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Kasparov vs Short, 1993
London, England

Nigel Short began his chess career as a bona fide prodigy. He defeated Korchnoi in a simul at the age of 10. In 1977 at the age of 12 he became by far the youngest ever participant in the British Chess Championship. When Nigel was 14, he became British Champion (tied with John Nunn).

 Kasparov vs Short
 Kasparov and Short at the Savoy Theater
During the FIDE candidates matches, when Garry Kasparov was asked who the challenger would likely be, he made the glib answer: "It will be Short and it will be short!" As predicted, Short earned the right to play Kasparov, by beating Speelman 5½ to 4½, Gelfand 5 to 3, Karpov 6 to 4 and Timman 7½ to 5½.

Unhappy with the bidding process to select the site for the match, FIDE's lack of consultation with the players, and the 20% cut of the prize fund going to FIDE, Kasparov and Short made the historic decision to play the title match outside of FIDE's jurisdiction. A new organization called the PCA (Professional Chess Association) was formed for the marketing and organization of the championship match. FIDE reacted by stripping Kasparov of his title and holding its own championship match, Karpov-Timman 1993, to be played concurrent with the Kasparov-Short match.

The Times of London newspaper sponsored the event, dubbing it "The Times World Chess Championship." It was played in the heart of London at the Savoy Theater, a short distance from Trafalgar Square and across the street from Simpson's-on-the-Strand, a famous chess center during the mid-1800s. It was estimated that as many as one million viewers watched the first few games on television.[1]

The match itself was a lopsided victory for Kasparov. The match started tragically for Short, who lost on time in a superior position. Although the games were very hard fought and exciting, Kasparov opened up a big early lead and won comfortably.

With a final score of 12½ to 7½, Garry Kasparov became the PCA Chess Champion--however, he was recognized by the world as the one true World Chess Champion.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Short0½00½½0½0½½½½½01½½½½
Kasparov1½11½½1½1½½½½½10½½½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kasparov 12½;  Short 7½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kasparov-Short 1993]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #8     Short vs Kasparov, 1993     1/2-1/2
    · Game #4     Short vs Kasparov, 1993     0-1
    · Game #16     Short vs Kasparov, 1993     1-0

FOOTNOTES

  1. 1993 Kasparov-Short Match HIghlights by Mark Weeks

 page 1 of 1; 20 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Kasparov vs Short 1-039 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
2. Short vs Kasparov ½-½51 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
3. Kasparov vs Short 1-059 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
4. Short vs Kasparov 0-140 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB97 Sicilian, Najdorf
5. Kasparov vs Short ½-½18 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
6. Short vs Kasparov ½-½31 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
7. Kasparov vs Short 1-036 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
8. Short vs Kasparov ½-½41 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
9. Kasparov vs Short 1-052 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
10. Short vs Kasparov ½-½43 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
11. Kasparov vs Short ½-½50 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC45 Scotch Game
12. Short vs Kasparov ½-½40 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
13. Kasparov vs Short ½-½34 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
14. Short vs Kasparov ½-½39 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
15. Kasparov vs Short 1-039 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
16. Short vs Kasparov 1-038 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB87 Sicilian, Fischer-Sozin with ...a6 and ...b5
17. Kasparov vs Short ½-½41 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC45 Scotch Game
18. Short vs Kasparov ½-½33 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB87 Sicilian, Fischer-Sozin with ...a6 and ...b5
19. Kasparov vs Short ½-½26 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchC73 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense
20. Short vs Kasparov ½-½36 1993 Kasparov - Short World Championship MatchB87 Sicilian, Fischer-Sozin with ...a6 and ...b5
 page 1 of 1; 20 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-07-16  Makavelli II: The most one sided match up in the history of the world chess championship. I felt for Short at the time.
Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: I thought Short put up a good fight playing interesting; aggressive chess. No shame in that. No one would have defeated Kasparov in 1993.
Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Well, at least Short can take some solace in the knowledge that he won a game.

This fellow could not:

Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship Match (2000)

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <I felt for Short at the time.>

He had half a million pounds to soften the blow; what did you have?

Apr-07-16  Petrosianic: <Makavelli II: The most one sided match up in the history of the world chess championship. I felt for Short at the time.>

I'm eagerly awaiting the rationale for how this match was more one-sided than Lasker-Janowski III. Or Lasker-Marshall. Or Lasker-Steinitz II. Or arguably, even Lasker-Tarrasch, Carlsen-Anand I, Capablanca-Lasker or Fischer-Spassky.

I suspect it may be like one of those "All-Time" lists on whatculture.com where "All-Time" means "within the last 20 years".

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <I suspect it may be like one of those "All-Time" lists on whatculture.com where "All-Time" means "within the last 20 years".>

The delineation of ancient and modern history is marked by the advent of colour TV.

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Short never won even one strong event after 1993 for e.g. ? by strong i mean an event with 3-4 top 10 players taking part in it.>

This is a fair point. Recently, I was intending to draw together some stats on Short's record against Anand, Kramnik, Shirov, Topalov, etc. I never got round to it, but suffice to say they're pretty dire.

Apr-07-16  Olavi: <<True that after the whitewash, Short was never to be seen again at top level chess.>

I consider e.g. Riga, Novgorod and Horgen 1995, Amsterdam 1996 top level performances.

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <infinitestupidity....True that after the whitewash, Short was never to be seen again at top level chess.>

Nice story line, but the facts do not bear out your narrative.

Apr-07-16  Makavelli II: @Plang. "No one would have beaten Kasparov in 1993

Adams vs Kasparov, 1993

;)

Apr-07-16  Petrosianic: You just shot yourself in the foot:

Short vs Kasparov, 1993

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Lambda: <Short never won even one strong event after 1993 for e.g. ? by strong i mean an event with 3-4 top 10 players taking part in it.>

That's a very high bar to clear, quite a few world champions only did this a few times in their careers.

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Using that standard to denigrate the merits of any player who has got so far as to challenge even once for the title, used in this context, is hopelessly self-serving; for such performances require <any> player to perform well above expectation.
Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: <Makavelli II: @Plang. "No one would have beaten Kasparov in 1993>

I meant in a match

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Not to mention in a serious game, a field in which Kasparov owned yet another <pretty> good player, what with his lifetime mark of +10 =8 in classical play against the English GM.
Apr-08-16  Chessinfinite: <but the facts do not bear out your narrative.>

what did i just show ? Zero tournament wins - not including wins at Open events such as Gibraltar or 'common'wealth. I don't know if we should go back to the 80s to find a tournament win for Short, but that will be some searching to be done.

Apr-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Lambda: It is actually true that Short's tournament wins before his WC match are more impressive than afterwards:

Reykjavik, 1987 ahead of Timman, Tal, Korchnoi, Portisch and Ljubojevic

Amsterdam 1991, equal with Salov, ahead of Karpov, Kasparov, Korchnoi and Timman

Wijk aan Zee 1987, ahead of Korchnoi and Ljubojevic

Amsterdam 1988, ahead of Karpov, Timman and Ljubojevic

Apr-08-16  Retireborn: <Lambda> I'm not sure I agree; Tallin/Parnu 1998 (category 15), British ch 1998 (2700+ performance), Pamplona 1999/2000 (cat 15), Beijing 2000 (cat 16) and Budapest 2003 (cat 17) are surely at least as impressive.

It's true he didn't get many invitations to super-prestigious tournaments in those years, possibly because Michael Adams had replaced him as the top-rated British player.

Still, I suppose Short's peak achievement was his match victory over Karpov in 1992; something which a formidable array of other Grandmasters could not achieve.

Apr-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Lambda: <Still, I suppose Short's peak achievement was his match victory over Karpov in 1992; something which a formidable array of other Grandmasters could not achieve.>

That's certainly true. In other WC-relevant matches against players not called "Kasparov", only Korchnoi twice, Yusupov and Anand were even able to come close to Karpov, while he crushed Polugaevsky, Spassky, Korchnoi once, Sokolov, (Hjartarson match was a bit short,) Timman twice, Gelfand and Kamsky. Short beating him by two clear points really stands out.

Apr-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: < <Lambda> I'm not sure I agree; Tallin/Parnu 1998 (category 15), British ch 1998 (2700+ performance), Pamplona 1999/2000 (cat 15), Beijing 2000 (cat 16) and Budapest 2003 (cat 17) are surely at least as impressive.>

Which then top 10 players did he beat in those events?

Apr-08-16  Retireborn: <MissS> In those tournaments he defeated Gelfand, Lautier, Timman, Judit Polgar, Speelman, Andersson, Sadler, Ehlvest ao.

Not that I know if any of them were top 10 at the time, but the point is post-93 there were a much larger number of very strong players, not that Short suddenly got weaker.

Apr-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Not that I know if any of them were top 10 at the time, but the point is post-93 there were a much larger number of very strong players, not that Short suddenly got weaker.>

Which actually argues in favour of the claim that Short was the weakest WC challenger since, well, David Janowski.

Apr-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Retireborn....Still, I suppose Short's peak achievement was his match victory over Karpov in 1992; something which a formidable array of other Grandmasters could not achieve.>

This was most impressive, the more so given that, redoubtable as Karpov was at tournament play, he could generally only be defeated in match play by the single player superior to him from the mid 1980s into the 1990s.

Apr-08-16  Olavi: I'll give exact results of the tournaments I mentioned. He didn't win any of them, but +2 in this Company, finishing a full point ahead of Kasparov in one ty... judge for yourself.

http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/... http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/... http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/... http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/...

Apr-13-16  Chessinfinite: After the match, Short was involved in pussy bashing most of the time - maybe trying to find he lost morale..

At one time, he was talking so much about it, that i thought he might challenge the world women champion - But unfortunately for him, Judith Polgar was still around. Maybe he would probably end up with the same fate as in 1993.

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