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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Moscow Tournament

Efim Bogoljubov15.5/20(+13 -2 =5)[games]
Emanuel Lasker14/20(+10 -2 =8)[games]
Jose Raul Capablanca13.5/20(+9 -2 =9)[games]
Frank James Marshall12.5/20(+10 -5 =5)[games]
Savielly Tartakower12/20(+6 -2 =12)[games]
Carlos Torre Repetto12/20(+8 -4 =8)[games]
Richard Reti11.5/20(+7 -4 =9)[games]
Peter Arsenievich Romanovsky11.5/20(+9 -6 =5)[games]
Ernst Gruenfeld10.5/20(+4 -3 =13)[games]
Alexander Ilyin-Zhenevsky10.5/20(+7 -6 =7)[games]
Fedor Parfenovich Bohatirchuk10/20(+4 -4 =12)[games]
Boris Verlinsky9.5/20(+7 -8 =5)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann9.5/20(+6 -7 =7)[games]
Akiba Rubinstein9.5/20(+7 -8 =5)[games]
Grigory Levenfish9/20(+5 -7 =8)[games]
Ilya Leontievich Rabinovich8.5/20(+5 -8 =7)[games]
Fred Dewhurst Yates7/20(+5 -11 =4)[games]
Friedrich Saemisch6.5/20(+2 -9 =9)[games]
Solomon Borisovich Gotthilf6.5/20(+1 -8 =11)[games]
Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky6/20(+4 -12 =4)[games]
Nikolay Zubarev4.5/20(+2 -13 =5)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Moscow (1925)

At the end of the USSR Championship (1925), Efim Bogoljubov emerged as the champion. He had participated as a Russian national although he was living in Triberg, Germany at the time. Nikolai Vasilyevich Krylenko, head of the Soviet Chess Association, in an effort to popularize chess in the Soviet Union, organized an international tournament of the scope seen in New York (1924) a year earlier. (1) The event was held in the Metropol Hotel in Moscow (2) from November 7 to December 10. In addition to the Soviet Champion, ten foreign masters, including Emanuel Lasker and Jose Raul Capablanca, the former and current World Champions respectively, and ten Soviet players were invited to compete in the round robin format. Before the start of the tournament pundits expected a repeat of New York, with Capablanca and Lasker racing each other to the finish, but once it was under way Bogoljubov was the one who performed supremely, ultimately winning the tournament ahead of the two favorites. His victory was hailed as a Soviet triumph, and in truth the tournament was an unprecedented success for the Revolution. Hundreds of Soviet citizens gathered at the hotel to follow the games, and tens of thousands across the country awaited news from Moscow each day. The celebration would be a bittersweet one for Soviet Russia, however, as Bogoljubov would never participate in another Soviet event. He defected a year later and eventually became a German citizen, earning him the moniker "renegade" (as Alekhine had). It was also a tournament that would be of enormous historical importance.

Footage of the tournament appeared in the silent film Chess Fever (Shakhmatnaya Goryachka) and footage of Capablanca was shot in Moscow for the film.

Moscow, Soviet Union (Russia), 10 November - 9 December 1925

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 Pts 1 Bogoljubov * ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 15½ 2 Lasker ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 14 3 Capablanca 1 ½ * 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 13½ 4 Marshall ½ 0 0 * ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 12½ =5 Tartakower 0 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 12 =5 Torre 0 1 ½ 1 ½ * ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 12 =7 Reti 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ * 1 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 11½ =7 Romanovsky ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 * 1 0 ½ 1 0 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 11½ =9 Grünfeld 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 * 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 10½ =9 Ilyn-Zhenevsky 0 0 1 1 ½ ½ 0 1 0 * ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 10½ 11 Bohatirchuk ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 10 =12 Verlinsky 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ * 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 9½ =12 Spielmann 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 9½ =12 Rubinstein ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 0 0 0 * 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 9½ 15 Levenfish 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 9 16 Rabinovich 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 * 1 ½ 1 1 1 8½ 17 Yates 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 0 * 1 ½ 0 1 7 =18 Sämisch 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 * 0 1 0 6½ =18 Gotthilf 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 * 0 ½ 6½ 20 Dus Chotimirsky 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 * 1 6 21 Zubarev 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 * 4½

(1) Wikipedia article: Moscow 1925 chess tournament. (2) Wikipedia article: Hotel Metropol (Moscow).

Original collection: Game Collection: Moscow 1925, by User: suenteus po 147. Chess Fever on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TN6...

 page 1 of 9; games 1-25 of 210  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Marshall vs B Verlinsky 1-0291925MoscowB20 Sicilian
2. Dus Chotimirsky vs Reti  ½-½371925MoscowA47 Queen's Indian
3. Spielmann vs I Rabinovich ½-½741925MoscowC28 Vienna Game
4. N Zubarev vs Rubinstein 0-1411925MoscowA34 English, Symmetrical
5. S Gotthilf vs P Romanovsky  0-1411925MoscowA84 Dutch
6. Capablanca vs Lasker ½-½291925MoscowD47 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
7. Tartakower vs Ilyin-Zhenevsky  ½-½401925MoscowA28 English
8. Bogoljubov vs Gruenfeld 1-0291925MoscowC49 Four Knights
9. Levenfish vs F Bohatirchuk  ½-½371925MoscowD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
10. Saemisch vs Yates 0-1461925MoscowE61 King's Indian
11. P Romanovsky vs Capablanca  ½-½161925MoscowC47 Four Knights
12. B Verlinsky vs Levenfish  1-0311925MoscowD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. F Bohatirchuk vs Tartakower  ½-½621925MoscowB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
14. Carlos Torre vs Dus Chotimirsky 1-0551925MoscowA46 Queen's Pawn Game
15. Reti vs Marshall 0-1301925MoscowA13 English
16. Gruenfeld vs S Gotthilf ½-½901925MoscowD12 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
17. Ilyin-Zhenevsky vs Spielmann 1-0541925MoscowC14 French, Classical
18. Rubinstein vs Saemisch 1-0311925MoscowE46 Nimzo-Indian
19. Yates vs Bogoljubov 0-1401925MoscowB80 Sicilian, Scheveningen
20. I Rabinovich vs N Zubarev 1-0311925MoscowE22 Nimzo-Indian, Spielmann Variation
21. Tartakower vs B Verlinsky 1-0361925MoscowD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
22. Spielmann vs F Bohatirchuk  ½-½211925MoscowC26 Vienna
23. S Gotthilf vs Yates  ½-½351925MoscowE60 King's Indian Defense
24. Levenfish vs Reti ½-½511925MoscowB03 Alekhine's Defense
25. Capablanca vs Gruenfeld ½-½221925MoscowD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
 page 1 of 9; games 1-25 of 210  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: All this hoo-ha about Bogoljubov not being a worthy challenger to Alekhine in 1929 is just a load of hoo-ha.

At chessmetrics (http://chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/Play... ) Jeff Sonas has written thus:

<Best Individual Performance: 2762 in Moscow, 1925, scoring 10/14 (71%) vs 2647-rated opposition> That's this tournament, of course.

... Above that Sonas wrote, for Efim,

<Best World Rank: #1 (2 different months between the January 1927 rating list and the February 1927 rating list )>

Wherefore? Well, EDB had won the USSR Ch in both 1924 and 1925. Then he won here and then, says wikipedia,

<In 1926, he emigrated to Germany. He won, ahead of Akiba Rubinstein that year at Berlin. [He was not too bad at] Kissingen 1928, where he triumphed (+6 -1 =4) over a field which included Capablanca, Nimzowitsch and Savielly Tartakower. Bogoljubov won two matches against Max Euwe (both 5.5–4.5) in 1928 and 1928/29 in the Netherlands.>

But this tournament in Moscow was his outstanding achievement. Finishing ahead of Lasker was a feat accomplished by only a handful of players before Lasker's first retirement.

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Bogoljubov-Capablanca game from this tournament was a classic fighting game
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: A crucial score from this event is that of Fedor Parfenovich Bohatirchuk. He scored 50%. If we can figure out HIS rating, then we know the average rating of the tournament and from that we'll know the rating of everyone in the entire world!!
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karne: At this time, Moscow was in turbulence. Capablanca considered resigning at the very start, but Boguljobov's disorganized belly endowed him with enough confidence to get on.
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <All this hoo-ha about Bogoljubov not being a worthy challenger to Alekhine in 1929 is just a load of hoo-ha.>

That was mainly a commentary on the 2nd match (1934). Even Alekhine agreed with that <This game - more than any other - proves how useless from the sporting point of view was the arrangement of this second match, and at the same time explains my indifferent play on a number of occasions>.

Of course Alekhine could have played Nimzovitsch, Botvinnik, Reshevsky, or a rematch with Capablanca instead.

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Marmot PFL: <All this hoo-ha about Bogoljubov not being a worthy challenger to Alekhine in 1929 is just a load of hoo-ha.> That was mainly a commentary on the 2nd match (1934). Even Alekhine agreed with that <This game - more than any other - proves how useless from the sporting point of view was the arrangement of this second match, and at the same time explains my indifferent play on a number of occasions>.

Of course Alekhine could have played Nimzovitsch, Botvinnik, Reshevsky, or a rematch with Capablanca instead.>

1934 was too late for Nimzowitsch, and too early for Botvinnik and Reshevsky. Capablanca was inactive in the early 30s. Flohr would probably have been the least bad.

Sort of like the situation with Kasparov in the 1990s, or arguably Carlsen now. No one was qualified, really.

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Capa, Flohr and Nimzo were all better than Bogo, at this point in time.
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <HeMateMe: Capa, Flohr and Nimzo were all better than Bogo, at this point in time.>

If by <at this point in time> you mean 1934, you're quite wrong about Nimzowitsch, who was dropping like a stone and died a year later. Capa's low ranking on the April 1934 chessmetrics list (when the match began) is the result of inactivity, but it's hard to rate someone who isn't playing. Kashdan, Flohr, and Euwe were all rated (slightly) higher than Bogoljubov. Of course, Euwe got his shot a year later.

http://chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/Sing...

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Flohr and Capa were two of the best players of the 30s. I can't believe they were not more deserving than Bogo II.
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  WCC Editing Project:

I have compiled a comparative presentation of results among <POTENTIAL OPPONENTS> for Alexander Alekhine between

Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Match (1929) (6 Sept - 12 Nov 1929)

and

Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934) (1 April - 14 June 1934)

The potential opponents are limited here to <Capablanca, Nimzowitsch, Kashdan, Flohr, Euwe, Bogoljubov>.

The list is here- you can examine many of the events and play through many of the head to head encounters as well:

Game Collection: WCC: Alekhine-Bogoljubov 1934 ARCHIVE Contenders

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  WCC Editing Project:

<HeMateMe> I have to agree with <keypusher's> post, but I'm sure everyone (where have you gone, man?) would have preferred to see an <Alekhine-Capablanca> rematch.

As <keypusher> notes, though, <Capablanca's> extended absence from competitive play makes him tough to handicap from a "results" perspective.

He barely had any results during this period to analyze.

Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Golombek conjectured on Capa's long absence from tournament play following New York 1931 in his collection, but has it ever been made clear why he stayed out of action?
Mar-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <Capa, Flohr and Nimzo were all better than Bogo, at this point in time.>

Also Botvinnik at Nottingham beat Bogo in 25 moves (with black).

However Botvinnik would probably not have challenged Alekhine until he thought he could be reasonably sure of winning (1938 or later). He might have beaten Euwe, but Euwe was committted to a rematch with Alekhine.

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I once suggested (at Alexander Alekhine (kibitz #2965)) that Alekhine burned out quite quickly after 1935. But I was wrong! He had, like many great players (Karpov for example) a very powerful second wind and was playing strongly throughout the Nazi era.

As regards an Alekhine-Capablanca Match, I gave my thoughts at Jose Raul Capablanca (kibitz #1748). The gist of it is

<A rematch would have been under identical rules - ie the first to 6 wins. In 1930, in a post-Wall St-Crash world, which mental midget entrepreneur was going to write a blank check for a match between a stronger Alekhine and a better-prepared Capablanca?? A match of - what? - 40 games? 50 games??>

But this isn't really the place to talk about that rematch. This should be a joyous occasion!

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <WCC Editing Project>

Game Collection: WCC: Alekhine-Bogoljubov 1934 ARCHIVE Contenders

Thanks, very interesting.

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <I once suggested (at Alexander Alekhine (kibitz #2965)) that Alekhine burned out quite quickly after 1935. But I was wrong! He had, like many great players (Karpov for example) a very powerful second wind and was playing strongly throughout the Nazi era.>

Alekhine's level from the mid-20s to the early 30s was extraordinarily high so some decline was inevitable. Working capacity is limited and there were younger rivals coming along who grew up studying Alekhine as he had studied Lasker, Capa and Rubinstein.

Up until 1943 Alekhine still played very well, although the competition during the war years was not so strong. After that he moved to Portugal, had financial and political problems, began to smoke and drink more heavily and went downhill.

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Was this the tournament during which Capablanca undertook a big journey to play a simultaneous display against some very strong players, lost quite a few and struggled for the rest of the tournament?
Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <offramp: Was this the tournament during which Capablanca undertook a big journey to play a simultaneous display against some very strong players,>

Yes

<lost quite a few >

Depends on how you define a few

<and struggled for the rest of the tournament?>

No.

The simul was in Leningrad on November 20th, an off-day.

Capablanca vs Botvinnik, 1925

Going into the simul, as we can see Capa had scored an anemic +2-1=5. (He had started badly at New York the year before also.)

He lost the first game after the simul, in dreadful fashion (Capablanca vs Verlinsky, 1925) but overall scored +7-1=4 after coming back.

He lost four out of 30 games at the simul, which is a lot for him but not bad given how strong his opponents were.

He also played several simuls in Moscow while the tournament was in progress, according to <paladin at large>.

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  WCC Editing Project:

Thanks <Scott>, means a lot to me coming from you.

Apr-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  WCC Editing Project:

<Capablanca> on his experience at <Moscow 1925>:

<"Although very philosophical, very observant and completely dispassionate in my judgment about everything concerning chess and its great exponents, I was nonetheless <<<unable to understand>>> the curious phenomenon that was occurring. I could comprehend perfectly well that my own work was not at all effective, but I could not see anything outstanding in that of the other players.">

-Edward Winter, "Capablanca" p.128

Apr-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: After looking at Capablanca's games from this tournament, Alekhine must have realised that he had a serious chance of winning a match with Capablanca. Even the win v Bogoljubov is unconvincing.
Apr-02-15  Howard: Granted, New York 1924 and Moscow 1925 were not exactly two of Capablanca's better tournaments....

...but then what about New York 1927. Alekhine's confidence was probably a bit shaken by Capa's performance in that one !

Apr-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: But Alekhine must have been delighted to see Capablanca as lost as the Holy Grail after only <14 moves> in his game against Verlinsky.
Mar-01-16  The Kings Domain: This was the tournament that probably foreshadowed the Soviet dominance of the game to come.

The film "Chess Fever" that featured the tournament is a delightful little charmer. :-)

Mar-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <.......what about New York 1927. Alekhine's confidence was probably a bit shaken by Capa's performance in that one>

That event may well have redoubled Alekhine's bottomless well of determination and served as a reminder that, only through unstinting effort, could he overcome Capablanca.

Capa's fine result at New York may, conversely, have made him overconfident in anticipation of Buenos Aires.

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