chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

  WCC Overview
 
  << previous HISTORY OF THE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP next >>  
Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986
London, Leningrad

Due to the rematch clause of the 1985 match, Garry Kasparov was forced to defend his title against Anatoly Karpov in 1986. However, no sooner did the 1985 match end, the details of this rematch were already being hotly contested.

 Karpov vs Kasparov
 Kasparov, Karpov talk with Eric Schiller. Margaret Thatcher on left.
FIDE president Campomanes declared that the rematch would take place in February of 1986, only three months after the previous match, instead of waiting the customary 12 months. On December 30, 1985, Campomanes gave an interview to the Associated Press in Geneva, stating that Kasparov would have until midnight January 7, 1986 to accept these conditions, and if he did not, Karpov would be declared world champion. Kasparov, however, stood firm to his convictions, announcing that he would not participate in the return match so soon after the first match had ended.

To break the deadlock, the Soviet chess federation met on January 21 and decided that the match would take place in July or August. Kasparov and Karpov signed an agreement on the following day without consulting FIDE:

  • a return match would be held in July or August 1986
  • the loser would play in February 1987 against the winner of the current candidates cycle, and
  • the title match for the next cycle would be held in July or August 1987
A week later both players then flew together to FIDE headquarters in Lucerne to meet Campomanes, to present their plans to FIDE, and to finish the arrangements. On 29 January, Campomanes gave a press conference, annoucing the terms of the match.[1]

The match was agreed to begin in July, played in both London and Leningrad, making this the first world championship between Soviet players to be conducted outside of the USSR. The British used the occasion to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first world chess championship, Zukertort vs Steinitz, 1886.

On July 28, the match began. GM Lothar Schmid was the chief match arbiter. GM Ray Keene was the chief match organizer for the London leg. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher conducted the color selection.

On October 8, 1986, Kasparov retained the World Championship title.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718192021222324
Karpov½½½01½½0½½½½½0½0111½½0½½
Kasparov½½½10½½1½½½½½1½1000½½1½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kasparov 12½;  Karpov 11½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kasparov-Karpov 1986]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #16     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     1-0
    · Game #22     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     1-0
    · Game #18     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     0-1

FOOTNOTES

  1. World Chess Championship by Mark Weeks

 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½25 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
2. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½52 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
3. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½35 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE60 King's Indian Defense
4. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-041 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
5. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-032 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
6. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½42 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC42 Petrov Defense
7. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½43 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
8. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-031 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
9. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½20 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
10. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½43 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½41 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
12. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½34 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½40 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE60 King's Indian Defense
14. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-048 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
15. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½29 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD98 Grunfeld, Russian
16. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-041 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
17. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-031 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD98 Grunfeld, Russian
18. Kasparov vs Karpov 0-158 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE12 Queen's Indian
19. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-041 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD97 Grunfeld, Russian
20. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½21 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
21. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½49 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE15 Queen's Indian
22. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-046 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
23. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½38 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchA15 English
24. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½41 1986 Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE16 Queen's Indian
 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-13-08  MichAdams: The man on the left is Charles Powell, then Thatcher's Private Secretary, now Baron Powell of Bayswater of Canterbury in the County of Kent.
Feb-20-08  positionalgenius: These were the best WCC matches ever. Its a shame Karpov lost.
Sep-10-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  talisman: margaret thatcher is heard sighing. "oh...the beard!"
Sep-10-08  Marmot PFL: There was no question that these were the two best players in the world, unlike today. By the time Kramnik and Anand get it on it's possible that neither will be in the top 5.
Sep-10-08  Marmot PFL: Wow, even Maggie looks young in that photo. Too bad Princess Di wasn't a chess fan but I guess her hobby was riding.
Sep-10-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  boz: <Marmot PFL> I think I remember Lady Di showing up at a game in the Kasparov-Short match.
Nov-06-08  newzild: Yeah, Di was a real pawn star.
Dec-10-08  TheChessGuy: This is the best picture of the back of Kasparov's head and Karpov in profile ever taken.
Feb-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: Sport's Illustrated article on this match: http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.....
Jun-28-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Knight13: Now who doesn't wanna be Eric Schiller in that picture?
Jan-01-10  Hesam7: <acirce: It was after Kasparov lost those three games in a row that he sacked Evgeny Vladimirov from his team, accusing him of having given away secret information to Karpov's camp.>

In his latest book ("Kasparov vs Karpov 1986-1987") Kasparov gives more details regarding this incident and for the starters he says that Vladimirov left on his own and he provides anecdotal evidence that someone from his camp was passing information to Karpov, particularly in the case of game 18 where he reproduces parts of an article by Igor Akimov (a psychologist and journalist who was Karpov's team) published soon after match.

Jan-01-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Just wondering--what is Eric Schiller's connection with this match? I see him prominently in the photo.
Sep-18-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: < Hesam7: <acirce: It was after Kasparov lost those three games in a row that he sacked Evgeny Vladimirov from his team, accusing him of having given away secret information to Karpov's camp.> In his latest book ("Kasparov vs Karpov 1986-1987") Kasparov gives more details regarding this incident and for the starters he says that Vladimirov left on his own and he provides anecdotal evidence that someone from his camp was passing information to Karpov, particularly in the case of game 18 where he reproduces parts of an article by Igor Akimov (a psychologist and journalist who was Karpov's team) published soon after match.>

In the same book, Kasparov reproduces a note in which Vladimirov explains that he is leaving the team voluntarily. Apparently, he made this decision shortly after accusing the others of "spy mania" upon their discovery of his "secret telephone"... In the actual note, he simply says

<Feeling physically and mentally exhausted, I have decided voluntarily to leave Kasparov's team.>

Nov-24-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <In his latest book ("Kasparov vs Karpov 1986-1987") Kasparov gives more details regarding this incident […] and he provides anecdotal evidence that someone from his camp was passing information to Karpov, particularly in the case of game 18 where he reproduces parts of an article by Igor Akimov (a psychologist and journalist who was Karpov's team) published soon after match.>

The case which Kasparov puts forward in this book for the information leakage from his team (at least as far as the games themselves are concerned) may be worth quoting in full… In its most complete form, it appears in the context of his telling about what happened on his team right after the 3rd consecutive loss, in game 19. I’ve added in square brackets some relevant information about the specific games mentioned, according to their analyses in the book:

<This sudden move [Vladimirov leaving the team] shed a little light on the mysterious events that had been occurring during the match.

I will summarize the unusual facts which have been mentioned in the earlier commentaries. It will be remembered that back in London, when Karpov encountered my new opening - the Grunfeld defence – not only was he not taken aback, but he struck with great precision directly at the key points of our analysis. He successfully avoided all the traps and effectively anticipated all the strikes we had prepared...

In the 5th game I chose a rare and risky plan [10...Qxd2 instead of Qa5], and quite quickly Karpov found the refutation of the entire idea. This made me suspicious: Karpov could hardly have prepared so thoroughly before the match for this opening. And if the problem was new for him, he should have taken more time thinking about it at the board. So, was home preparation something with a London hallmark? But at the start Karpov had encountered other urgent problems, in the Nimzo-Indian defence, for instance, where in the 2nd game he failed to gain full equality. It was hard to understand how, in less than a week, his team has managed to prepare a complicated variation with an important improvement [apparently he’s referring to 9...Nc6! in the 4th game], and moreover, not in the main direction, but in a sideline. This showed an amazing gift of foresight!

[...]

In the 4th game Karpov effectively closed an entire variation of the Nimzo-Indian defence, by employing a continuation which was one of our analytical secrets. As will be seen from the notes, it was not only the analyses of the two players that coincided, but also the 'holes' in their analyses! Out short-sightedness is easy to explain: we were looking for an advantage for White and we overlooked the plus points of 12...Qc7! [which Karpov should have played instead of 12...Bd7?] But surely Karpov, in searching for a defence for Black, should have discovered this move if he had done some serious analysis beforehand?! But he didn’t discover it...

I was faced with psychological puzzles like this after almost every game. Either our analyses in a narrow field would completely coincide – right down to the faulty assessments of individual moves and positions, or my opponent would inexplicably guess in advance the course that games would take...

In the opening of the 6th game, in my analysis I overlooked a very dangerous move for Black – 11.Qh3! Karpov also ignored it, but he proved to be excellently prepared for 11.Qe3+, the move I had planned beforehand. In the 7th game, Karpov was fully prepared for my new move [9...Nb6], which my trainers and I had looked at a few hours before the start of play. In the 8th game he chose a defence 'with perpetual check' which I myself had prepared for Black and only at the last moment did I notice that here White wins (Timoshchenko was the only one who knew about this); when he saw this at the board, Karpov deviated, but it was too late – Black was already in a difficult position.

[Kasparov is talking about Karpov choosing 13...Be7! thus sidestepping the line 13...Nxe4? 14.Bxe4 dxe3 15.Qh5 exf2+ 16.Kh1 f5 17.Bxf5 g6 18.Bxg6 hxg6 19.Qxg6+ which was considered at first by Kasparov’s team as leading to a draw by perpetual, but was later found to be winning for White after 19...Kh8 20.Rad1 (or 20.Qh5+ Kg8 21.Qg4+! Kh8/h7 22.Rad1)]

In the 11th game, after a preliminary skirmish in the 9th, he struck me with the unpleasant 15.Rxc6, which I had not seen in my home analysis. In the 10th and 12th games he again shocked me by employing rare defences, which my team had actively analyzed for Black.>

Nov-24-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: (Continued)

<When after the 12th game I said that information was probably being handed over by someone in our team, Vladimirov pointed the finger at Timoshchenko, who was working with me alone, without the rest of the trainers. But in Leningrad Timoshchenko was no longer there, and Karpov continued displaying amazing foresight. In the 14th game he forestalled my home preparation [by 19…Rxa3, played instantly by Karpov, for which Kasparov was unprepared].

Nikitin: "A few days before the 16th game Garry found a wonderful combinative idea in a variation of the Spanish the Karpov employed. He asked Vladimirov and Dorfman to refine it, and they showed that, although White was a piece down, his attack was very dangerous." [The idea was 18…Ne5 19.axb5 Qf6 20.Nxc4!! Nxc4 21.Rg3] But my opponent also forestalled this novelty! [by playing 18…Qf6!] After wild complications Karpov’s forces were nevertheless crushed, and my lead increased to three points. In the general euphoria no one paid serious attention to my perplexity and alarm: "Look, Karpov again scored a bull’s-eye!" It was then that Vladimirov let slip for the first time that he would be leaving the team immediately after the match.

After this I contrived to lose three games in succession. In the 17th and 19th games my opponent again caught me in his home preparation in the Grunfeld, and I failed to cope with the unexpected problems. And in the 18th game Karpov took me aback with a novelty which he had been preparing all night, after 'amazingly' foreseeing that this particular position would arise in the game.

[According to another passage in the book, Kasparov is basing this on an article published soon after the match by Igor Akimov, a member of Karpov’s team. Akimov told that on the eve of game 18 Karpov had spent a sleepless night analyzing the position reached after 10…Qe7 (the novelty), as he was completely sure it would occur, trying to make up his mind whether he should enter this line of play. And Kasparov goes on to comment about Karpov’s certainty that this position (following 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Bg5 Bb7 6.e3 h6 7.Bh4 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 d6 9.Nd2 g5 10.Bg3) would occur: "But this raises uncomfortable questions for Karpov. Why after two crushing wins in the Ruy Lopez [in games 14 & 16] should I change tack, and begin the game not with the king’s pawn, but the queen’s pawn? […] Why after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 was I bound to play 3.Nf3 (instead of the successful [in games 2 & 4] 3.Nc3) and – after 3…b6 – 4.Nc3, rather than 4.a3 or 4.g3, inviting the 'modern' variations with 4…Ba6 or 4…c5, which were then coming into fashion? Let us suppose that Karpov made a brilliant guess. But, even knowing the opening, how could he picture in such detail the structure of the opponent’s preparations? […] It has to be agreed that there is only one reasonable explanation…"]

Nevertheless I completely outplayed him, but then strange things began to happen, and the game was adjourned in a difficult position for me. However, Karpov chose the worst of three possible continuations, which should have led to a draw in literally two moves, and he won only thanks to a blunder in our home analysis. [He’s referring to the sequence 43…Rc1? (instead of 43…Ra1!) 44.a6? (instead of 44.Bc5!) 44…Rc2+! (an intermediate check overlooked by Kasparov and his team)] Of course, at the board I should have seen the intermediate check that we had overlooked in our analysis, but Karpov’s choice of an openly weak move speaks volumes!>

(From "Garry Kasparov on Modern Chess, Part 3: Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986-1987")

Nov-24-10  AnalyzeThis: Karpov past his prime was still a fighter, unlike Kasparov who played like a dead fish against Kramnik.
Nov-24-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: <analyze>what utter nonsense! Kasparov continued to dominate the tournament scene, destroying all,opposition. He just had one bad match after 15 years of match dominance.
Dec-17-10  VladimirOo: But what a bad match!
Dec-30-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  talisman: Eric, get well soon....btw..did you see Margaret swooning at you?
Feb-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Eric Schiller: <analyze>what utter nonsense! Kasparov continued to dominate the tournament scene, destroying all,opposition. He just had one bad match after 15 years of match dominance. >

One bad go of it against an historically difficult opponent, when otherwise on great form in the run-up to the match (by Kasparov's own admission), and this appears to be all some people wish to remember.

Dec-11-13  tzar: <Eyal> Thanks for this excellent post...Incredibly not a lot of comments about the incident in this page, especially because the case (if proved) could have been the end of Karpov's career and certainly the total ethical discredit of a chessplayer who IMO has turn out to be quite a good sportsman for decades.

A Kasparov delusion, similar to Fischer's paranoid accusations saying the K+K matches were all staged???

A typical Kasparov disdain for Karpov's victories compared to his own phenomenal achievements and a convenient excuse in case he had lost the match???

Or, on the contrary, a founded accusation based on facts???

Anyway, it seems that Kasparov's claim affects the whole 1986 WC match and not only the 3 games lost in a row. Without doubt, if we believe him it would be the most incredible achievement in the whole history of WC matches...a player who is able to win a match even when his opponent has access to his whole preparation for it!!! Bravo maestro!!!

Dec-17-13  tzar: Nevertheless, until now it does not seem to be credible evidence of the whole affair. The fact that Vladimirov's and even Karpov's reputation were at risk (if not completely destroyed as in the case of Vladimirov)does not seem to worry the Ogre of Baku too much.
Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <On December 30, 1985, Campomanes gave an interview to the Associated Press in Geneva, stating that Kasparov would have until midnight January 7, 1986 to accept these conditions, and if he did not, Karpov would be declared world champion. Kasparov, however, stood firm to his convictions...>

So glad that Kasparov "stuck it" to Campo the Corrupt.

Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Sure an 'tis a load of hooey!
Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <offramp: Sure an 'tis a load of hooey!>

Well, if you think you have the straight scoop, lay it down!

< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies