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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Moscow Tournament

Mikhail Botvinnik13/19(+9 -2 =8)[games]
Salomon Flohr13/19(+7 -0 =12)[games]
Emanuel Lasker12.5/19(+6 -0 =13)[games]
Jose Raul Capablanca12/19(+7 -2 =10)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann11/19(+6 -3 =10)[games]
Ilia Abramovich Kan10.5/19(+7 -5 =7)[games]
Grigory Levenfish10.5/19(+6 -4 =9)[games]
Andre Lilienthal10/19(+4 -3 =12)[games]
Viacheslav Ragozin10/19(+6 -5 =8)[games]
Peter Arsenievich Romanovsky10/19(+6 -5 =8)[games]
Vladimir Alatortsev9.5/19(+5 -5 =9)[games]
Viktor Arsentievich Goglidze9.5/19(+4 -4 =11)[games]
Ilya Leontievich Rabinovich9.5/19(+6 -6 =7)[games]
Nikolai Nikolaevich Riumin9.5/19(+7 -7 =5)[games]
Georgy Lisitsin9/19(+4 -5 =10)[games]
Fedor Parfenovich Bohatirchuk8/19(+2 -5 =12)[games]
Gideon Stahlberg8/19(+5 -8 =6)[games]
Vasja Pirc7.5/19(+3 -7 =9)[games]
Vitaly Chekhover5.5/19(+3 -11 =5)[games]
Vera Menchik1.5/19(+0 -16 =3)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Moscow (1935)
Ten years after the Moscow (1925) tournament and following on from the Botvinnik - Flohr Match (1933), Nikolai Vasilyevich Krylenko, the head of Soviet Chess, decided it was time to test its progress against its Western counterpart. To this end, eight foreign masters, including two former World Champions, were invited to pit their skills against twelve Soviet masters in early 1935. The tournament opened on the 14th of February and finished on the 15th of March and was held in the Museum Of Fine Arts in Moscow. The joint winners were Botvinnik and Flohr. The 66-year-old Dr Emanuel Lasker was undefeated and finished just half a point behind them, a result hailed as "a biological miracle". This was to be his last great tournament performance. He finished half a point ahead of his great rival Jose Capablanca, whom he brilliantly defeated in their game. This tournament showed that the Soviets, led by Botvinnik, were well on their way to becoming a major chess power.

B F L C S K L L R R A G R R L B S P C M Pts Botvinnik * ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 13 Flohr ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ 13 Lasker ½ ½ * 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 12½ Capablanca ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 12 Spielmann 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 11 Kan 1 ½ 0 0 ½ * ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 ½ ½ 1 10½ Levenfish 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 10½ Lilienthal ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 10 Ragozin 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 * 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 10 Romanovsky 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 10 Alatortsev ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ * 0 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 9½ Goglidze 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 9½ Rabinovich ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ 0 1 ½ * 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 9½ Riumin 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 1 * 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 9½ Lisitsin ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 1 * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 9 Bohatirchuk 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 * ½ ½ 0 ½ 8 Stahlberg 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 1 8 Pirc ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 1 7½ Chekhover 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 * 1 5½ Menchik 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 * 1½

Allocation Of Prizes:

- Foreign Players

Flohr 400 dollars
Lasker 250 dollars
Capablanca 150 dollars
Spielmann 100 dollars
Lilienthal 1000 rubles

- Soviet Players

Botvinnik 5000 rubles
Levenfish 2250 rubles
Kan 2250 rubles
Ragozin 1000 rubles
Romanovsky 1000 rubles

Special Izvestiya Prizes:

Ragozin - best result against foreign masters (6 out of 8)

Flohr - best result against Soviet masters (8½ out of 12)

Capablanca - best result against Soviet masters (8½ out of 12)

As a result of finishing joint first, The All-Union Committee for Physical Culture awarded the title of grandmaster to Mikhail Botvinnik. He also received a car from The People's Commissariat Of Heavy Industry.

Best Games of the Tournament:

=1st Lasker for his game against Capablanca
=1st Botvinnik for his game against Riumin

3rd Spielmann for his game against Chekhover

=4th Riumin for his game against Rabinovich
=4th Ragozin for his game against Lilienthal

=6th Capablanca for his game against Ragozin
=6th Levenfish for his game against Bohatirchuk.

The Moscow (1936) event followed the year after.

The main source for this collection was The Second International Chess Tournament Moscow 1935 book published by Caissa Editions. ISBN 0-939433-52-4.

Original Collection: Game Collection: Moscow 1935, by User: Benzol.

 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 190  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Goglidze vs Flohr 0-1291935MoscowE60 King's Indian Defense
2. Pirc vs F Bohatirchuk  ½-½401935MoscowD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
3. Ragozin vs Chekhover  ½-½221935MoscowB14 Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack
4. Kan vs Lasker 0-1501935MoscowD14 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Exchange Variation
5. Alatortsev vs I Rabinovich  0-1341935MoscowD28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
6. Lisitsin vs Lilienthal  ½-½311935MoscowA09 Reti Opening
7. Botvinnik vs Spielmann 1-0121935MoscowB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
8. Riumin vs Capablanca 1-0291935MoscowE37 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
9. P Romanovsky vs Stahlberg 1-0621935MoscowA06 Reti Opening
10. Levenfish vs Menchik 1-0251935MoscowC13 French
11. Flohr vs Lisitsin 1-0341935MoscowE46 Nimzo-Indian
12. Menchik vs Riumin 0-1261935MoscowA04 Reti Opening
13. I Rabinovich vs Goglidze  ½-½611935MoscowD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
14. Spielmann vs Alatortsev 1-0381935MoscowA47 Queen's Indian
15. P Romanovsky vs Levenfish  ½-½301935MoscowB18 Caro-Kann, Classical
16. Lilienthal vs Ragozin 0-1471935MoscowE24 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
17. Stahlberg vs Lasker ½-½261935MoscowD56 Queen's Gambit Declined
18. Chekhover vs Pirc 0-1381935MoscowD48 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran
19. Capablanca vs Botvinnik ½-½241935MoscowD90 Grunfeld
20. F Bohatirchuk vs Kan  0-1291935MoscowC42 Petrov Defense
21. Botvinnik vs Menchik 1-0381935MoscowA34 English, Symmetrical
22. Alatortsev vs Capablanca 0-1231935MoscowD53 Queen's Gambit Declined
23. Riumin vs P Romanovsky  1-0381935MoscowE36 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
24. Ragozin vs Flohr ½-½361935MoscowB18 Caro-Kann, Classical
25. Lisitsin vs I Rabinovich 1-0351935MoscowA09 Reti Opening
 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 190  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-21-13  cannedpawn: So, how much was 5000 rubles at that time?
Jul-21-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: About $75,000 in today's US currency.
May-19-14  Conrad93: Lasker must have been 65-66 in this tournament.

It's amazing to go undefeated in such a strong tournament at that age...

And was only half a point away from second place.

What a beast!

May-19-14  Strelets: 66, in poverty since his investment in German war bonds during World War I returned nothing, forced to immigrate by the rise of National Socialism, and finally arriving in Stalin's USSR just in time for the purges. And yet he finished undefeated, beating Capa and drawing Botvinnik and Flohr. Small wonder that Korchnoi is on record as calling Dr. Lasker "my chess hero."
May-19-14  Strelets: On top of all of this, he was a mathematician who worked on abstract algebra and game theory. Chess, interestingly enough, was not his only game either. A recent German biography has a chapter entitled »Nicht nur Schach Emanuel Lasker als Bridgespieler« (Not only Chess: Emanuel Lasker as Bridge Player) and it reveals that he was an outstanding contract bridge player. The book is called »Emanuel Lasker Denker Weltenbürger Schachweltmeister« (Thinker, World Citizen, World Chess Champion) Richard Forster, Stefan Hansen, Michael Negele, eds. (Berlin, 2009)
May-19-14  Conrad93: Hr also wrote a play, wrote some unsuccessful philosophical works, and was apparently a world-class bridge player.

There was no limit to his talents apparently.

May-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Strelets> fyi http://www.lasker-gesellschaft.de/
May-19-14  Strelets: <whiteshark> Vielen Dank!
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