chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

🏆
TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Dortmund Sparkassen Tournament

Fabiano Caruana6/9(+4 -1 =4)[games]
Sergey Karjakin6/9(+3 -0 =6)[games]
Ruslan Ponomariov5.5/9(+3 -1 =5)[games]
Vladimir Kramnik5.5/9(+3 -1 =5)[games]
Arkadij Naiditsch5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Peter Leko5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Georg Meier4/9(+1 -2 =6)[games]
Daniel Grigoryevich Fridman3.5/9(+0 -2 =7)[games]
Mateusz Bartel2/9(+1 -6 =2)[games]
Jan Gustafsson1.5/9(+0 -6 =3)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Dortmund Sparkassen (2012)

The 40th Dortmund Sparkassen Chess-Meeting took place in the Dortmunder Schauspielhaus in Dortmund, Germany 13-22 July 2012. Rest day: July 18. Chief organizer: Ralf Chadt-Rausch. Players received 100 minutes for 40 moves, then 50 more minutes for the next 20 moves, then 15 more minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment from move one. Games started at 3 pm, Round 9 at 1 pm local time. Fabiano Caruana won on tiebreak (more wins) ahead of Sergey Karjakin, both with 6/9.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 Caruana 2775 * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 6 2 Karjakin 2779 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 6 3 Ponomariov 2726 1 ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 5½ 4 Kramnik 2799 0 ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 5 5 Naiditsch 2700 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 1 5 6 Leko 2730 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 1 5 7 Meier 2644 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 4 8 Fridman 2655 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 3½ 9 Bartel 2674 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 ½ * ½ 2 10 Gustafsson 2629 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1½

Category: XIX (2711). Chief arbiter: Andrzej Filipowicz

The Helmut-Kohls-Turnier (Cat. IX round robin) was won by Andrey Orlov with 7/9. The Open A swiss tournament was won by Mikhail Zaitsev ahead of Julian Scheider, both with 7.5/9.

Wikipedia: Wikipedia article: Dortmund Sparkassen Chess Meeting#2012
Dortmunder Schachschule: http://www.dortmunder-schachschule....
ChessBase: https://en.chessbase.com/post/dortm...
TeleSchach: http://teleschach.de/schachtage/dtm...
TWIC: https://theweekinchess.com/chessnew...
DSB: https://www.schachbund.de/news/fabi...
FIDE: https://ratings.fide.com/tournament...
Dylan McClain in New York Times, 28 July 2012: https://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/29/...

Previous: Dortmund Sparkassen (2011). Next: Dortmund Sparkassen (2013)

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. D G Fridman vs J Gustafsson ½-½352012Dortmund SparkassenD02 Queen's Pawn Game
2. G Meier vs M Bartel 1-0392012Dortmund SparkassenE04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
3. Leko vs Ponomariov ½-½382012Dortmund SparkassenD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
4. Caruana vs Naiditsch ½-½602012Dortmund SparkassenC45 Scotch Game
5. Karjakin vs Kramnik ½-½322012Dortmund SparkassenC45 Scotch Game
6. Ponomariov vs Caruana 1-0362012Dortmund SparkassenB30 Sicilian
7. D G Fridman vs Leko ½-½272012Dortmund SparkassenE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
8. J Gustafsson vs Kramnik 0-1272012Dortmund SparkassenE92 King's Indian
9. M Bartel vs Karjakin 0-1342012Dortmund SparkassenE12 Queen's Indian
10. Naiditsch vs G Meier ½-½532012Dortmund SparkassenA30 English, Symmetrical
11. Karjakin vs Naiditsch ½-½592012Dortmund SparkassenC67 Ruy Lopez
12. Leko vs J Gustafsson 1-0452012Dortmund SparkassenC78 Ruy Lopez
13. Kramnik vs M Bartel 1-0502012Dortmund SparkassenA25 English
14. Caruana vs D G Fridman 1-0522012Dortmund SparkassenB12 Caro-Kann Defense
15. G Meier vs Ponomariov 0-1522012Dortmund SparkassenD12 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
16. Leko vs Caruana ½-½422012Dortmund SparkassenC18 French, Winawer
17. J Gustafsson vs M Bartel ½-½352012Dortmund SparkassenD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
18. Ponomariov vs Karjakin ½-½462012Dortmund SparkassenC67 Ruy Lopez
19. D G Fridman vs G Meier ½-½322012Dortmund SparkassenE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
20. Naiditsch vs Kramnik ½-½242012Dortmund SparkassenC43 Petrov, Modern Attack
21. Caruana vs J Gustafsson 1-0352012Dortmund SparkassenC78 Ruy Lopez
22. M Bartel vs Naiditsch 0-11102012Dortmund SparkassenC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
23. Karjakin vs D G Fridman 1-0462012Dortmund SparkassenB12 Caro-Kann Defense
24. G Meier vs Leko ½-½242012Dortmund SparkassenE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
25. Kramnik vs Ponomariov ½-½372012Dortmund SparkassenD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 14 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-21-12  BUNA: <Eyal>
OK.
But you still have to spot the moment in the game, where Kramnik "lost his balance". Where he miscalculated or misjudged the position. Where his will to win, because of his former disappointment, took the better of him.
Jul-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <<Pono and Karjakin both being undefeated have even better odds of emerging as winner because they would beat Kramnik and Caruana on tiebreaks.>>

Kramnik? Yes, I suppose a six-way tie for first at 5.5/9 is a distinct possibility - it requires only that Kramnik wins and that the rest of the game are drawn.

Jul-21-12  ooda: <Kramnik? Yes, I suppose a six-way tie for first at 5.5/9 is a distinct possibility - it requires only that Kramnik wins and that the rest of the game are drawn.>

I deleted my post when I realised it was inaccurate because Kramnik is only on 4.5

Anyway should be an interesting final round regardless with Karjakin and Ponomariov being favourites to win the tournament imo.

Pairings:

Karjakin - Gustafsson
Kramnik - Meier
Bartel - Caruana
Naiditsch - Leko
Ponomariov - Fridman

Jul-21-12  fisayo123: I guess Kramnik needs to polish his king's pawn defenses ahead of the candidates now that he has lost to e4 specialists in Caruana and Karjakin. He hasn't had any luck in the Petrov and his opponents are not necessarily obliged to play the berlin endgame. Fortunately most if not all his opponents are stronger with d4 but they could target his KPOD's based on his recent showings.
Jul-21-12  BUNA: <fisayo123: I guess Kramnik needs to polish his king's pawn defenses ahead of the candidates now that he has lost to e4 specialists in Caruana and Karjakin.>

Kramnik hasn't lost to Karjakin in Dortmund.

And he has lost to Caruana somewhere in the early middlegame. Why? Good question.

Jul-21-12  fisayo123: <BUNA> I never typed he lost to Karjakin in Dortmund. <And he has lost to Caruana somewhere in the early middlegame. Why? Good question.> Im saying that Kramnik is more formidable against d4 than against e4. He could actually "win" some games against 2700+ with his Nimzo or QGD meran. He is much more comfortable with these positions as evidenced by his play in the middle-game here. Of course I might be jumping the gun a little as im sure he would fix his e4 responses come March 13th.
Jul-21-12  Chess for life: Kramnik, in true Kramnik style, is going to win his round 9 game, there's no doubt about it!
Jul-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Speaking specifically of the Berlin, Kramnik of course made it famous in his match with Kasparov; but apart from that match I don't think it was ever his main weapon in classical games against 1.e4 until the last couple of years, starting from London 2010 (he dumped the Petrov as a main weapon after the Tal Memorial that year). The more often you play something, the more chances you have to lose once in a while. According to this database Kramnik lost six classical games in the Berlin throughout all of his career, and three of them (to Karjakin, McShane & Caruana) are recent ones.
Jul-21-12  fisayo123: Now that you put it that way <Eyal>, hehe.
Jul-21-12  csmath: What is interesting is that Kramnik has a lot of problems handling games against Karjakin and Caruana. Lost 4, won none. The young players have little respect for him, it seems.

This particular game showed Caruana avoiding Berlin then taking aggressive middlegame without hesitation. Caruana missed tactical kill just before regulation. He is obviously not afraid of Kramnik's positional prowess.

Jul-21-12  niemzo: Speaking of the Petrov, what happened to it? I haven't seen it in a while. Is it a trend or did people find a way to get play in it?
Jul-21-12  mrbasso: <Chess for life>
Not sure about that. He needs to strike back but does he have the energy?
Jul-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <csmath: What is interesting is that Kramnik has a lot of problems handling games against Karjakin and Caruana. Lost 4, won none. *** >

Your tally presumably includes 2 losses each to Karjakin and Caruana, but it seems that Kramnik’s cumulative record against these two opponents is actually even a little worse than this.

This page: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... currently gives the score between Karjakin and Kramnik in classical games as being in Karjakin’s favor by +2 -0 =6. The following three games, however (all won by Karjakin), all appear to have been played at a classical time control, so it seems that Kramnik actally has 3 losses to him:

Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2004
Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2010
Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2011

Jul-21-12  Marmot PFL: <niemzo> Kramnik played the Petrov against Naiditsch, and drew easily. He might think he needs to vary his openings more, or just got tired of it.
Jul-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Kramnik stopped using the Petrov as a main weapon after the Tal Memorial 2010 where he got into serious trouble with it in two games - vs. Karjakin (which he lost) and Nakamura (which he barely managed to draw), so it stands to reason his decision to switch to the Berlin had something to do with that. Both games were played in the 5.Nc3 ("Nimzo-Petrov") line, where apparently various dangerous ideas have been found for White; Gelfand, who used to be the opening's other major practitioner, also experienced problems in several of his later Petrov games in this line. But it may still be perfectly playable with renewed preparation efforts.
Jul-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <The following three games, however (all won by Karjakin), all appear to have been played at a classical time control, so it seems that Kramnik actally has 3 losses to him:

Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2004
Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2010
Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2011>

The Karjakin win from 2004 isn't classical, it was played in a blitz or rapid tournament. It's interesting, though, that Karjakin actually came very close to beating Kramnik in a classical game they played in Dortmund that year (when Karjakin was only 14): Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2004.

Jul-21-12  AuN1: i wish kramnik would just grow a pair and go back to playing the sicilian defense. he had some great results with it.
Jul-21-12  Shams: <Eyal> <But it may still be perfectly playable with renewed preparation efforts.>

It's tremendously satisfying to see the Petroff on its back foot for once, I have to say.

Jul-21-12  tarraschfan: So far the tournament is proceeeding as expected. I wonder why Germany cannot produce someone like Caruana, Carlsen or Nakumara. The last strong player who belonged to the world elite was Huebner, but, of course, he wasn't worldchampion material. I guess one has to go back to Lasker. Very strange. 80 Million people and no talent whatsover for decades. What is wrong with this country?
Jul-21-12  csmath: Karjakin has clearly the easiest job to win the tournament now. His opponent is Gustafsson who is clearly not suited for this competition and Karjakin plays white pieces. Unless some striking surprise he should win this tournament by beating Gustafsson.

Pono has relatively easy job against Fridman as well.

Jul-22-12  Dr Esenville: Fridman - Naiditsch 0-1
Jul-22-12  niemzo: Thanks for the answers, especially to Eyal.
Jul-22-12  Isbjorn: Impressive performance by Caruana against Kramnik!

Has Kramnik lost a little bit of his precision? I think he may have been the player who most consistently found the moves evaluated as best by Stockfish/Houdini at depth 18-20, with Carlsen not far behind.

Jul-22-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bobby Fiske: Dont forget Naiditsch outstanding performance, on pair with the worlds elite players with just one round to go!
Jul-22-12  Jim Bartle: Well, Naiditsch has drawn four of the "big five," with only Leko to go. As far as I can tell, not a single one of the bottom five has defeated one of the top five yet.
Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 14)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 14 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC