chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

  WCC Overview
 
  << previous HISTORY OF THE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP next >>  
Fischer vs FIDE, 1975
Fischer forfeits.

After defeating Spassky in 1972, Bobby Fischer stopped playing serious chess, turning down several lucrative offers to play in public.

Fischer, circa 1971 In 1974, Fischer's challenger was decided: he was an emerging Russian chess superstar, Anatoly Karpov, who had defeated Korchnoi in the candidate's final to earn him the right to challenge Fischer.

In September, 1973, Fred Cramer, Vice President (Zone 5) of FIDE, proposed that the world championship match be decided on 10 wins, draws not counting. He also proposed that the champion retains his title if it were a 9-9 tie. This became known as the Cramer proposal. Fischer telegrammed FIDE informing them that they should adopt the Cramer proposal.[1]

Opponents of the proposal argued that the unlimited format is impractical, and that the 9-9 rule affords the champion too great of an advantage. Proponents claimed that the proposal would encourage exciting chess (because draws do not count) and that it more accurately determined the better player. Fischer argued the merits of the proposal in a 1974 letter to FIDE:

The first player to win ten games, draws not counting, with unlimited number of games wins the match. If the score is nine wins to nine wins, draws not counting, the champion retains title and the match is declared drawn with the money split equally. Versus the old system of the best of 24 games wins the match (12.5 points) and if 12-12 the match is drawn with the champion retaining the title and prize fund is split equally. Draws do count in this system.

The unlimited match favors the better player. This is the most important point, because in the limited game system the match outcome can turn on a very low number of wins, giving the weaker player a chance to "luck out." Also, in the limited game system the player who takes a game or two lead has an advantage out of all proportion. This creates an added element of chance. The player who wins the match should be the player who plays best over the long run, not the player who jumps off to an early lead.[2]

In June, 1974, the FIDE Congress in Nice approved the 10-win regulation and the elimination of draws from the scoring, but imposed a 36-game limit and rejected the 9-9 proposal. On June 27, 1974, Fischer sent a telegram from Pasadena, California to the FIDE Congress:
As I made clear in my telegram to the FIDE delegates, the match conditions I proposed were non-negotiable ... FIDE has decided against my participation in the 1975 World Chess Championship. I therefore resign my FIDE World Championship title.

In March, 1975, an extraordinary FIDE Congress was held in Bergen, Netherlands, and it was agreed to have an unlimited number of world championship games, but still refused the 9-9 rule (32 votes for it, and 35 votes against it). [3] Fischer, unwilling to budge, refused to defend his title.

In Karpov's memoirs he recounts how he was disappointed to not have a chance to become champion in the traditional manner:

I don't know how Fischer feels about it, but I consider it a huge loss that he and I never played our match. I felt like the child who has been promised a wonderful toy and has it offered to him but then, at the last moment, it's taken away.[4]

On April 3rd, 1975, Karpov was declared the 12th World Champion.

FOOTNOTES

  1. Robert James Fischer, by Bill Wall
    2 Bobby Fischer letter to FIDE, 1974
    3 Robert James Fischer, by Bill Wall
    4 Karpov on Karpov: Memoirs of a Chess World Champion, by Anatoly Karpov, Athenuem Press, 1992.

Sorry, no games at this time.
You may wish to visit the home page and try a different search.

 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 101 OF 101 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <optimal play> I think that the perception of Karpov and the other Soviet players as automatons is, like Mark Twain said about reports of his death, greatly exaggerated.
Oct-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Everett> A great story and worth remembering, even if there is no big billy goat behind you. Just remember in that case to run fast after you pass the troll!

Something somewhat similar happened to me many years ago. I was the last presenter at a design review on a subject that, frankly, I didn't know much about and was not comfortable discussing. The first presented went up, started his presentation, and when he was asked the first question he said (without missing a beat):

"Well, <AylerKupp> will be addressing that later." I, of course, was not prepared to address the question, and I wasn't sure whether I understood it. Then each presenter down the line, as soon as he was asked a question, responded "<AylerKupp> will be addressing that later.

Fortunately when my turn finally came it was obvious to everyone that this was all a joke and they didn't demand answers to their questions.

Had that happened to me recently, with many more years of experience and quicker on my feet, when I first went up to present I would have said "Hello, I'm John Doe. Unfortunately <AylerKupp> isn't with us today and I will try to present his material as best I can ..."

Oct-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <bobthebob> You know what happens with probability and quantum mechanics, every outcome has a non-zero probability of happening
Oct-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <RFW3> I don't think that Spassky went into the Fischer match in 1972 unprepared. But I would say that he wasn't prepared <enough>. I think that it's safe to say that Karpov in 1975 would have been <much> better prepared than Spassky in 1972.
Oct-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Absentee: <Fishy: Fischer was insane by 1975...he could have even played 1 game before quitting...that is the fact.>

"Facts" aren't the stuff you pull out of your ass. Just for your information.

Oct-19-15  nok: <Fischer had a rating of 2780 and Karpov of 2705, for a rating difference of 75> It's a bit misleading as Karpov was usually content to draw with Black. Which didn't prevent him from taking prizes.
Oct-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: <AylerKupp> <seemed like a small price to pay> Exactly, all right, when I talk about what is right or not, the president from past world chess matches anyway, was that the sitting champ has been given almost cart blanche to set the match conditions. This Cramer/Fischer proposal, was in a way married to this idea. WE both are in agreement that the 9-9 drawn provision should have been granted, as you say, a small price to pay, with very , very little odds of it actually happening. But actually with BIG rewards, too!! The biggest reward, would be the obvious continuation of having the World's best player staying active and not abdicating the crown!! . Giving the chess world a possibility of maybe Fischer/Karpov 2 as well! I feel the world chess community was of course financially on the upswing, and keeping Bobby playing, with worldwide interest, would have benefitted all players and fans alike. FIDE blundered, big time. Of course, in my most humble opinion:-)
Oct-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <john barleycorn:
<AylerKupp: ...If it is a fake, it is a good one. ...>

Yes, with a chessboard set up wrong.>

<AylerKupp: <john barleycorn> Ha! I missed that completely.>

The photo (obviously doctored) comes from Spassky/Fischer Siegen 1970:

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/sp...

Oct-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Joshka: <AylerKupp> <seemed like a small price to pay> Exactly, all right, when I talk about what is right or not, the president from past world chess matches anyway, was that the sitting champ has been given almost cart blanche to set the match conditions. >

That's false, post-1948. FIDE set the rules, which changed very little from match to match. The only big change before Fischer was adopting a first to six wins format, which happened in 1971 (to go into effect in 1975). No one asked Boris Spassky's permission.

Won't waste any words on the rest of your post.

Oct-20-15  RFW3: <AylerKupp> I somewhat agree that Spassky wasn't exactly unprepared to face Fischer. But insisting on the team he did and ignoring the instructions from Moscow to `stand up' to Bobby (Political Reasons, perhaps, seeing that Spassky wasn't exactly a loyal party member.) sure did as much to do him in than the preparations for the actual play.

<optimal play> No, what I meant was the Soviets would have made absolutely sure Karpov was prepared for the match, they would have stood for none of what Spassky pulled off before the 1972 match.

Oct-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  optimal play: <RFW3> Thanks for the clarification, but I think you're underestimating Spassky.

Boris was a worthy champion, and a truly great chess player who was still at his peak in 1972.

He was as prepared to defend his title as he could be, as he himself said, "I was determined to play the match at all costs because I thought I could win. I was confident in myself as World Champion. Up until then, Bobby had never beaten me. I felt comfortable with Bobby. I could easily predict his moves."

<AylerKupp: <RFW3> I don't think that Spassky went into the Fischer match in 1972 unprepared. But I would say that he wasn't prepared <enough>. I think that it's safe to say that Karpov in 1975 would have been <much> better prepared than Spassky in 1972.>

No amount of preparation could have readied Spassky for what he faced across the board in 1972 any more than excessive preparation could have given Karpov a hope in 1975.

Of course the Fischer-haters will disdain this with their vile obscenities as they do anything which suggests Bobby would have won in 1975.

Oct-24-15  Albion 1959: Incredible to think that a match that was never played has attracted so much interest, that it has now reached page 101 in the Kibitzing page ! I am not aware of any other game or feature on this site that has had so many pages devoted to it. I stand to be corrected if there is. And if there is then I am sure that someone who uses this site regularly will probably know for sure.
Oct-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <optimal play....No amount of preparation could have readied Spassky for what he faced across the board in 1972 any more than excessive preparation could have given Karpov a hope in 1975....>

In the runup to 1972, there was a cover of <Chess Life & Review> featuring: 'But Boris, what if he DOESN'T play 1.P-K4?'

Classic, although the signs of Fischer's being more than ready to deviate from that beloved first move were already present in a number of games from 1970.

Oct-24-15  beatgiant: <Albion 1959>
<any other game or feature on this site that has had so many pages>

That answer is on the chessgames.com statistics page, ChessGames.com Statistics Page which shows the top 30 pages with most kibitzing, and this is not among them.

Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Absentee: That doesn't even fit with my reply. It's not even a comeback, witty or otherwise. If you really have to be stupid, can't you be at least coherently stupid?

A FACT is something that happened. Not something you think would have happened. Hopefully you got it now.

Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: It is plain that <Absentee> is the anti-Humpty Dumpty, to his credit.

We've enough Humpty Dumpties about; one need only trundle over to Rogoff for abundant evidence of this.

Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  optimal play: <perfidious> <the signs of Fischer's being more than ready to deviate from that beloved first move were already present in a number of games from 1970> Good point!

e.g. Fischer vs Mecking, 1970

Plus some experimentation in simuls and blitz with f4 & Nf3

Despite what the media and others thought, Boris wasn't caught off guard by Bobby's opening with 1.c4

In any event, he still opened with 1.e4 in 5 out of 9 times in the match.

Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: <chessgames.com> Please, the tile should read Fischer-Karpov World Championship Match had the match taken place.
Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: "In the runup to 1972, there was a cover of <Chess Life & Review> featuring: 'But Boris, what if he DOESN'T play 1.P-K4?'"

Just in case anyone wants to see it.

http://www.redhotpawn.com/chess-blo...

----

Bobby's openings variations.

Fischer's very first White on here has Bobby playing 1.d4! (he had no principles in 1954)

Fischer vs J Altusky, 1954

----

Hi Joska,

There is a thread called 'Fischer-Karpov World Championship Match' this thread is all about what would have happened at the re-match.

Fischer - Karpov III and IV are out there somewhere for when we ge bored with these two. This site thinks of everything.

Oct-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: "Now that is the question."

The question that needs answering is who is 'Kaspy'. Do you mean Spassky?

Oct-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Here is another odd thing about this non-match.

Throughout Fischer's career he had been the benjamin of every tournament and event. It was only at Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970) that he began encountering a younger generation, in players such as Mecking and Hubner. It must have been odd for him to look around the chess world and realise that now he, Fischer, the great Wunderkind - was now the old geezer!

He may have played through games from events such as USSR Championship (1974) and seen that there was an upcurrent of players about whom he knew nothing. It may have been rather unsettling.

Oct-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Sally Simpson> Fischer's very first White on here has Bobby playing 1.d4! (he had no principles in 1954)>

Or maybe he simply had not done enough testing of 1.e4 to claim that it was best by test, at least not in a statistically significant way.

Oct-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Fishy> Is having access to today's meds in 1984 any easier than having access to today's meds in 1975? Now THAT is the question.
Oct-31-15  Everett: <No amount of preparation could have readied Spassky for what he faced across the board in 1972 any more than excessive preparation could have given Karpov a hope in 1975.>

Karpov was prepared and even showed up in 1975, walking away the victor and twice defended his title. Then he followed up by being #2 from '85-'96, giving the chess world game after game of great, instructive chess.

There was really no hope, clearly, that Fischer was able to keep his focus on chess without losing his marbles. His record pre and post championship condemn the idea of an alternate possibility.

Nov-08-15  PJs Studio: Maybe if the Russian's weren't cheating in tournaments and trying to drive Fischer out of competitive chess for years then we could've seen Fischer defend his title for decades to come. Maybe he would've battled Kasparov in 1985. But the Soviet empire - no different than the US hegemony had no interest in playing fairly.

Sure, the Church of God melted Bobby's mind, but only because he felt he was up against a tyrannical government determined to tear him down. Whom he defeated anyway.

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 101)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 101 OF 101 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2016, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies