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Kasparov vs Anand, 1995
New York City

Although stripped of his title by FIDE for holding his 1993 match with Short outside the world chess body's auspices, Kasparov was nevertheless widely considered the legitimate World Champion. The Professional Chess Association (PCA) created by Kasparov held a series of a series of candidate matches to choose an opponent for him. Viswanathan Anand succeeded in becoming the champion's opponent.

 Kasparov vs Anand
 Kasparov and Anand play above New York City
Anand's rise in the chess world was meteoric. Born in India, he quickly emerged as his nation's greatest player. At age fifteen, he became the youngest Indian to win the International Master title. At the age of sixteen he was crowned India's National Champion. In 1987 he was the first Indian to win the World Junior Championship. In 1988, at the age of eighteen, he became the first official Grandmaster of India. Anand qualified for the PCA World Championship final by winning the candidates matches against Michael Adams and Gata Kamsky. [1]

The 1995 PCA title match was played on the Observation Deck on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center in New York City. The prize fund was 1,500,000 US$, with 2/3 for the winner. Ten percent of the fund would to go to the PCA. In case of a tied match, Kasparov would retain the PCA title, but the prize would be split. The match was to last 20 games instead of the traditional 24, each game played at 40 moves in 2 hours, then 20 moves in 1 hour, followed by 30 minutes to complete the game. There were to be no timeouts and no adjournments.

The match started with eight straight draws (a record for the opening of a world championship match) until Anand drew first blood by winning game nine. This victory was not to be enjoyed for very long, as Kasparov then rebounded by dominantly winning four of the next five games.

After 18 games, with a final score of 10½ to 7½ Kasparov retained the PCA World Chess Champion title.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718
Anand½½½½½½½½100½00½½½½
Kasparov½½½½½½½½011½11½½½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kasparov 10½;  Anand 7½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kasparov-Anand 1995]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #10     Kasparov vs Anand, 1995     1-0
    · Game #9     Anand vs Kasparov, 1995     1-0
    · Game #11     Anand vs Kasparov, 1995     0-1

FOOTNOTES

  1. Wikipedia: Viswanathan Anand

 page 1 of 1; 18 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½27 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
2. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½29 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
3. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½36 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
4. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½21 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchA17 English
5. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½27 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
6. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½28 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
7. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½25 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
8. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½22 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC45 Scotch Game
9. Anand vs Kasparov 1-035 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
10. Kasparov vs Anand 1-038 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
11. Anand vs Kasparov 0-131 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB78 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long
12. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½43 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchC78 Ruy Lopez
13. Anand vs Kasparov 0-125 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB77 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
14. Kasparov vs Anand 1-041 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB01 Scandinavian
15. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½20 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
16. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½16 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB76 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
17. Anand vs Kasparov ½-½63 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB77 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
18. Kasparov vs Anand ½-½12 1995 Kasparov - Anand World Championship MatchB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
 page 1 of 1; 18 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: I can't think of a better person than you yourself :).
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: That is not likely. [Laughter.]
Apr-07-15  Chessinfinite: The match was well fought, Anand could have definitely got in a couple of more wins, at least one more in game 17. I saw that game closely, and remember Anand missing 37. b4!, which would have been the best winning try, instead he chose something else that 'looked' poisonous, and required only moves from Kasparov- which to his credit Garry found, all of them!.

I would say, this was was a good start by Anand, and could have been as big as the Karpov matches earlier, had Vishy been a bit more relaxed. Garry of course was the man to beat and deserved to win this mighty battle- and no one achieved beat him for the next five years.

Oct-29-15  thegoodanarchist: Anand was a bit of a butterball back in '95, judging by the photo.
Mar-15-16  Conrad93: This match is not as awful as the Lasker vs. Marshall 1907 match.
Mar-19-16  Hawkman: This was probably the last WC where both the players considered their opinions superior to computers.
Mar-19-16  Olavi: <Hawkman: This was probably the last WC where both the players considered their opinions superior to computers.>

No, at least Kasparov-Kramnik 2000, probably later matches also. And for valid reasons. It's enough to study their opening preparation.

Apr-06-16  Chessinfinite: If you asked Kasparov, he ranked his matches as follows :

1. Kasparov vs Karpov - Tough and close
2. Kasparov vs Anand - Very interesting
3. Kasparov vs Short - Boring.

enough said by the legend himself.

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Chessinfinite: If you asked Kasparov, he ranked his matches as follows : 1. Kasparov vs Karpov - Tough and close
2. Kasparov vs Anand - Very interesting
3. Kasparov vs Short - Boring.

enough said by the legend himself.>

He is ranking this match sixth of the matches he won. That's pretty low.

Apr-07-16  Chessinfinite: no, i think he also meant the kind of opposition he faced - definitely for him, the Short match was the dullest of them all.

It was not like he was expecting to face a real challenge before the match actually began. He even predicted something like "It would be Short" - he seemed to know even before how the match would be like.

Apr-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Yes you are correct chessinfinite. I understand it now.
Apr-07-16  Chessinfinite: I am always right, thank you.
Apr-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: And welcome to a lifetime on my ignore list.
Apr-09-16  morfishine: <offramp> I love this comment: <And welcome to a lifetime on my ignore list> The difficulty in finding educated and refined people to engage in objective conversation is balanced by the joy when we find such people.

*****

Apr-09-16  Chessinfinite: sure, i grant you that 'honour' as well<offramp> and <morfishine> you can get to that list as well, to be fair i will hear you out till you deal with some other poster on other pages, where i thought, you seem to be having a hard time there defending your self proclaimed 'attack', but good luck on that.
Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Offramp.

Chessinfinite has just said that he has put you on his ignore list.

Hi Chessinfinite,

Offramp now knows you too have added him to your ignore list.

Hi Offramp,

I've just told Chessinfinite you now know you are on Chessinfinite's ignore list.

Hi Chessinfinite,

Offramp is now aware he is on your ignore list and that I have told you that he knows.

Phew!

Apr-10-16  morfishine: <Sally Simpson> hahahahahahahahahahhah
Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <morfishine: <Sally Simpson> hahahahahahahahahahhah>

What did <Sally Simpson> say? :-)

Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <In the tournament's final days, the question was not whether Anand would win another game, but whether he would survive to play championship chess again after his psychological and intellectual battering. The $500,000 loser's share may help him recover. Even cavemen have to eat.>

Seems to me Anand fared right well in the aftermath of this match; for he is still playing top-level chess and managed to get to the top after all.

Apr-10-16  Chessinfinite: Really.. what did Sally say ? lol
Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Absentee: Sports Illustrated must love drama and hyperbole.
Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Morf,

If you can see this please tell Chessinfinite and offramp what I said.

If you cannot see it then just ignore it.

---

Kasparov - Anand match was a battle of the backroom boys (seonds) some wonderful chess played in that match.

If you want the No1. most dreary match of all time then look no further than.

Anand - Gelfand World Chess Championship (2012)

Apr-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Absentee: Sports Illustrated must love drama and hyperbole.>

They covered this match in the Swimsuit Issue.

Apr-13-16  Chessinfinite: <Seems to me Anand fared right well in the aftermath of this match; for he is still playing top-level chess and managed to get to the top after all.>

yeah, how do you say it- you are damn right..

Anand spent his time getting better at Chess, maybe Short should have done the same instead of pussy bashing to boost up his ego.

Apr-15-16  thegoodanarchist: <offramp: <Absentee: Sports Illustrated must love drama and hyperbole.>

They covered this match in the Swimsuit Issue.>

The Swimsuit Issue doesn't cover much.

Just like the swimsuits themselves.

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