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MATCH STANDINGS
Candidates Match: Aronian - Carlsen Match

Levon Aronian7/12(+5 -3 =4)[games]
Magnus Carlsen5/12(+3 -5 =4)[games]

 page 1 of 1; 12 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Carlsen vs Aronian 0-1362007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenC78 Ruy Lopez
2. Aronian vs Carlsen ½-½212007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenA58 Benko Gambit
3. Carlsen vs Aronian 1-0412007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenA30 English, Symmetrical
4. Aronian vs Carlsen 1-0402007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE11 Bogo-Indian Defense
5. Carlsen vs Aronian 1-0492007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE12 Queen's Indian
6. Aronian vs Carlsen ½-½472007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
7. Aronian vs Carlsen 1-0512007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE10 Queen's Pawn Game
8. Carlsen vs Aronian 1-0842007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE12 Queen's Indian
9. Aronian vs Carlsen ½-½482007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE10 Queen's Pawn Game
10. Carlsen vs Aronian ½-½722007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenA30 English, Symmetrical
11. Aronian vs Carlsen 1-0662007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenA62 Benoni, Fianchetto Variation
12. Carlsen vs Aronian 0-1572007Candidates Match: Aronian - CarlsenE29 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
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Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Aronian is easily one of the best players in the world, and the kid pushed him to the wall -- it could have gone either way.

I expect Carlsen to be in the top 10 soon, and continue rising from there -- perhaps all the way to the top!

Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <boz: I don't agree that the Kasim-Gelfand match was better than Aronian-Carlsen just because there were fewer so-called errors. Cautious chess will always be more correct than than the high-risk kind. Preference depends on your personal measure of things.

Aronian-Carlsen was more than entertaining. It was wondrous and inspired.>

Very well said. I heartily agree.

Jun-04-07  cotdt: there were so many mistakes in this match (every game had many mistakes), and the games were all so one-sided as if they agreed to take turns beating each other up. only in a couple games did either carlsen or aronian play a good defense. i wouldn't call it high quality games.
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <Peligroso Patzer> I seriously have to ask. Have you actually LOOKED at the games of the Gelfand-Kasim match? Earlier you were bashing them for drawing according to the stupid formula that say Draws = Bad and now you agree with a comment that absurdly implies that they played "cautious chess"!?! Considering the complexity of the games in that match (with the exception of the last game I guess, much like game 2 of Carlsen-Aronian) they did indeed play very, very good chess.
Jun-04-07  boz: <acirce> Like all terms "cautious" is relative. I will argue that Aronian and Carlsen play a higher-risk style of chess than Gelfand and Kasim. That those two played very good chess is well established. You can relax...they have no need of your defence.

My difference is with people who only see errors. They follow chess as though it were a mathematical exercise instead of a sport.

I wonder too how well those masters of precision, Gelfand and Kasim, would have withstood the imaginative attacking manoeuvres executed by Carlsen before becoming confused and falling into error.

Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <I wonder too how well those masters of precision, Gelfand and Kasim, would have withstood the imaginative attacking manoeuvres executed by Carlsen before becoming confused and falling into error.>

Well, judging from these matches, they wouldn't have ended up in such bad positions right out of the opening in the first place. They also did come up with imaginative concepts in both attack and defense. I would argue that Carlsen and Aronian didn't take any higher risk than Gelfand and Kasim at all, simply for the reason that they didn't have do that to win to as the opponent put up much less resistance in those games. It's also very clear that Aronian and Carlsen played safer, more solid openings.

Jun-04-07  boz: There is more to chess than choice of opening. Kasim may well handle the opening better than Carlsen but I doubt there's a kibitzer in this room who would bet on him in a match with either Aronian or Carlsen.

But we were talking about risk. And there is actually a better word than that.

In game 5 when Carlsen gave up his c-pawn in pursuit of an attack that I can only describe as visionary, people were wondering how he was going to stop Aronian's c-pawn from advancing. Nobody was accusing Aronian of poor defence at that moment. We all watched in wonder as the idea unfolded.

To play that way takes courage. I value this higher than any scale of accuracy that can be checked with Fritz for verification.

Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: Well, I'm not saying Carlsen lacks courage and of course you have to take some kind of risk in any game to win. But as an example of great courage (rather than being a very impressive concept and one of the high points of the match in that regard) I don't know if that is a very good example - 1) he had it all calculated and even if he had missed something there was really no way he could lose, 2) he pretty much <had> to take chances to win to remain in the match, it being his last game with White. It's hardly less courageous to enter a super-sharp line leading to chaos on the board where you can easily slip and lose. But I'm not really interested in conducting a scientific, systematic comparison of the two matches, I'm just somewhat tired of hearing Carlsen-Aronian being hailed to the sky and contrasted to the "cautious" Kasim-Gelfand -- I really see no other reason for this than the latter match ending in all draws and perhaps that many people feel stronger emotionally about Carlsen and/or Aronian, neither reason being very rational. As a matter of fact Kasim and Gelfand played very high-quality AND courageous chess, so I don't really see how anyone can complain. And that's the last time I'll waste posting on this subject.
Jun-04-07  cotdt: agreed, the Kasim-Gelfand games are absolute gems, I only wished Kasim would have pushed for the win in Game 6.
Jun-04-07  slomarko: <As a matter of fact Kasim and Gelfand played very high-quality AND courageous chess, so I don't really see how anyone can complain.> for the first time ever i agree 100% with <acirce>
Jun-04-07  micartouse: I think a lot of us paid most attention to the Aronian-Carlsen match because of the popularity and star power of both players. I admit I rarely looked at the Kasimdhanov-Gelfand games because of lack of interest in the 2 players; I'm shallow as a kiddie pool. :) I feel kind of guilty now.

Fortunately, it was indeed a great match in its own way regardless of how it stacks up against the others.

Jun-05-07  TheGladiator: <acirce>

While I must admit to not having studied Gelfand's games very cautiously, I do object to comments like this:

<there were so many mistakes in this match (every game had many mistakes), and the games were all so one-sided as if they agreed to take turns beating each other up.>

Saying that Magnus-Aronian was "low quality" and Gelfand-Kasimdzhanov was "high quality" like the commentator I quoted does, makes me protest. Do _you_ agree to this quote? [I know you've said elsewhere that the match had hight quality <and> low quality "moments".]

As for the Gelfand-Kasim match: I think the picture might have been different if either of them had faced Magnus or Aronian. Here are some possible scenarios:

1) Out of respect (e.g. of Aronian) both might have played more solid openings (like Magnus/Aronian did, facing the other)

2) Magnus/Aronian might have unbalanced the games more (after the opening)

3) Aronian (and maybe also Magnus) might have "punished" the sharp play early on in the match, so as to convince Gelfand/Kasim to play more cautiously for the rest of the match. [As it was, there was no reason for either to change their openings much, but 2 of Kasim's 3 white games were rather short and tame draws, IMO.]

So, the first game(s) of a match might influence the total verdict. Magnus trailed most of the time, while Aronian was ahead most of the time. Maybe being ahead like Aronian was, made him "relax" a bit (too much), or maybe it even made him nervous...

Hard to tell what kind of psychological effects were going on to make Aronian appear (to some) as less solid than usual - but Magnus' wins were indeed excellent and intriguing end games...

Jun-05-07  Open Defence: for purely chess reasons I found the Kasim - Gelfand match more interesting... especially that first game... there were mistakes in that match (as there are in all matches) .... but what a save!
Jun-05-07  sheaf: <gelfand kasim> vs <aronian carlsen>. well aronian carlsen was indeed a good match for the kind of nerves both players showed. all the classical games were in a way strange with one side completely outplaying others in complex middle games. on the other hand i believe gelfand kasim were both very well prepared and played some sharp games. gelfand is a solid its usually not his style to play outrageous openings.
Jun-05-07  podjevsky: <TheGladiator> Why object to the low quality remark? This can only be because of your nationality and praise for a fellow countryman. Looking objectively at the two matches I don't think there is much to argue.

The Kasim - Gelfand match had high quality <from both sides> in all the games. There was a lot of tension and exciting moments.

I must fully agree with those who say that Aronian - Carlsen match was one-sided. Perhaps it is a bit harsh to call it low-quality because both players showed good technique in utilising the rather bad play from their opponent.

The tension in the Carlsen-Aronian match was more between the individual games, not in the games themselves.

As I see it, every game (with some exception) in the Gelfand-Kasim match was as exciting as the entire Aronian-Carlsen match

Jun-05-07  TheGladiator: <podjevsky>

I objected to naming one "low quality" and the other "high quality". Consider my points above, and you'll see that the verdict might have been different if Gelfand or Kasim had faced either of Aronian or Magnus. We just don't know, and as usual I think many ppl are too categorical in their remarks.

<As I see it, every game (with some exception) in the Gelfand-Kasim match was as exciting as the entire Aronian-Carlsen match>

They played 6 games, and when you use a phrase like "every game" and seem to completely forget the dull and non-game round 6 (17 moves), and white's decision to offer draw after 23 moves in the same opening in round 2 (?), where Bxh6 instead of Qxd4 would have been a try for the whole point (which someone like Magnus is very likely to have tried) - it might not win, but you got to at least try!

IMO Kasim is either low on ambition, too confident in his rapid skills, or too cautious when he doesn't want to play out that position. And of course it becomes "higher quality" (= fewer mistakes), when you just stop playing a playable and anything but lifeless position after only 23 moves... [If indeed "some exception" was meant to cover both game 2 and 6, then "every game" is a very strange and misleading phrase about 66% of the games - so I kind of expect you included the 23 move abortion in "every game".]

So, I have a really hard time believing that you find a 23 move "I don't want (dare) to play anymore" as exciting as the "entire" Aronian-Carlsen match. What is your motif or what is your background to (say you) feel that way? Fan of Kasim or Gelfand or both? :)

PS! Note that I neither deny several weak moves/mistakes in Aronian-Carlsen, or fewer similar mistakes in Gelfand-Kasim, but one non-game and one aborted when things were becoming exciting, just isn't what I prefer as a chess spectator.

And btw - in the rapids we saw the "high quality" attack when Kasim really felt he had to win a game - top level chess often is about being able to unbalance the position so as to create winning chances, without getting (much) worse in the process. And I suppose it's not like there weren't better moves available than what Gelfand and Kasim played during the match - or is also that part of the claims? Just wondering :)

Jun-05-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <Saying that Magnus-Aronian was "low quality" and Gelfand-Kasimdzhanov was "high quality" like the commentator I quoted does, makes me protest. Do _you_ agree to this quote?>

No, I wouldn't say Carlsen-Aronian was low quality. It was just uneven with its spectacular highs as well as lows. Overall, I would probably say Kasim-Gelfand was better, but I'm not sure and I don't think it's too important.

Jun-06-07  Tacticstudent: <boz: I don't agree that the Kasim-Gelfand match was better than Aronian-Carlsen just because there were fewer so-called errors. Cautious chess will always be more correct than than the high-risk kind. Preference depends on your personal measure of things. Aronian-Carlsen was more than entertaining. It was wondrous and inspired.>

I agree with you; we can compare this to the studies of Karpov's and Kasparov's games. You learn more if you study Karpov's games, he does not error often and he plays in a instrutive cautious way. If you study Kasparov's games, you learn pretty less then if you were studying Karpov's ones, but Kasparov's games are clearly more exciting and fun.

Dec-13-15  scholes: what was this match ?
Dec-13-15  scholes: How many of this were classical games ?
Dec-13-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: It was a candidates match for Mexico 2007 World Championship. Six games classical. Remembered for Carlsen always coming back after a defeat, including such a comeback in the rapid tiebreak, until eventually losing 0:2 on blitz tiebreaks.
Dec-13-15  Howard: You mean the winner got seeded into the Candidates 2007 tournament ? But what was the purpose of this match ? Couldn't either player have qualified on his own, without this match?
Dec-13-15  beatgiant: <scholes>,<Howard> You can find all the details by looking up "World Chess Championship 2007" in Wikipedia.
Dec-13-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: The 2007 Candidates WC was a tournament of eight players:

Kramnik qualified as a reigning champion.

Anand, Svidler and Morozevich qualified from the FIDE WC 2005

The remaining four players were determined by the Candidate matches, one of which is here.

The Candidates were these:

Four players from FIDE WC 2005: Leko, Adams, Polgar

Two players by rating: Shirov and Bacrot

Ten players from 2005 World Cup: Aronian, Ponomariov, Grischuk, Bareev, Gelfand, Rublevsky, Gurevich, Kamsky, Carlsen and Malakhov

The tournament consisted of two KO stages. This match was one of the first stage matches, between the top seed Aronian and the botton seed Carlsen.

Dec-13-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: bottom*
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