik's final stay in the penthouse suite (Petrosian-Botvinnik World Championship Match (1963)). The concluding three games totalled 41 moves.

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