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Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986
London, Leningrad

Due to the rematch clause of the 1985 match, Garry Kasparov was forced to defend his title against Anatoly Karpov in 1986. However, no sooner did the 1985 match end, the details of this rematch were already being hotly contested.

 Karpov vs Kasparov
 Kasparov, Karpov talk with Eric Schiller. Margaret Thatcher on left.
FIDE president Campomanes declared that the rematch would take place in February of 1986, only three months after the previous match, instead of waiting the customary 12 months. On December 30, 1985, Campomanes gave an interview to the Associated Press in Geneva, stating that Kasparov would have until midnight January 7, 1986 to accept these conditions, and if he did not, Karpov would be declared world champion. Kasparov, however, stood firm to his convictions, announcing that he would not participate in the return match so soon after the first match had ended.

To break the deadlock, the Soviet chess federation met on January 21 and decided that the match would take place in July or August. Kasparov and Karpov signed an agreement on the following day without consulting FIDE:

  • a return match would be held in July or August 1986
  • the loser would play in February 1987 against the winner of the current candidates cycle, and
  • the title match for the next cycle would be held in July or August 1987
A week later both players then flew together to FIDE headquarters in Lucerne to meet Campomanes, to present their plans to FIDE, and to finish the arrangements. On 29 January, Campomanes gave a press conference, annoucing the terms of the match.[1]

The match was agreed to begin in July, played in both London and Leningrad, making this the first world championship between Soviet players to be conducted outside of the USSR. The British used the occasion to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first world chess championship, Zukertort vs Steinitz, 1886.

On July 28, the match began. GM Lothar Schmid was the chief match arbiter. GM Ray Keene was the chief match organizer for the London leg. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher conducted the color selection.

On October 8, 1986, Kasparov retained the World Championship title.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718192021222324
Karpov½½½01½½0½½½½½0½0111½½0½½
Kasparov½½½10½½1½½½½½1½1000½½1½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kasparov 12½;  Karpov 11½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kasparov-Karpov 1986]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #16     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     1-0
    · Game #22     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     1-0
    · Game #18     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986     0-1

FOOTNOTES

  1. World Chess Championship by Mark Weeks

 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½211986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
2. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½521986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
3. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½351986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE60 King's Indian Defense
4. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0411986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
5. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0321986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
6. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½421986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC42 Petrov Defense
7. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½431986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
8. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0311986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
9. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½201986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
10. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½431986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½411986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD82 Grunfeld, 4.Bf4
12. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½341986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½401986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE60 King's Indian Defense
14. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0481986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
15. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½291986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD98 Grunfeld, Russian
16. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0411986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
17. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0311986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD98 Grunfeld, Russian
18. Kasparov vs Karpov 0-1581986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE12 Queen's Indian
19. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0411986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD97 Grunfeld, Russian
20. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½211986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
21. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½491986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE15 Queen's Indian
22. Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0461986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
23. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½381986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchA15 English
24. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½411986Karpov - Kasparov World Championship RematchE16 Queen's Indian
 page 1 of 1; 24 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-24-10  AnalyzeThis: Karpov past his prime was still a fighter, unlike Kasparov who played like a dead fish against Kramnik.
Nov-24-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: <analyze>what utter nonsense! Kasparov continued to dominate the tournament scene, destroying all,opposition. He just had one bad match after 15 years of match dominance.
Dec-17-10  VladimirOo: But what a bad match!
Dec-30-10  talisman: Eric, get well soon....btw..did you see Margaret swooning at you?
Feb-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Eric Schiller: <analyze>what utter nonsense! Kasparov continued to dominate the tournament scene, destroying all,opposition. He just had one bad match after 15 years of match dominance. >

One bad go of it against an historically difficult opponent, when otherwise on great form in the run-up to the match (by Kasparov's own admission), and this appears to be all some people wish to remember.

Dec-11-13  tzar: <Eyal> Thanks for this excellent post...Incredibly not a lot of comments about the incident in this page, especially because the case (if proved) could have been the end of Karpov's career and certainly the total ethical discredit of a chessplayer who IMO has turn out to be quite a good sportsman for decades.

A Kasparov delusion, similar to Fischer's paranoid accusations saying the K+K matches were all staged???

A typical Kasparov disdain for Karpov's victories compared to his own phenomenal achievements and a convenient excuse in case he had lost the match???

Or, on the contrary, a founded accusation based on facts???

Anyway, it seems that Kasparov's claim affects the whole 1986 WC match and not only the 3 games lost in a row. Without doubt, if we believe him it would be the most incredible achievement in the whole history of WC matches...a player who is able to win a match even when his opponent has access to his whole preparation for it!!! Bravo maestro!!!

Dec-17-13  tzar: Nevertheless, until now it does not seem to be credible evidence of the whole affair. The fact that Vladimirov's and even Karpov's reputation were at risk (if not completely destroyed as in the case of Vladimirov)does not seem to worry the Ogre of Baku too much.
Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <On December 30, 1985, Campomanes gave an interview to the Associated Press in Geneva, stating that Kasparov would have until midnight January 7, 1986 to accept these conditions, and if he did not, Karpov would be declared world champion. Kasparov, however, stood firm to his convictions...>

So glad that Kasparov "stuck it" to Campo the Corrupt.

Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Sure an 'tis a load of hooey!
Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <offramp: Sure an 'tis a load of hooey!>

Well, if you think you have the straight scoop, lay it down!

Feb-23-15  Estoc: Has Karpov ever said anything about the accusation of being given Kasparov's secret prep?
Feb-22-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Footage of the preparations for the London part of the match:

http://www.gettyimages.com.au/detai...

Oct-12-16  Allanur: < the loser would play in February 1987 against the winner of the current candidates cycle >

what the hell right do they have to determine the final of candidates tournament? They mutually agreed to make their life easier and so was done?

Can you imagine Anand and Carlsen in 2014 agreed to this condition and Karjakin would first have needed to face Anand after winninh candidates.

Oct-12-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Can't remember how much matches Fischer had to play but no one said: "Poor dude."
Oct-12-16  Howard: Allanur, your comment isn't very clear. Exactly what do you mean ?

All I can say is that the 1985-87 cycle ended up having to be improvised somewhat due to the K-K marathon, in 1984-85.

Oct-12-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <Howard>: <Allanur, your comment isn't very clear. Exactly what do you mean ?>

He worded it very badly, but clearly he's asking why the winner of a the candidates didn't get an automatic title shot, as such winners always had in the past.

One could reasonably argue that the Candidates winner should have got his title shot as always, and the loser of Karpov-Kasparov been seeded into the next candidates (again, as always).

It would have been more boring that way, as Kasparov would surely have toasted Sokolov, but it would arguably have been fairer.

Oct-12-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Lambda: Having the loser of the match play the winner of candidates was surely a way of not having the loser of the match deprived of the opportunity to play in candidates as normal because they were too busy playing for the championship.

Anand and Carlsen wouldn't have been able to do it because there was no match rerun and no revenge match preventing the loser from playing in candidates as normal.

Jan-26-17  Allanur: @Lambda, < Having the loser of the match play the winner of candidates was surely a way of not having the loser of the match deprived of the opportunity to play in candidates as normal because they were too busy playing for the championship. > if X is too busy to take place in the cycle, that is not the right to directly play the final without qualifying there. Life is not obliged to be scheduled for Karpov or Kasparov.

Fischer was absolutely right in ignoring FIDE. Such a certian country favoured organisation should be said "f.ck off." How could they could have supported Karpov more?

@Howard,
< Allanur, your comment isn't very clear. Exactly what do you mean ? > why the winner of candidates were to play the loser of the match? why the loser was given such a *privilege*

Jan-26-17  todicav23: Kasparov is really a bad looser for accusing Karpov of cheating by having access to his preparation.

<In the 7th game, Karpov was fully prepared for my new move [9...Nb6], which my trainers and I had looked at a few hours before the start of play.> This is from a comment on this page. It seems that Kasparov had looked at a variation just a few hours before the game and somehow Karpov, in just a few hours, was able to get access to all that information and also analyze it deeper. It's clear now that Karpov hacked into Kasparov's computer and stole all the preparation. He also had access to a time machine so he traveled to the future and used Stockfish to find holes in Kasparov's preparation.

Since Karpov was very close to win in 1987 it's clear that in that match not only he had access to all Kasparov's preparation but he also used black magic to influence Kasparov's thinking process. Without all these tricks employed by Karpov, Kasparov would have easily won with 12-0.

Jan-26-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <todicav23>: <Kasparov is really a bad looser for accusing Karpov of cheating by having access to his preparation.>

Possibly he is, but your actual arguments are nonsense. (No Black Magic was used, therefore no theft or prep occurred. That's a complete non sequitor.)

Jan-27-17  todicav23: <Petrosianic: <todicav23>: <Kasparov is really a bad looser for accusing Karpov of cheating by having access to his preparation.>

Possibly he is, but your actual arguments are nonsense. (No Black Magic was used, therefore no theft or prep occurred. That's a complete non sequitor.)> Black magic is real!

Feb-19-17  Sally Simpson: Proof of plagiarism is if the original document had spelling mistakes in it and they re-appear in the copied document.

Map makers have been to known to put in deliberate mistakes so fake copiers can be prosecuted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_...

One of the things I recall from Kasparov's claim that a second was feeding Karpov's team was the fact that a Bishop move in an opening they were studying was considered good so they worked out a plan against it.

It was discovered the Bishop move was actually not good.

However come the game and Karpov played the same Bishop move and then an anti plan to Kasparov's plan.

This blunder by Kasparov team was 'apparently' given to Karpov's team who took it at face value and worked on it.

The move in question was 12...Bd7 in this game.

Kasparov vs Karpov, 1986

Kasparov's notes (in his London-Leningrad 1986 book) say:

"It's paradoxical, but a fact, that in our preparations we too regarded this move as best. 12..Qc7 was recommended by commentators and in subsequent analysis a way of developing White's initiative could not be found."

In his 1990 Autobiography he says he had found the mole, Yevgeniy Vladimirov (based by the way on some pretty flimsy evidence) and recalling this game added.

"So it was not just the analysis that coincided, it was also the holes in the analysis."

Basically if there was a mole in Kasparov's camp, it appears he picked up a 'spelling mistake' passed it onto to team Karpov who in turn reproduced the 'spelling mistake.'

I'm of the opinion this is just great players paranoia (they all have it) clutching at straws to explain a later 3 straight defeats.

But Karpov was not averse to playing with Gary's mind.

When the London to Leningrad plane landed (during the flight Gary says he and Karpov played cards together) a limousine with a military escort was laid on for the challenger Karpov. Kasparov, the champion, was given an ordinary Volga with no escort.

Kapsarov thinks this snub was arranged by FIDE or the city elders of Leningrad, but would they really do that?

I reckon it was a relatively easy to organise brilliant ploy by team Karpov to upset Gary.

Ahh the good old days.

Apr-08-17  The Boomerang: "Karpov past his prime was still a fighter, unlike Kasparov who played like a dead fish against Kramnik."

Kasparov wasnt past his prime vs Kramnik, so your comment makes no sense.

In fact he was at his highest elo ever or very close.

That deas fish stayed No.1 in the world until retirement.

How about Fischer? Did that guy even play a game as champ?

Apr-08-17  Howard: Keep in mind that even if Kasparov's ELO rating was at "his highest ever" (or close to that), rating inflation would have been partially the reason.

At the age of 37, Kasparov's best days were certainly behind him--even if he was still #1 on paper. Granted, he did have a hot streak in 1998-99, but that was probably a fluke I suspect.

May-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Geoff: Proof of plagiarism is if the original document had spelling mistakes in it and they re-appear in the copied document....>

In a droll vein, the title character of the Steinbeck short story <Johnny Bear> was a savant who could repeat music, inter alia.

There were people in the small town where Johnny lived who tried to catch him out by having him repeat musical pieces with small mistakes--and he would replay the mistakes.

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