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Petrosian vs Spassky 1966
Moscow

 Petrosian and Spassky
 Both colleagues and adversaries.
In 1966 Tigran Petrosian met popular challenger Boris Spassky who entered the match a big favorite. Not only had Spassky convincingly defeated Keres, Geller and Mikhail Tal in candidates matches, he had also played model chess in a universal style. Spassky seemed equally at home in the wilds of the King's Gambit and other open games as in the thickets of the King's Indian and assorted closed positions. At a strictly personal level, if not to the manor born, Spassky was certainly to the gracious manner born. In the match Spassky achieved numerous promising positions only to run into a record number of exchange sacrifices and other sophisticated holding maneuvers. He thrashed about and found himself two points down after 10 games. He evened the score after game 19, but Petrosian won the 20th and 22nd games to clinch the title defense, +4 -3 =17.[1]

After failing to dethrone him in 1966, Spassky described Petrosian as, "first and foremost a stupendous tactician."[2]

The match took place in Moscow between April 9 and June 9, 1966. After the full 24 games, Petrosian defended his title of World Chess Champion.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718192021222324
Spassky½½½½½½0½½0½½1½½½½½10½01½
Petrosian½½½½½½1½½1½½0½½½½½01½10½

FINAL SCORE:  Petrosian 12½;  Spassky 11½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Petrosian-Spassky 1966]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #10     Petrosian vs Spassky, 1966     1-0
    · Game #7     Spassky vs Petrosian, 1966     0-1
    · Game #12     Petrosian vs Spassky, 1966     1/2-1/2

FOOTNOTES

  1. The Kings of Chess by Larry Parr
    2 The Game of Tigran Petrosian Book review by Edward Winter, 1991

 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½37 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB19 Caro-Kann, Classical
2. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½50 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchD59 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower
3. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½43 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB14 Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack
4. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½44 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA14 English
5. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½79 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB14 Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack
6. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½15 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchD40 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
7. Spassky vs Petrosian 0-143 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA46 Queen's Pawn Game
8. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½23 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA33 English, Symmetrical
9. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½26 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB14 Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack
10. Petrosian vs Spassky 1-030 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchE63 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Panno Variation
11. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½26 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchC10 French
12. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½39 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA04 Reti Opening
13. Spassky vs Petrosian 1-091 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB19 Caro-Kann, Classical
14. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½57 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA05 Reti Opening
15. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½55 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB24 Sicilian, Closed
16. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½49 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB06 Robatsch
17. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½29 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchB30 Sicilian
18. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½33 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchE17 Queen's Indian
19. Spassky vs Petrosian 1-068 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchC11 French
20. Petrosian vs Spassky 1-041 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchE59 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line
21. Spassky vs Petrosian ½-½39 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchC11 French
22. Petrosian vs Spassky 1-035 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchA40 Queen's Pawn Game
23. Spassky vs Petrosian 1-031 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchC11 French
24. Petrosian vs Spassky ½-½77 1966 Petrosian - Spassky World Championship MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-06-13  jonie: Alekhine (fanatical zeal to win)
Botvinnik (iron logic)
Capablanca (endgame purity)
Tal (intuitive aggressive play)
Fischer (optimistic play)
Kasparov (hybrid pragmatic approach)

these are my 6 greatest players of all time.

Nov-06-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: <Diademas: <<RookFile> ... I heard the winner got 2.500$. This leads me to a pet theory of mine: That the Soviets actively tried to keep prize money in chess at a low level, as to not encouraging players from other (read western) countrys to take up chess on a professional level.>

Makes a lot of sense to me.

I hope all is well in beautiful Bergen!

Nov-06-13  Everett: Botvinnik had more of a chromoly logic. Took a long time to rust.
Jun-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <alshatranji: "if not to the manor born". Do you mean "not to the manner born"? Or you actually referring to the British sitocm? And what does the phrase actually mean in reference to Spassky?>

LOL! Well spotted.

It is still there, 5 years later. I can imagine Spassky chuckling along to the antics of Peter Bowles and Penelope Keith. I found the program slightly less funny than a burning orphanage, but Spassky may have loved it owing to the Peter Bowles character having the real name of <Bedrich Polouvicka> - undoubtedly a Leningrader.

The correct phrase, one that I would never use myself, comes from Shakespeare's <Hamlet> (page 94) and is predictably incomprehensible:

<"Though I am a native here and to the manner born, it is a custom more honoured in the breach than the observance."> Who?

Mar-19-15  1d410: Spassky was beating on Iron Tigran so Petrosian threw tantrums, setting up a bunch of funny and outrageous defensive manouvers. A great match to watch for fun!
Mar-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <1d410: Spassky was beating on Iron Tigran....>

Believe you must be referring to the end phase of their second match for the title--the only time Spassky managed anything like 'beating on' his great adversary.

Mar-19-15  1d410: <perfidious> Then why didn't we see any of Petrosian's exchange sacrifices and such against botvinnik? Spassky was THE master of development and the initiative before Fischer.
Mar-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Great players adjust their game to their opponents--evidently you do not grasp this simple fact. This match, moreover, has nothing to do with anything regarding what went in Botvinnik-Petrosian, so your injection of that match into this scenario is a red herring and non sequitur.
Mar-20-15  Lambda: <When I build a top 10 list that covers many years, I consider how did any candidate for the list fare against his contemporaries. With that in mind: 1 - Morphy (clearly the #1 by my standards)
2 - Fischer (Remember his candidate run?)
3 - Capablanca (10 years without a loss)>

1 - Philidor dominated his contemporaries more than Morphy.

2 - Steinitz put together a better string of results against his contemporaries in the 1870s than Fischer's.

3 - Tal put together longer runs of undefeated <games>, (which are surely the important measure, remaining undefeated by not playing much isn't an impressive feat), than Capablanca - twice!

In any case, penalising Karpov for playing in the same era as Kasparov, or penalising Kasparov for playing in the same era as Karpov is clearly silly.

Mar-20-15  Howard: But please bear in mind that Steintz didn't face nearly the same caliber of competition that Fischer did.

As for Philidor (!), just how much competition was there back in the late 1700's ?!?!

Mar-20-15  1d410: <perfidious: Great players adjust their game to their opponents> Especially when one opponent is more difficult than another one :). Botvinnik is my favorite champion, but he was an old man when he played Petrosian.
Mar-20-15  1d410: Spassky really put the pressure on Petrosian's defensive capabilities...
Mar-20-15  1d410: My 10 personal favorite historical players:
Botvinnik
Tal
Kramnik
Karpov
Spassky
Petrosian
Capablanca
Fischer
Smyslov
Best non-champion: Bronstein
Mar-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Kibitzers seem unusually inhibited when it comes to "My Favourite Players". The lists seem to be identical to the list

<"Players Who I Think Other People Think I Should Say Are The Best Players of All Time">.

Wake up, dudes! Have some originality.

Mar-20-15  1d410: I was never very creative.. sorry :P
Mar-20-15  1d410: I'm more a math person
Mar-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <1d410:> I was not addressing you! I was talking to hoi polloi, not gentry.
Mar-20-15  Mr 1100: <Have some originality.>

The greatest of all time:

10. Khalifman
9. Radjabov
8. Waitzkin
7. Saidy
6. Nikolic
5. Larsen
4. Granda-Zuniga
3. Salov
2. Shirov
1. Rublevsky

Mar-20-15  Lambda: <But please bear in mind that Steintz didn't face nearly the same caliber of competition that Fischer did.

As for Philidor (!), just how much competition was there back in the late 1700's ?!?!>

Thus illustrating the problem of evaluating them by comparing them to their contemporaries.

Mar-20-15  1d410: <Mr 1100>
All time greatest Marshall the great swindler!
Mar-20-15  Everett: My favorites, for their games: Bronstein and Karpov

My favorites, for their writing: Suba and Rowson

For both writing and games (despite some sketchy analysis): Seirawan

But I like them all.

Mar-20-15  nok: <Philidor dominated his contemporaries more than Morphy.> Really? What good did he do, besides loving his pawns?
Mar-21-15  greed and death: <Wake up, dudes! Have some originality.>

k then

1. Reshevsky
2. Petrosian
3. Tartakower
4. Korchnoi
5. Zuckertort (who wouldn't love a guy whos last name means "sugar cake" anyways?)

Aug-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Some match-footage: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/R...
Aug-01-15  Mr. V: I like <Mr. 1100>'s list haha. Rublevsky for the win ;)
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