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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Moscow Tournament

Jose Raul Capablanca13/18(+8 -0 =10)[games]
Mikhail Botvinnik12/18(+7 -1 =10)[games]
Salomon Flohr9.5/18(+5 -4 =9)[games]
Andre Lilienthal9/18(+3 -3 =12)[games]
Viacheslav Ragozin8.5/18(+3 -4 =11)[games]
Emanuel Lasker8/18(+3 -5 =10)[games]
Grigory Levenfish7.5/18(+2 -5 =11)[games]
Erich Eliskases7.5/18(+2 -5 =11)[games]
Ilia Abramovich Kan7.5/18(+2 -5 =11)[games]
Nikolai Nikolaevich Riumin7.5/18(+2 -5 =11)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Moscow (1936)

Following the successes in international tournaments of Moscow (1925) and Moscow (1935), Nikolai Vasilyevich Krylenko again sought to stun the chess world and the Soviet Union with a third international event between Soviet masters and their foreign counterparts. This time, however, he conceived of a more rigorous format, with the ten players (five Soviets and five foreigners) in a double round robin competition. The lineup was impressive, with Capablanca and Lasker being invited back a third time to compete in Moscow, in addition to the previous year's winners, Botvinnik and Flohr. The tournament was held in Moscow's famous Hall of Columns from May 14 to June 8. Capablanca's near flawless accuracy and superiority in the endgame proved to be instrumental in winning first prize by a full point over the future world champion Botvinnik. Lasker, who had always finished ahead of his successor to the crown in prior tournaments, started out strongly, but at 67 years of age he became fatigued more easily and his performance suffered during the second cycle. The tournament brought immense excitement and interest, both to the citizens of the Soviet Union and to the greater world at large. Capablanca's first place was to be one of the last successes against the Soviet Chess School before the triumph of Robert James Fischer 36 years later. It was also the last hurrah for Krylenko, the founder and organizer of the tournament. He was arrested in January 1938, tried and executed later that year.

Moscow, Soviet Union (Russia), 14 May - 8 June 1936

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Pts 1 Capablanca ** 1½ ½½ 1½ 1½ ½1 ½½ ½1 ½1 11 13 2 Botvinnik 0½ ** ½1 1½ ½1 ½1 ½½ ½½ 11 ½1 12 3 Flohr ½½ ½0 ** ½1 0½ ½1 ½0 11 0½ ½1 9½ 4 Lilienthal 0½ 0½ ½0 ** ½½ ½1 ½1 ½½ ½1 ½½ 9 5 Ragozin 0½ ½0 1½ ½½ ** 1½ 1½ ½0 0½ ½½ 8½ 6 Lasker ½0 ½0 ½0 ½0 0½ ** ½1 1½ ½½ 1½ 8 =7 Levenfish ½½ ½½ ½1 ½0 0½ ½0 ** 10 ½½ ½0 7½ =7 Eliskases ½0 ½½ 00 ½½ ½1 0½ 01 ** ½½ ½½ 7½ =7 Kan ½0 00 1½ ½0 1½ ½½ ½½ ½½ ** 0½ 7½ =7 Riumin 00 ½0 ½0 ½½ ½½ 0½ ½1 ½½ 1½ ** 7½

Original collection : Game Collection: Moscow 1936, by User: suenteus po 147.

 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 90  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Flohr vs Riumin  ½-½311936MoscowA95 Dutch, Stonewall
2. Levenfish vs Lilienthal  ½-½341936MoscowD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
3. Capablanca vs Kan ½-½391936MoscowE43 Nimzo-Indian, Fischer Variation
4. Lasker vs Botvinnik ½-½371936MoscowC01 French, Exchange
5. Ragozin vs E Eliskases ½-½671936MoscowA14 English
6. Flohr vs Capablanca ½-½451936MoscowD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
7. Kan vs Ragozin 1-0581936MoscowB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
8. Lilienthal vs Lasker ½-½201936MoscowD62 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
9. Riumin vs Botvinnik ½-½801936MoscowC90 Ruy Lopez, Closed
10. E Eliskases vs Levenfish 0-1651936MoscowA28 English
11. Capablanca vs Riumin 1-0271936MoscowA53 Old Indian
12. Lasker vs E Eliskases 1-0441936MoscowC14 French, Classical
13. Levenfish vs Kan  ½-½461936MoscowE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
14. Botvinnik vs Lilienthal 1-0441936MoscowA15 English
15. Ragozin vs Flohr 1-0351936MoscowD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
16. E Eliskases vs Botvinnik  ½-½301936MoscowE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
17. Riumin vs Lilienthal  ½-½281936MoscowA06 Reti Opening
18. Capablanca vs Ragozin 1-0631936MoscowE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
19. Flohr vs Levenfish ½-½801936MoscowD42 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch, 7.Bd3
20. Kan vs Lasker  ½-½421936MoscowD66 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
21. Ragozin vs Riumin ½-½181936MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
22. Lilienthal vs E Eliskases  ½-½611936MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
23. Levenfish vs Capablanca ½-½331936MoscowD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
24. Lasker vs Flohr ½-½211936MoscowB05 Alekhine's Defense, Modern
25. Botvinnik vs Kan 1-0401936MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 90  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <'Sleep is extremely important to a chess player,'> Mikhail Botvinnik said. <'When I was young I slept wonderfully, but dur­ing the third Moscow international tournament of 1936 it was so hot and the streets were so noisy all the time that I lost sleep. But I was 25 and I could play well despite the lack of sleep, I forced myself to play.'>

Source: Genna Sosonko, 'Smart Chip from St.Petersburg and other tales of a bygone chess era', New in Chess 2006, p.38

Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: These gentlement (Flohr, Ragozin, Kan, Riumin) losing to Botvinnik in the second half of the tournament.............. Didn't prevent Capa from winning

But then, Botvinnik was already one of the best at the time Probably only second to the one (and only) who won this tournament

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < ZonszeinP: These gentlement (Flohr, Ragozin, Kan, Riumin) losing to Botvinnik in the second half of the tournament.............. Didn't prevent Capa from winning But then, Botvinnik was already one of the best at the time Probably only second to the one (and only) who won this tournament>

Why second?

Moscow (1935)

Nottingham (1936)

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: No way Capablanca was the strongest player in the world in 1936.

Alekhine? Botvinnik? Euwe?

Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: <keypusher> the second of your examples doesn't impress me. Capa lost a game to Flohr mainly because Euwe was interfering with his focusing (and also, because Flohr played very well. True) Hadn't he lost that game (which I believe could have been drawn) then he wouldn't have shared first with Botvinnik...(But won alone) Last: I would kindly refer you to my several concecutives dots in my kibbitz.... During those tormentous years, any Russian could throw some games to Botvinnik...(I am not 100% sure about that though. Have to admit)

And <plang>: Alekhine didn't give a return match to Capa, simply, because he was frighten!!

Thank you

Feb-23-17  ughaibu: You realise that Flohr wasn't a Soviet in 1936?
Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: Good point!
I prefer them not to throw a game at all!
Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: Riumin was an excellent player.
I believe he even beat Capablanca once.
I regret.
I don't really believe he lost to Botvinnik without a real fight.
Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <ZonszeinP: <keypusher> the second of your examples doesn't impress me. Capa lost a game to Flohr mainly because Euwe was interfering with his focusing (and also, because Flohr played very well. True) Hadn't he lost that game (which I believe could have been drawn) then he wouldn't have shared first with Botvinnik...(But won alone)>

Very tiresome, these excuses every time Capablanca loses. If he'd listened to Euwe he would have realized that he'd reached the time control and not made his losing blunder on move 37. But Flohr had already missed a chance to finish him off.

Capablanca and Botvinnik finished at Nottingham with 10 points each. Euwe, Fine, and Reshevsky were just a half point behind. Alekhine was just a half point behind that group. Flip the result for any of a dozen games among that group (for example, Alekhine giving away his game to Capablanca) and the standings change completely.

In short, <Euwe cost Capablanca the tournament> is another stupid chess myth.

<Last: I would kindly refer you to my several concecutives dots in my kibbitz.... During those tormentous years, any Russian could throw some games to Botvinnik...(I am not 100% sure about that though. Have to admit)>

You didn't even know that Flohr was Czech? I'm guessing you don't know what Botvinnik's overall score was against Ragozin, Kan, and Riumin, either.

You want to see a point being given away at Moscow 1936?

Capablanca vs Riumin, 1936

You want another?

Botvinnik vs Capablanca, 1936

As long as we're changing the results of games, can we give Botvinnik 28.Qa5 -- and the tournament?

Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: I knew very well that Flohr was an Ukrainian who became Czech. I admitted already that I shouldn't have include him among the Soviets in 1936.

And thank you for all the other lessons...

Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: And BTW, I knew about Salo Flohr background even before this website ever existed
Feb-23-17  ZonszeinP: Even before I ever saw a computer in my whole life! Or even knew they existed!
I already knew about Salo Flohr

Thanks

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