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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Karlsbad Tournament

Richard Teichmann18/25(+13 -2 =10)[games]
Akiba Rubinstein17/25(+12 -3 =10)[games]
Carl Schlechter17/25(+13 -4 =8)[games]
Georg Rotlewi16/25(+15 -8 =2)[games]
Frank James Marshall15.5/25(+10 -4 =11)[games]
Aron Nimzowitsch15.5/25(+11 -5 =9)[games]
Milan Vidmar15/25(+10 -5 =10)[games]
Paul Saladin Leonhardt13.5/25(+10 -8 =7)[games]
Savielly Tartakower13.5/25(+9 -7 =9)[games]
Oldrich Duras13.5/25(+10 -8 =7)[games]
Alexander Alekhine13.5/25(+11 -9 =5)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann13/25(+8 -7 =10)[games]
Julius Perlis12/25(+7 -8 =10)[games]
Erich Cohn11.5/25(+8 -10 =7)[games]
Grigory Levenfish11.5/25(+8 -10 =7)[games]
Hugo Suechting11.5/25(+7 -9 =9)[games]
Amos Burn11/25(+8 -11 =6)[games]
Georg Salwe11/25(+6 -9 =10)[games]
Paul F Johner10.5/25(+8 -12 =5)[games]
Abram Isaakovich Rabinovich10.5/25(+5 -9 =11)[games]
Borislav Kostic10.5/25(+5 -9 =11)[games]
Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky10/25(+9 -14 =2)[games]
Semion Alapin8.5/25(+4 -12 =9)[games]
Oscar Chajes8.5/25(+7 -15 =3)[games]
Hans Fahrni8.5/25(+7 -15 =3)[games]
Charles Jaffe8.5/25(+8 -16 =1)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Karlsbad (1911)

The second (1) international chess master tournament (Karlsbad (1907) preceeded it and Karlsbad (1923) was the 3rd in this series) held in the health resort of Karlsbad (located in present day Czech Republic) was conducted from August 20th to September 24th, 1911. The opening ceremony was held in the Kurhaus. Twenty-six chess masters were invited to particpate in the enormous round robin tournament. Among the players were established masters such as Akiba Rubinstein, Carl Schlechter, and Frank James Marshall, as well as younger stars such as Alexander Alekhine, Aron Nimzowitsch, and George Rotlewi. As the tournament went on and the grueling schedule of games took its toll on the players, the expected names emerged as leaders with one noticeable addition: Richard Teichmann! From Teichmann's return to international play in 1902 (after having lost the use of his right eye to an infection) to 1910 he had drawn many games due to poor health, which earned him so many 5th place prizes that he was known as "Richard the Fifth." In 1911, however, Teichmann received a small inheritance from his mother that provided him more leisure time to focus during ongoing tournaments without having to work at the same time. This tournament proved to be Teichmann's greatest international achievement. He earned clear first against the massive field, including victories against shared seconds Rubinstein and Schlechter and fourth place Rotlewi.

The final standings and crosstable:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts 1 Teichmann * 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 18 =2 Rubinstein 0 * ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 17 =2 Schlechter 0 ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 17 4 Rotlewi 0 ½ 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 16 =5 Marshall ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 1 1 15½ =5 Nimzowitsch 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 15½ 7 Vidmar ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ * 0 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 15 =8 Leonhardt ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 13½ =8 Tartakower 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ * 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 13½ =8 Duras 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 13½ =8 Alekhine 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 13½ 12 Spielmann 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 * 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 0 13 13 Perlis ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 * ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 1 12 =14 Cohn ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 11½ =14 Levenfish ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ * 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 1 0 11½ =14 Süchting 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 11½ =17 Burn 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 * 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 0 11 =17 Salwe ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 * 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 11 =19 Johner ½ 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0 10½ =19 Rabinovich ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 10½ =19 Kostic 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 0 1 10½ 22 Dus Chotimirsky 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 ½ * 1 0 0 1 10 =23 Alapin ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ 0 8½ =23 Chajes 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ * 0 1 8½ =23 Fahrni 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 * 0 8½ =23 Jaffe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 * 8½

(1) Wikipedia article: Carlsbad 1911 chess tournament.

Original collection:Game Collection: Karlsbad 1911, by User: suenteus po 147.

 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 325  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Alekhine vs Vidmar 1-0381911KarlsbadC49 Four Knights
2. Spielmann vs Alapin 0-1531911KarlsbadC14 French, Classical
3. Rotlewi vs Rubinstein ½-½431911KarlsbadD33 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
4. A Rabinovich vs E Cohn  0-1501911KarlsbadC36 King's Gambit Accepted, Abbazia Defense
5. J Perlis vs Burn  1-0351911KarlsbadC25 Vienna
6. Levenfish vs Salwe  ½-½521911KarlsbadC88 Ruy Lopez
7. B Kostic vs Marshall  ½-½311911KarlsbadD34 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
8. P F Johner vs Teichmann  ½-½481911KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
9. C Jaffe vs H Suechting 0-1481911KarlsbadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
10. Fahrni vs Nimzowitsch 0-1431911KarlsbadB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
11. Dus Chotimirsky vs Tartakower 1-0461911KarlsbadD08 Queen's Gambit Declined, Albin Counter Gambit
12. Duras vs Leonhardt  1-0701911KarlsbadC77 Ruy Lopez
13. O Chajes vs Schlechter  0-1621911KarlsbadD15 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
14. Schlechter vs J Perlis 1-0451911KarlsbadD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
15. H Suechting vs O Chajes 1-0411911KarlsbadB73 Sicilian, Dragon, Classical
16. Tartakower vs B Kostic 1-0631911KarlsbadA00 Uncommon Opening
17. Teichmann vs Leonhardt  ½-½641911KarlsbadC88 Ruy Lopez
18. Vidmar vs Fahrni  1-0431911KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
19. Salwe vs C Jaffe  ½-½471911KarlsbadD04 Queen's Pawn Game
20. Rubinstein vs Duras 1-0521911KarlsbadA22 English
21. Nimzowitsch vs A Rabinovich 1-0461911KarlsbadC47 Four Knights
22. Marshall vs Alekhine ½-½451911KarlsbadA40 Queen's Pawn Game
23. P F Johner vs Spielmann 0-1281911KarlsbadA84 Dutch
24. E Cohn vs Rotlewi  1-0531911KarlsbadC88 Ruy Lopez
25. Burn vs Dus Chotimirsky  1-0431911KarlsbadC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 325  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <zanzibar> Thanks!

Here's a test, let's see if this takes us to the position before Richard Teichmann's brilliancy-prize-winning sacrifice:

Teichmann vs Schlechter, 1911.

<nok: The old masters were often out of practice indeed as they played much less than modern pros.>

That may be; this tournament must also have been very exhausting. I think the double blunder in Rubinstein-Kostic happened in Round 22, after the tournament had been going on for more or less a month.

Also, some respect for Suechting from Whiteshark:

<whiteshark: <FHBradley: <Why is Süchting called a natural player, by the way?>>

He was a pure amateur with hardly any practice. Ludwig Ernst Bachmann has described him as 'starker Naturschachspieler'

He was born and lived most of his life as a peasant proprietor in a secluded village of a few souls named 'Brackrade' near Eutin in Schleswig-Holstein, North-Germany.

The nearest bigger cities with chess societies, Kiel and Luebeck, were more than 40 resp. 50 km away.

(Could you imagine how a peasant some 110 years ago, after a hard working day on the fields jumped on his horse to ride to the next town, play some hours chess rode back and stand up in the fresh of the next day?)>

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <zanzibar: <offramp> You need to learn how to paste in exact links for a given comment, comme ça - Karlsbad (1911) (kibitz #1)>

Thank you for that. But have you seen Karlsbad (1911) (kibitz #25) ?

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <tamar: <keypusher> It seems like a well-traveled debate. Thanks for the link. While my guess of 2400 is possible based on his score, the examples of his play make me revise downwards to 2300 for Suechting. He was lucky in several games.

He may have been out of practice, as his previous tournament games are two and three years previous.

But his play was awful.>

There seems to me to be an inconsistency here. There is an estimate of his rating based on his score. "2300-2400" based on his minus 2 score.

Then there is a series of qualifications. He was out of practice, he was lucky, and that his play was awful.

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: offramp, the explanation is that I posted before examining the games.
May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: How do you link to a specific post such that the kibitz number appears? It doesn't seem to be on the kibitzing tricks page.
May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Go to search kibitz, right click the post, copy link and then paste.

Karlsbad (1911) (kibitz #48)

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Hugo Suechting (kibitz #12)

Thank you, chancho!

May-11-17  nok: <How do you link to a specific post such that the kibitz number appears?> Well but, what is it good for?
May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: "Link, Huh. Good God. What is good for? Absolutely nothing."

Apologies to Edwin Starr. =))

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <nok: <How do you link to a specific post such that the kibitz number appears?> Well but, what is it good for?>

I think the idea is it works no matter the content of the poster or the reader's ignore list.

May-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <keypusher: <nok: <How do you link to a specific post such that the kibitz number appears?> Well but, what is it good for?>

I think the idea is it works no matter the content of the poster or the reader's ignore list.>

Yes, that's a very important point.

Plus the convenience of jumping directly to the comment in question without having to scroll through the entire page - especially if the given poster has several entries on the same page.

.

May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <zanzibar:...Plus the convenience of jumping directly to the comment in question without having to scroll through the entire page...>

THAT is not quite correct. I have clicked on those links and found that the quoted kibitz is RIGHT at the top of the page. It means that I have to crane my head down, then round and up in order to see under the rim of my monitor.

I therefore suggest subtracting two numbers from your link, so that the kibitz if properly centred on the page. For example:

Hugo Suechting (kibitz #10) instead of

<keypusher: Hugo Suechting (kibitz #12) Thank you, chancho!>

It is a perfect solution.

May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: < offramp: <zanzibar:...Plus the convenience of jumping directly to the comment in question without having to scroll through the entire page...>

THAT is not quite correct. I have clicked on those links and found that the quoted kibitz is RIGHT at the top of the page. It means that I have to crane my head down, then round and up in order to see under the rim of my monitor.>

Funny, you don''t look like a great blue heron in your photo. Have you ever considered learning to use the scrollbar or investing in a pivoting human-type neck?

May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <offramp> is a very capable, and flexible, fellow.
May-13-17  nok: <Plus the convenience of jumping directly to the comment in question without having to scroll through the entire page> So? My method also jumps directly to the comment although the kibitz number doesn't appear.

Karlsbad (1911)

May-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: For being so helpful, <chancho> deserves some BANANA COMPÔTE. Here's how to make it:

Divide the round cakes and when cool turn it into an egg for another half of chopped herbs, a few drops of all on each layer of onion, a lattice-work down and when off, without bringing a basin and a tammy, over the paste, press it with whipped cream.

For more great recipes, turn here:

http://johno.jsmf.net/knowhow/ngram...

May-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <thegoodanarchist: For being so helpful, <chancho> deserves some BANANA COMPÔTE. Here's how to make it:

Divide the round cakes and when cool turn it into an egg for another half of chopped herbs, a few drops of all on each layer of onion, a lattice-work down and when off, without bringing a basin and a tammy, over the paste, press it with whipped cream.

For more great recipes, turn here:

http://johno.jsmf.net/knowhow/ngram...

And for the American version, after sprinkling liberally with beef jerky and chopped spam, marinate for 7 weeks in a nice bucket of Hawaiian Punch and serve on a bed of sloppy joes.

May-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <nok> No, I don't think your method works if we have different ignore lists.

The kpage must match up.

If we did have the same ignore list, then I think it does work, because the kpage would match.

The link in the date tag is easily accessible via right-click mouse-over, and works in all cases.

It's the way to go.

May-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Earlier there was mention of some comments from Nunn comparing players from this tournament. One poster lamented stale links, so I did a quick search, and offer this link as a potential substitute:

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/ch...

Nunn is always worth reading, imo.

.

May-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: And this might have been the original link:

https://web.archive.org/web/2008070...

.

Jul-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <zanzibar: And this might have been the original link: >

Wow, thanks!

<zanzibar: <offramp> is a very capable, and flexible, fellow.>

You too.

Jul-21-17  sudoplatov: Amusingly, Teichmann was ranked fifth in the world in 1911 by Edo.
Jul-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <sudoplatov: Amusingly, Teichmann was ranked fifth in the world in 1911 by Edo.>

Lovely, as well as appropriate, given his tendencies.

Jul-21-17  Howard: Who was Edo?

If you mean Elo, his rating system wasn't exactly around back then.

Or are you referring to Chessmetrics?

Jul-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: There is a site called edochess.com, or some such; another on the lines of Sonas' Chessmetrics.
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