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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Brussels World Cup Tournament

Anatoly Karpov11/16(+7 -1 =8)[games]
Valery Salov10/16(+4 -0 =12)[games]
Ljubomir Ljubojevic9.5/16(+5 -2 =9)[games]
John Nunn9.5/16(+4 -1 =11)[games]
Alexander Beliavsky9.5/16(+5 -2 =9)[games]
Ulf Andersson9/16(+2 -0 =14)[games]
Lajos Portisch9/16(+4 -2 =10)[games]
Jonathan Speelman8.5/16(+3 -2 =11)[games]
Andrei Sokolov8/16(+4 -4 =8)[games]
Mikhail Tal7.5/16(+3 -4 =9)[games]
Predrag Nikolic7.5/16(+2 -3 =11)[games]
Jan Timman7.5/16(+3 -4 =9)[games]
Yasser Seirawan7.5/16(+3 -4 =9)[games]
Jesus Nogueiras7/16(+2 -4 =10)[games]
Viktor Korchnoi6.5/16(+3 -6 =7)[games]
Gyula Sax6/16(+2 -6 =8)[games]
Luc Winants2.5/16(+1 -12 =3)[games]
Rafael Vaganian2/4(+0 -0 =4)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Brussels World Cup (1988)

The World Cup of 1988-1989 was an effort by the Grandmasters' Association (GMA) to establish a tournament circult of lucrative events for top grandmasters. Six events were held in all: Brussels 1988 (April 1-22), Game Collection: Belfort World Cup 1988 (June 14-July 3), Game Collection: Reykjavik World Cup 1988 (October 3-24), Game Collection: Barcelona World Cup 1989 (March 20-April 20), Game Collection: Rotterdam World Cup 1989 (June 3-24), and Game Collection: Skelleftea World Cup 1989 (August 12-September 3). Special thanks to <suenteus po 147> for quickly building collections for these tournaments.

The twenty-five invited players were: Ulf Andersson, Alexander Beliavsky, Jaan Ehlvest, Johann Hjartarson, Robert Huebner, Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, Viktor Korchnoi, Ljubomir Ljubojevic, Predrag Nikolic, Jesus Nogueiras, John Nunn, Lajos Portisch, Zoltan Ribli, Valery Salov, Gyula Sax, Yasser Seirawan, Nigel Short, Andrei Sokolov, Boris Spassky, Jonathan Speelman, Mikhail Tal, Jan Timman, Rafael Vaganian, and Artur Yusupov. Each played in four of the six events, with his best three results counting in the World Cup standings.

At Brussels, 17 World Cup players were invited, with 'local player' Luc Winants participating to provide an even number of players. However, Vaganian withdrew after four rounds due to the death of his brother. The games (draws against Tal, Portisch, Beliavsky, and Timman) are given in the collection, but do not appear in the tournament crosstable below:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 Karpov * = 1 = 0 = = 1 1 = = 1 = 1 1 = 1 11.0 2 Salov = * 1 = 1 = = = = = = = 1 = = = 1 10.0 3 Ljubojevic 0 0 * 1 = = 1 = 1 = = 1 1 = = = = 9.5 4 Nunn = = 0 * 1 = = = = 1 = = = = = 1 1 9.5 5 Beliavsky 1 0 = 0 * = = = = 1 = = 1 1 = = 1 9.5 6 Andersson = = = = = * = = = = = = 1 = 1 = = 9.0 7 Portisch = = 0 = = = * = 0 = 1 1 = = = 1 1 9.0 8 Speelman 0 = = = = = = * 1 = = = = = 1 0 1 8.5 9 Sokolov 0 = 0 = = = 1 0 * 0 1 = = = = 1 1 8.0 10 Tal = = = 0 0 = = = 1 * = 0 0 1 = 1 = 7.5 11 Nikolic = = = = = = 0 = 0 = * = = 0 1 = 1 7.5 12 Timman 0 = 0 = = = 0 = = 1 = * = = 0 1 1 7.5 13 Seirawan = 0 0 = 0 0 = = = 1 = = * = 1 = 1 7.5 14 Nogueiras 0 = = = 0 = = = = 0 1 = = * 0 = 1 7.0 15 Korchnoi 0 = = = = 0 = 0 = = 0 1 0 1 * 0 1 6.5 16 Sax = = = 0 = = 0 1 0 0 = 0 = = 1 * 0 6.0 17 Winants 0 0 = 0 0 = 0 0 0 = 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 2.5 Vaganian = = = =

World Cup points were awarded only for results between World Cup players. To understand this, it is helpful to redo the tournament table by including only World Cup players:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts Cup* 1 Karpov * = 1 = = 0 = 1 = 1 = 1 = = 1 1 10.0 27.5 2 Salov = * 1 = = 1 = = = = = = 1 = = = 9.0 25.0 3 Ljubojevic 0 0 * 1 = = 1 = = 1 = 1 1 = = = 9.0 25.0 4 Nunn = = 0 * = 1 = = 1 = = = = 1 = = 8.5 22.0 5 Andersson = = = = * = = = = = = = 1 = = 1 8.5 22.0 6 Beliavsky 1 0 = 0 = * = = 1 = = = 1 = 1 = 8.5 22.0 7 Portisch = = 0 = = = * = = 0 1 1 = 1 = = 8.0 19.5 8 Speelman 0 = = = = = = * = 1 = = = 0 = 1 7.5 18.0 9 Tal = = = 0 = 0 = = * 1 = 0 0 1 1 = 7.0 16.0 10 Sokolov 0 = 0 = = = 1 0 0 * 1 = = 1 = = 7.0 16.0 11 Nikolic = = = = = = 0 = = 0 * = = = 0 1 6.5 13.0 12 Timman 0 = 0 = = = 0 = 1 = = * = 1 = 0 6.5 13.0 13 Seirawan = 0 0 = 0 0 = = 1 = = = * = = 1 6.5 13.0 14 Sax = = = 0 = = 0 1 0 0 = 0 = * = 1 6.0 10.0 15 Nogueiras 0 = = = = 0 = = 0 = 1 = = = * 0 6.0 10.0 16 Korchnoi 0 = = = 0 = = 0 = = 0 1 0 0 1 * 5.5 8.0

*The number at the end of each line is the number of Grand Prix points awarded. There were three sources of these:

(1) The number of points scored against other World Cup players;

(2) Place points, ranging from 17 for first place to 1 for 17th. If players tied for a place, the respective points were divided equally;

(3) If a tournament had fewer than 17 World Cup players, an extra 1/2 point was given for each game less than 16 played.

So Karpov received 10 points for his score, 17 points for finishing sole 1st, and an extra 1/2 point for playing only 15 games, hence a total of 27.5.

Salov and Ljubojevic each received 9 game points, 15.5 place points for splitting second (16 points) and third (15 points), and got their 1/2-point bonus for playing only 15 games, for a total of 25.

Note that Korchnoi, who finished ahead of Sax in the general crosstable, actually wound up with fewer Grand Prix points since he scored fewer points against World Cup players.

The most points a player could win in one tournament was 33, Kasparov coming closest to this by scoring 29 at Belfort.

Source: World Cup chess: the Grandmasters Grand Prix / Lubomir Kavalek. North Pomfret, Vt.: Trafalgar Square Publishing, 1990. 0-943955-31-9.

Original Collection: Game Collection: Brussels World Cup, 1988, by User: Phony Benoni.

 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 140  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Beliavsky vs Korchnoi  ½-½341988Brussels World CupE16 Queen's Indian
2. J Nogueiras vs Sax  ½-½471988Brussels World CupA46 Queen's Pawn Game
3. Tal vs Vaganian  ½-½191988Brussels World CupA30 English, Symmetrical
4. Ulf Andersson vs Winants  ½-½481988Brussels World CupA30 English, Symmetrical
5. A Sokolov vs Ljubojevic 0-1521988Brussels World CupB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
6. Timman vs P Nikolic  ½-½411988Brussels World CupC69 Ruy Lopez, Exchange, Gligoric Variation
7. Nunn vs Speelman  ½-½201988Brussels World CupB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
8. Salov vs Karpov  ½-½301988Brussels World CupE15 Queen's Indian
9. Portisch vs Seirawan  ½-½601988Brussels World CupA25 English
10. Vaganian vs Portisch  ½-½201988Brussels World CupA30 English, Symmetrical
11. Seirawan vs Beliavsky 0-1211988Brussels World CupD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
12. Winants vs Ljubojevic  ½-½211988Brussels World CupD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
13. Speelman vs A Sokolov 1-0671988Brussels World CupE04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
14. Ulf Andersson vs Salov  ½-½611988Brussels World CupE00 Queen's Pawn Game
15. Korchnoi vs Timman 1-0401988Brussels World CupD86 Grunfeld, Exchange
16. Sax vs Tal 0-1421988Brussels World CupB63 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack
17. P Nikolic vs Nunn  ½-½261988Brussels World CupE60 King's Indian Defense
18. Karpov vs J Nogueiras 1-0521988Brussels World CupC18 French, Winawer
19. Salov vs Winants  1-0451988Brussels World CupC64 Ruy Lopez, Classical
20. Timman vs Seirawan  ½-½211988Brussels World CupE41 Nimzo-Indian
21. Ljubojevic vs Speelman  ½-½171988Brussels World CupC07 French, Tarrasch
22. Beliavsky vs Vaganian  ½-½291988Brussels World CupE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
23. J Nogueiras vs Ulf Andersson  ½-½211988Brussels World CupE11 Bogo-Indian Defense
24. Nunn vs Korchnoi ½-½451988Brussels World CupB89 Sicilian
25. A Sokolov vs P Nikolic  1-0581988Brussels World CupC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 140  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <Anatoly Karpov, so the experts said, won the Brussels World Cup (and with it $20,000) in the style of his best years. That is true, but there is more. Seven years ago, when Karpov overwhelmed Korchnoi in their match at Merano, the then cham- pion's style displayed antiseptic elements. Karpov liked to win in a hands-off style, reducing risk to an absolute minimum. This continued to be evident in his first match with Kasparov. At Brussels, howev- er, Karpov seemed more disposed towards the taking of unfathomable risks in order to win games. His marvellous effort against Jan Timman, which I published in this column two weeks ago, is a case in point. >

http://archive.spectator.co.uk/arti...

The prize award should find its way into the intro.

Jun-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Perhaps this photograph w Botvinnik(?) is from the tournament:

http://www.magnumphotos.com/image/P...

Was it held in the Sheraton Hotel?

Jun-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Alien Math: New York Times article http://www.nytimes.com/1988/04/03/n...

seems to indicate event was held at the Brussels Sheraton,

click to expand your image shows,

BELGIUM. Brussels. International chess championship SWIFT at the Sheraton hotel. On the right, Champion Botwinnik. 1988.

Jun-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <Alien Math> yes, the opening ceremony is being described as taking place Thurs 1988.03.31 at the Sheraton.

It does exactly say where the actual games are taking place, which could conceivably be across the street (or elsewhere). Of course it's natural to assume the Sheraton itself the most likely location - but not guaranteed.

The article also goes on to note the first round as taking place on Fri 1988.04.01. Which is significant, since we didn't have the EventDate or R1 date before.

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