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Kasparov vs Anand, 1995
New York City

Although stripped of his title by FIDE for holding his 1993 match with Short outside the world chess body's auspices, Kasparov was nevertheless widely considered the legitimate World Champion. The Professional Chess Association (PCA) created by Kasparov held a series of a series of candidate matches to choose an opponent for him. Viswanathan Anand succeeded in becoming the champions opponent.

 Kasparov vs Anand
 Kasparov and Anand play above New York City
Anand's rise in the chess world was meteoric. Born in India he quickly emerged as his nation's greatest player. At age fifteen, he became the youngest Indian to win the Intrnational Master title. At the age of sixteen he was crowned India's National Champion. In 1987 he was the first Indian to win the World Junior Championship. In 1988, at the age of eighteen, he became the first official Grandmaster of India. Anand qualified for the PCA World Championship final by winning the candidates matches against Michael Adams and Gata Kamsky. [1]

The 1995 PCA title match was played on the Observation Deck on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center in New York City. The prize fund was 1,500,000 US$, with 2/3 for the winner. Ten percent of the fund would to go to the PCA. In case of a tied match, Kasparov would retain the PCA title, but the prize would be split. The match was to last 20 games instead of the traditional 24, each game played at 40 moves in 2 hours, then 20 moves in 1 hour, followed by 30 minutes to complete the game, There were to be no timeouts and no adjournments.

The match started with eight straight draws (a record for the opening of a world championship match) until Anand drew first blood by winning game nine. This victory was not to be enjoyed for very long, as Kasparov then rebounded by dominantly winning four of the next five games.

After 18 games, with a final score of 10½ to 7½ Kasparov retained the PCA World Chess Champion title.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718
Anand½½½½½½½½100½00½½½½
Kasparov½½½½½½½½011½11½½½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kasparov 10½;  Anand 7½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kasparov-Anand 1995]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #10     Kasparov vs Anand, 1995     1-0
    · Game #9     Anand vs Kasparov, 1995     1-0
    · Game #11     Anand vs Kasparov, 1995     0-1

FOOTNOTES

  1. Wikipedia: Viswanathan Anand

 page 1 of 1; 18 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½27 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
2. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½29 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
3. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½36 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
4. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½21 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchA17 English
5. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½27 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
6. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½28 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
7. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½25 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
8. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½22 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC45 Scotch Game
9. Anand vs Kasparov 1-035 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
10. Kasparov vs Anand 1-038 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
11. Anand vs Kasparov 0-131 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB78 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long
12. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½43 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC78 Ruy Lopez
13. Anand vs Kasparov 0-125 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB77 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
14. Kasparov vs Anand 1-041 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB01 Scandinavian
15. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½20 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
16. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½16 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB76 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
17. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½63 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB77 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
18. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½12 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
 page 1 of 1; 18 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-30-07  Timex: Once upon a time, Anand was playing Kasparov for the world title. He sat down and suddenly--- ............a crack in the floor appeared.
Kasparov asked, "Have you been gaining weight lately?" Anand blushes and answers, "Oh yes."
Kasparov replies, "Don't tell me you are 400 pounds." Anand, "Oh, I am even better. I am 500 pounds."
Immediately, the floor cracks and both of them fall through 107 floors of the World Trade Center. Note: This is probably what caused the World Trade Center's potential 9/11. :) Anand looks fat in the pic.
Jul-31-07  chessblind: <Timex> If Anand is obese,(your estimate is 500 Pounds) then how about Kramnik?Where will you place him so that the earth under him does not give away?
Jul-31-07  Davolni: I wonder if the picture is real. They really played under the sun? with that view?
Aug-01-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sui Generis: The picture is just promotional, the actual games were played under normal conditions. You can find videos of games 8, 9 and 10 at YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0Qh...

Aug-27-07  contra: Yusupov's ideas worked wonders for Kasparov in this match.
Dec-24-07  mistreaver: I wonder what would have happened if Anand used Scandinavian in the 10th game after he took the lead. It would certainly be more effective and would put Garry in hard situation.
Jul-08-08  Jim Bartle: "The match started with eight straight draws (a record for the opening of a world championship match)"

Providing lots of fodder for David Letterman, who joked about the high drama of the match.

Sep-22-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Without a doubt one of the very worst matches in history. Definitely the worst World Championship match EVER.
Sep-22-08  anandrulez: The thing about this dual is that the play was veyr much theory oriented and none actually wanted to deviate from it . When Anand won , Kaspy struck back with vengance . Anand never recovered from that . The quality of Anands games were much below his par . I think after 2000 Anand really squared up with Kaspy though .
Oct-17-08  Akuni: <offramp: Without a doubt one of the very worst matches in history. Definitely the worst World Championship match EVER.>

Says the kibitzer who lists James Mason as his favorite player...

Oct-20-08  VaselineTopLove: It doesn't seem to me that Anand had a Plan B for the second half of the match, like Kasparov did (such as playing the Dragon with black). Anand continued playing the same openings after game 10 which he had been playing from game 1. So there was no surprise element from Anand's side, except for game 14 when he used the Scandinivian, but I doubt that he seriously considered employing it in all his black games, as he switched to more conventional openings after his loss with the Scandinivian. So I don't think he had prepared it that thoroughly.

His decision to play 1...d5 may have been caused by a) desperation b) get Kasparov on unfamiliar territory c) play a one off, off-beat game because your seconds found a novelty, or a good, promising continuation - unfortunately for Anand, he was unable to convert the advantage he obtained and lost instead.

So the Scandinivian seems more like a one-off game, rather than a thoroughly prepared Plan B.

Oct-21-08  VaselineTopLove: You can't compare Kasparov's 4-1 thrashing of Anand in 1995 to Anand's thrashing of Kramnik now. Back in 1995, an inexperienced Anand was playing a mature and seasoned Kasparov and most of Anand's losses came in the second half after a tough first half, and that too when played over 18 games.

Here both Kramnik and Anand are seasoned enough and were considered equal before the match, but no one expected a 3-0 in the first 6 games!

Oct-21-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: It almost feels like this match was 13 years ago or something.
Oct-21-08  Hesam7: And the match was not as bad for Anand as the result indicates or people make it out be. I have said this before, he forced Kasparov to abandon Najdorf!
Nov-25-08  Ladolcevita: Old picture always looks so beautiful
Oct-26-09  Jim Bartle: Sports Illustrated's report on the match:

In a soundproof glass cage a quarter of a mile above Wall Street, a couple of cavemen named Garry Kasparov and Viswanathan Anand spent the past month clubbing it out at the Intel World Chess Championship. Caveman is the chess term for a player of primitive and brutal instincts. Kasparov, the champion who treats chess as blood sport, showed he's still the game's top troglodyte by bludgeoning his opponent in the best-of-20 series.

The $1.5 million battle ($1 million goes to the winner) on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center, had promised to be the worst mismatch since Tyson-McNeeley. Kasparov, a 32-year-old Russian, was expected to pin his 25-year-old Indian challenger to the ropes early, bounce him around at will and score a quick knockout.

It didn't play out that way. For eight games Anand jabbed, probed and feinted with astonishing speed, frustrating Kasparov's best efforts and earning draws. Then Anand, the mild, jokey son of a Madras railroad executive, won the ninth game in a display of tactical genius that left his rival stunned. "You catch a tiger by the whiskers, next day he's going to be ferocious," Anand reckoned.

He was right. Kasparov mauled Anand in Game 10. And Game 11. And two of the three after that. Then, on Monday, Kasparov drew Game 17 to secure his fifth title defense since 1985. "Anand showed he could hold his own," said one grandmaster analyst. "But he's an intuitive player, and you can't beat Kasparov on intuition alone."

In the tournament's final days, the question was not whether Anand would win another game, but whether he would survive to play championship chess again after his psychological and intellectual battering. The $500,000 loser's share may help him recover. Even cavemen have to eat.

Apr-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  SharpAttack: <VaselineTopLove> I completely agree with your posts here (about Anand's opening choices and he being inexperienced) Don't you think Anand has become too predictable in his openings? I mean he finds sharp lines in the popular top-level openings but never surprises the opponents with something unusual.
Aug-31-10  garrykasparov: Wow.Even though Anand took the lead in Game 9 he lost the match.
Aug-31-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: <garrykasparov> (fan)

That's not so unique in itself, but it is interesting to think about: how can we measure the "competitive level" of a chess matches? You often hear people say things like "the match was closer than the score would indicate," or use wildly different adjectives to describe matches with similar (or even identical) final scores.

Perhaps we could start by looking at 5 things:

1. The final score of the match.

2. The number of lead changes in the match (one player taking the lead away from the other, not just breaking or establishing a tie).

3. The number of games where the loser led the match.

4. The number of games where the match was tied (post-game).

5. The most dominant "mini-match" within the match, and who won it. I'll use the longest period where one player won without answer from his opponent, trimming draws from both ends.

I'm sure there are other things, and maybe there is a way to weight/combine these into a single number. The last three items help us get around the problem of comparing matches of different lengths. For what it's worth, here are the results in the post K-K era (classical title matches):

Kasparov-Short 1993

Final Score: +5 (Kasparov)
Lead Changes: 0
Short led for 0 games
The match was tied for 0 games
Dominant stretch: 10.5/15 (+6), Kasparov (games 1-15)

Kasparov-Anand, 1995

Final Score: +3 (Kasparov)
Lead Changes: 1
Anand led for 1 game
The match was tied for 9 games
Dominant stretch: 4.5/5 (+4), Kasparov (games 10-14)

Kasparov-Kramnik 2000

Final Score: +2 (Kramnik)
Lead Changes: 0
Kasparov led for 0 games
The match was tied for 1 game
Dominant stretch: 5.5/9 (+2), Kramnik (games 2-10)

Kramnik-Leko 2004

Final Score: even, but Kramnik retained his title
Lead Changes: 1
Leko led for 6 games
The match was tied for 4 games
Dominant stretch: 3/4 (+2), Leko (games 5-8)

Kramnik-Topalov 2006

Final Score: even (official classical score)
Lead Changes: 1 (official)
Topalov led for 1 game (official)
The match was tied for 4 games
Dominant stretch: both players went 2/2, +2 (Kramnik in games 1-2, Topalov in games 8-9)

Anand-Kramnik 2008

Final Score: +2 (Anand)
Lead Changes: 0
Kramnik led for 0 games
The match was tied for 2 games
Dominant stretch: 3.5/4, +3, Anand (games 3-6)

Anand-Topalov 2010

Final Score: +1 (Anand)
Lead Changes: 1
Topalov led for 1 game
The match was tied for 6 games
Dominant stretch: 2.5/3, +2, Anand (games 2-4)

Sep-01-10  garrykasparov: <SetNoEscapeOn> Thanks for thinking that i'm not really garry kasparov.Besides,I bet he would use capital letters anyways.
May-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Akuni: <offramp: Without a doubt one of the very worst matches in history. Definitely the worst World Championship match EVER.> Says the kibitzer who lists James Mason as his favorite player...>

I can change it if you tell me who my favourite player should be.

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: < SetNoEscapeOn: <garrykasparov> (fan)

That's not so unique in itself, but it is interesting to think about: how can we measure the "competitive level" of a chess matches?>

The system you have worked out is really good. Its only fault is that you applied it to some pretty short or dull matches.

Any chance of someone extending the list backwards?

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: I can't think of a better person than you yourself :).
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: That is not likely. [Laughter.]
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