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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Karlsbad Tournament

Alexander Alekhine11.5/17(+9 -3 =5)[games]
Efim Bogoljubov11.5/17(+9 -3 =5)[games]
Geza Maroczy11.5/17(+7 -1 =9)[games]
Richard Reti10.5/17(+7 -3 =7)[games]
Ernst Gruenfeld10.5/17(+6 -2 =9)[games]
Aron Nimzowitsch10/17(+8 -5 =4)[games]
Karel Treybal10/17(+6 -3 =8)[games]
Fred Dewhirst Yates9.5/17(+6 -4 =7)[games]
Richard Teichmann9/17(+3 -2 =12)[games]
Savielly Tartakower8.5/17(+4 -4 =9)[games]
Siegbert Tarrasch8/17(+5 -6 =6)[games]
Akiba Rubinstein7.5/17(+4 -6 =7)[games]
Jacob Bernstein7/17(+5 -8 =4)[games]
Heinrich Wolf6.5/17(+3 -7 =7)[games]
Friedrich Saemisch6/17(+3 -8 =6)[games]
George Alan Thomas5.5/17(+4 -10 =3)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann5/17(+5 -12 =0)[games]
Oscar Chajes5/17(+4 -11 =2)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Karlsbad (1923)

The third master tournament (1) to be held in Karlsbad, Czechoslovakia was held from April 27 to May 22, 1923. Twenty-two masters were invited, the same as in 1911, (2) but only seventeen were able to accept their invitations. Among the players who could not attend for various reasons were Milan Vidmar, David Janowski, and Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky. Friedrich Saemisch was brought in as a reserve to create an even number of players. The eighteen participants played their games in the Helenenhof Imperial Hotel. (3) Among them were an array of European chess masters, including Alexander Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Siegbert Tarrasch, and Akiba Rubinstein. Only the world champion Jose Raul Capablanca, former world champion Emanuel Lasker, and Frank James Marshall were not invited. Although Alekhine had arrived late due to passport trouble, he dominated for much of the tournament until the penultimate round, where his loss to Rudolf Spielmann allowed Geza Maroczy to catch up. Bogoljubov also managed to close the gap, tying with them due to his final round win against Karel Treybal. The three winners earned 3,505 Czech Crowns for their victory, with Alekhine earning an additional "Prize of Honor," a crystal goblet worth 1,000 Crowns, and Bogoljubov receiving a cash prize worth half Alekhine's prize. The tournament also saw the distribution of ten brilliancy prizes, including three "first prizes" which went to Alekhine for his win against Ernst Gruenfeld, Aron Nimzowitsch for his win against Fred Dewhirst Yates, and Yates for his win against Alekhine.

The final standings and crosstable:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts =1 Alekhine * 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 0 1 11˝ =1 Bogoljubov 0 * ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 0 ˝ 1 1 1 1 11˝ =1 Maróczy 0 ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 11˝ =4 Réti ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 0 ˝ 1 0 0 10˝ =4 Grünfeld 0 ˝ 0 ˝ * 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 10˝ =6 Nimzowitsch ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 * 0 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 10 =6 Treybal 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 * 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 10 8 Yates 1 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 9˝ 9 Teichmann ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 9 10 Tartakower ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 8˝ 11 Tarrasch 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ * 0 1 1 ˝ 1 0 1 8 12 Rubinstein 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 * 0 0 1 1 1 ˝ 7˝ 13 Bernstein 0 1 ˝ 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ 0 1 0 1 7 14 Wolf 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 ˝ * 0 ˝ 1 0 6˝ 15 Sämisch ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 6 16 Thomas 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 * 1 1 5˝ =17 Spielmann 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 5 =17 Chajes 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 1 0 0 1 * 5

(1) Wikipedia article: Carlsbad 1923 chess tournament. (2) Karlsbad (1911). (3) http://www.spa-hotel-imperial.cz/en....

Original collection: Game Collection: Karlsbad 1923, by User: suenteus po 147. The depth and accuracy is due in large part to the efforts of <Benzol>, who has our eternal gratitude.

 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. J Bernstein vs Spielmann 0-1291923KarlsbadD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Yates vs G A Thomas  ½-½461923KarlsbadC88 Ruy Lopez
3. Teichmann vs Maroczy  ½-½231923KarlsbadC13 French
4. Tartakower vs K Treybal  ½-½361923KarlsbadC44 King's Pawn Game
5. Saemisch vs Gruenfeld  ½-½301923KarlsbadD79 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O, Main line
6. Nimzowitsch vs H Wolf 1-0551923KarlsbadA06 Reti Opening
7. O Chajes vs Reti 1-0621923KarlsbadB18 Caro-Kann, Classical
8. Bogoljubov vs Tarrasch 1-0281923KarlsbadE60 King's Indian Defense
9. Gruenfeld vs Alekhine 0-1341923KarlsbadD64 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
10. Yates vs Nimzowitsch 0-1451923KarlsbadA07 King's Indian Attack
11. H Wolf vs Teichmann  ½-½391923KarlsbadC49 Four Knights
12. K Treybal vs Saemisch  ½-½651923KarlsbadB40 Sicilian
13. G A Thomas vs Spielmann 1-0511923KarlsbadC77 Ruy Lopez
14. Tarrasch vs Tartakower ½-½811923KarlsbadB10 Caro-Kann
15. Rubinstein vs O Chajes ½-½681923KarlsbadA46 Queen's Pawn Game
16. Reti vs J Bernstein 1-0441923KarlsbadA04 Reti Opening
17. Maroczy vs Bogoljubov ½-½451923KarlsbadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
18. Alekhine vs Rubinstein 1-0321923KarlsbadD64 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
19. Alekhine vs K Treybal 0-1441923KarlsbadD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
20. Teichmann vs Yates  ½-½491923KarlsbadD64 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
21. Tartakower vs Maroczy  ½-½261923KarlsbadC00 French Defense
22. Spielmann vs Reti 1-0331923KarlsbadB40 Sicilian
23. Saemisch vs Tarrasch  ½-½491923KarlsbadD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
24. Nimzowitsch vs G A Thomas 0-1651923KarlsbadE77 King's Indian
25. Bogoljubov vs H Wolf ½-½531923KarlsbadD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-08-13  Karpova: Viktor Tietz explains the distribution of prizes according to the <System Tietz> on p. 158 of the July 1923 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'. Tietz, the tournament director, was opposed to the Sonneborn-Berger system.

As Maroczy, Alekhine and Bogoljubov all had 11.5 points, they all got 3,605 czech crowns each. Yet, only the one with most wins was entitled to receive the special prize of 1,000 czech crowns - in this case Alekhine and Bogoljubov (9 wins each), but not Maroczy (7 wins).

Accordingly, both Reti and Grünfeld received the same prize. Same goes for Nimzowitsch and Treybal.

Sep-12-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Alekhine scored very well against the 4 players who finished below him.
Sep-12-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: For all that, his loss in Alekhine vs Spielmann, 1923 in the penultimate round to one of the bottom markers very nearly put paid to his chances of first prize.

Had never read the kibitzes to the above and was interested to learn how Alekhine expressed his displeasure over the result--not that I blame him, as he was leading outright entering the game with Spielmann.

Jun-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <Karpova: Viktor Tietz explains the distribution of prizes according to the <System Tietz> ...>

Okay, but does this mean that Alekhine was the official winner of the tournament, or was this system only meant to be used to distribute money, with the tournament officially remaining a three-way tie?

Jun-17-15  Karpova: <Fusilli>

Tietz makes clear, that Bogoljubov, Alekhine and Maroczy got and had to get the same prize, i. e. the prize for first place. They were joint winners with 11.5 points each. Tietz didn't make use of a system like Sonneborn-Berger.

I didn't find the exact prize money, but I guess that the prizes for first, second and third place were added up and then divided by three, to arrive at 3,605 Czech crowns for each player.

It's just that there were special prizes, and only Bogoljubov and Alekhine got the one of 1,000 Czech crowns, due to their higher number of wins.

Feb-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: "Ten brilliancy prizes were awarded at the conclusion of the international tournament at Carlsbad, as follows: Four hundred crowns each to Alekhine, Niemzowitsch and Yates for their games against Gruenfeld, Yates and Alekhine; 200 crowns each to Niemzowitsch, Spielmann and Niemzowitsch for their games against Bernstein, Saemisch and Spielmann; 100 crowns each to Alekhine, Bogoljubow, Maroczy and Chajes for their games against Rubinstein, Spielmann, Chajes and Spielmann," - <American Chess Bulletin>, July-August, 1923, ph. 117.
Oct-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: < Only the world champion Jose Raul Capablanca, former world champion Emanuel Lasker, and Frank James Marshall were not invited.>

According to <BDE>, January 4th, 1923, p.27, Marshall was one of three original American invites (with Chajes and Janowski). Marshall's participation is reported as doubtful on the basis of his prospective match with Edward Lasker, set for March (Marshall - Ed Lasker US Championship (1923)).

<It would be interesting to discover the circumstances behind Bernstein's invitation to compete in the 1923 Carlsbad tournament. He seems at the most a minor master who would not be considered one of the top players in the world.> (Jacob Bernstein)

The same article reveals that Bernstein wasn't invited; he applied for the job! Presumably, when his friend Chajes was invited, he fancied some of that: <The communication came from Victor Tietz, chairman of the congress committee, who was mainly instrumental in bringing about the Carlsbad congresses of 1907 and 1911.

[...] However, whether Marshall goes or not, Mr. Tietz assured Bernstein that a place for him would be kept open. Bernstein expects to sail for Europe early in April, probably in company with Chajes.>

Oct-26-16  JimNorCal: To give him his due, Bernstein did finish above Chajes.
Oct-26-16  JimNorCal: Bernstein's result (+5,-8) is a mirror of Nimzo's (+8,-5). Nimzo appears to have been in a truculent mood. He had the most wins outside the co-winners but also the most losses of anyone in the top half of the table.
Oct-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: On the topic of truculence: Spielmann had no draws at all, a result which might quieten those who decry the typical top-level event nowadays with no outsiders, so is bound to produce a fair number of drawn games.
Oct-27-16  JimNorCal: Sorry, perf, I am not following.
How does the no-draw result of one player in a 1923 event "quieten" people regarding top level events nowadays?
Jan-29-17  Paarhufer: From the introduction: <The three winners earned 3,505 Czech Crowns for their victory>. Well, they got 3605. The next two got 2730, then 2290, 1855, 1415, 980, 920, 865, 805, 750, 690, 635 and 575 crowns.

<with Alekhine earning an additional "Prize of Honor," a crystal goblet worth 1,000 Crowns, and Bogoljubov receiving a cash prize worth half Alekhine's prize.> Alekhine and Bogoljubov won the goblet together, and Alekhine payed Bogoljubov 500 Crowns.

<The tournament also saw the distribution of ten brilliancy prizes> The tournament book mentions also 14 special prizes ("Sonderpreise"). These were given for the most wins, the best result against the prize winners (places 1-9), for the best results in the final 5 rounds, and to Spielmann for having no draws.

Apr-03-17  Marcelo Bruno: Even at his last international tournament Teichmann had only 2 losses besides 3 wins and 12 draws: he was indeed not easy to beat!
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