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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Palma de Mallorca Interzonal Tournament

Robert James Fischer18.5/23(+15 -1 =7)[games]
Bent Larsen15/23(+9 -2 =12)[games]
Efim Geller15/23(+8 -1 =14)[games]
Robert Huebner15/23(+10 -3 =10)[games]
Mark Taimanov14/23(+8 -3 =12)[games]
Wolfgang Uhlmann14/23(+10 -5 =8)[games]
Lajos Portisch13.5/23(+7 -3 =13)[games]
Vasily Smyslov13.5/23(+7 -3 =13)[games]
Lev Polugaevsky13/23(+5 -2 =16)[games]
Svetozar Gligoric13/23(+7 -4 =12)[games]
Oscar Panno12.5/23(+6 -4 =13)[games]
Henrique Mecking12.5/23(+7 -5 =11)[games]
Vlastimil Hort11.5/23(+5 -5 =13)[games]
Borislav Ivkov10.5/23(+2 -4 =17)[games]
Duncan Suttles10/23(+4 -7 =12)[games]
Dragoljub Minic10/23(+5 -8 =10)[games]
Samuel Reshevsky9.5/23(+3 -7 =13)[games]
Milan Matulovic9/23(+2 -7 =14)[games]
William G Addison9/23(+3 -8 =12)[games]
Miroslav Filip8.5/23(+1 -7 =15)[games]
Renato Naranja8.5/23(+5 -11 =7)[games]
Tudev Ujtumen8.5/23(+5 -11 =7)[games]
Jorge Alberto Rubinetti6/23(+2 -13 =8)[games]
Eleazar Jimenez Zerquera5.5/23(+2 -14 =7)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970)

The 1970 Interzonal was held in Palma de Mallorca from November 9-December 12, and was the last Interzonal held as a one-section round robin. With the tournament swelling to 24 players and further expansion on the way, future changes were inevitable. The following players vied for six slots in the candidates matches to be held in 1971: William G Addison, Miroslav Filip, Robert James Fischer, Efim Geller, Svetozar Gligoric, Vlastimil Hort, Robert Huebner, Borislav Ivkov, Eleazar Jimenez Zerquera, Bent Larsen, Milan Matulovic, Henrique Mecking, Dragoljub Minic, Renato Naranja, Oscar Panno, Lev Polugaevsky, Lajos Portisch, Samuel Reshevsky, Jorge Alberto Rubinetti, Vasily Smyslov, Duncan Suttles, Mark Taimanov, Wolfgang Uhlmann, Tudev Ujtumen.

Ujtumen from Mongolia, about as outside as an outsider could get, actually held the lead by himself after round 3. However, reality and Robert J. Fischer set in, as the American quickly soared to a dominating position. The other contenders didn't worry about it too much; after all, you only had to finish in the top six to qualify for the Candidates, and there was even a seventh spot open for a reserve. So they played it safe, while Fischer kept working hard.

At the quarter pole following round 6, Fischer had 5.5 points and a 1.5 point lead on Geller, Gligoric, Larson, Panno, and Ujtumen. But then came a bad stretch: he managed to draw lost positions in round 7 and 8, but Larsen didn't let him off the hook in round 9. By now the lead had vanished, as Geller joined Fischer at the top with 6.5.

That led to the critical round 12 encounter between the leaders, Geller holding a half-point lead and playing the White pieces. Any normal grandmaster, when Geller offered an early draw, would have accepted to get an easy half-point closer to qualification. Fischer, hungry for a win after five rounds without one, refused.

Geller played inaccurately and lost a pawn, reaching a difficult rook ending. Eventually, a hallucination and a final mistake sealed his fate, and Fischer took the lead. The rest was a matter of technique: Fischer won two more in a row, took a couple of draws for a breather, then started his famous streak with full points in his last seven games.

There was plenty of action for the other qualifying spots, though. When Fischer began his streak in round 17, he had 11.5 points to Geller's 11.0 while Uhlmann had 10.5, and Taimanov 10.0. Trailing were Gligoric, Hübner, Larsen, and Polugaevsky with 9.5, plus Mecking and Panno with 9.0.

Geller played solidly the rest of the way, making sure of qualifying without trouble. Uhlmann and Taimanov both faded a bit (and played Fischer along the way), while Larsen and Hübner went on winning streaks and Smyslov came out of nowhere back into contention. Going into what became a controversial last round, these were the standings:

17.5: Fischer

15.0: Hübner

14.5: Geller

14.0: Larsen

13.0: Taimanov, Uhlmann

12.5: Gligoric, Panno, Polugaevsky, Portisch, Smyslov

12.0: Mecking

Remember, the top six qualify for the Candidates, with a seventh spot available for a reserve (and with the unpredictable Fischer in the mix, that could well become valuable). Fischer, Hübner, Geller and Larsen were sure qualifiers. Taimanov and Uhlmann could be sure of qualifying with a win, but should either fail any of the 12.5s could find leap ahead and even Mecking had a theoretical chance.

Uhlmann had white against an outsider in Naranja, and got his point without too much trouble. Taimanov had the theoretically tougher game, but won relatively easily; the kibitzing for Taimanov vs Matulovic, 1970 discusses the rumors that Matulovic's pocketbook was on steroids. That still left the reserve spot, with Portisch and Smyslov winning their games while Gligoric and Polugaevsky drew and Panno was scheduled to play Black against Fischer.

Panno, however, refused to play. The games of the last round were scheduled for 4:00 PM Saturday, but Fischer and Reshevsky were allowed to start at 7:00 PM for religious reasons. Panno felt this was particularly unfair in the last round, because some players might have an advantage from knowing the results of earlier games.

This was a particularly selfless protest, since Panno himself was the only player who could have benefitted from that information. However, he stuck to his guns even after Fischer urged him to play, and did no more than actually come to the board and resign in person rather than forfeit. For more discussion, see the kibitzing to Fischer vs Panno, 1970.

The only unfinished business was a playoff match betweeen Portisch and Smyslov for the reserve spot, played in Portoroz in 1971. This was drawn, and Portisch was awarded the consolation prize due to better tiebreaks from the tournament.

Auditorium de Palma de Mallorca, Spain, 9 November - 12 December 1970

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 1 Fischer * 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 18.5 2 Larsen 1 * ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 15.0 3 Geller 0 ½ * 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 15.0 4 Hübner ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 15.0 5 Taimanov 0 1 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 14.0 6 Uhlmann 0 0 0 0 ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 14.0 7 Portisch ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 13.5 8 Smyslov 0 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 13.5 9 Polugaevsky ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 13.0 10 Gligoric 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 13.0 11 Panno 0 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 12.5 12 Mecking 0 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 12.5 13 Hort 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 * 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 11.5 14 Ivkov 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 10.5 15 Suttles 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ * 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 10.0 16 Minic 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 * 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 10.0 17 Reshevsky 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 9.5 18 Matulovic ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 9.0 19 Addison 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 0 1 1 9.0 20 Filip 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 8.5 21 Naranja ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 1 1 1 ½ * 0 0 1 8.5 22 Ujtumen ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 * 1 ½ 8.5 23 Rubinetti 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 0 * 1 6.0 24 Jimenez ½ ½ ½ 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 * 5.5

Chief arbiter: Alberic O'Kelly de Galway. William G. Addison authored a note to FIDE about the way O'Kelly had managed the tournament, asking why he was always selected as arbiter of main FIDE events. More than half the players signed the note. (1) At the banquet, Fischer was awarded the Chess Oscar, and the draw was held for the quarterfinal pairings:

Larsen - Uhlmann Candidates Quarterfinal (1971)
Petrosian - Hübner Candidates Quarterfinal (1971)
Korchnoi - Geller Candidates Quarterfinal (1971)
Fischer - Taimanov Candidates Quarterfinal (1971)

In case of withdrawals (which did not happen), the 7th place (and first reserve spot) between Portisch and Smyslov was decided at the Portoroz Candidates Reserve Playoff (1971).

1) Tidskrift för Schack, January 1971, p. 13.

The Sousse Interzonal (1967) was the previous and the Petropolis Interzonal (1973) and Leningrad Interzonal (1973) were the next interzonals in the FIDE qualifier cycles.

Original collection: Game Collection: Interzonal 1970 (Palma de Mallorca), by User: Phony Benoni.

 page 1 of 12; games 1-25 of 276  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Geller vs E Jimenez Zerquera  ½-½281970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
2. Uhlmann vs Gligoric  1-0671970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE75 King's Indian, Averbakh, Main line
3. E Jimenez Zerquera vs Matulovic  0-1631970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalB08 Pirc, Classical
4. Polugaevsky vs Mecking  ½-½521970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalA17 English
5. J A Rubinetti vs Panno  ½-½661970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE92 King's Indian
6. Suttles vs Smyslov ½-½411970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalC26 Vienna
7. Ujtumen vs Reshevsky 1-0431970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalB48 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
8. Minic vs R Naranja  1-0341970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalC07 French, Tarrasch
9. Ivkov vs Larsen  ½-½121970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE16 Queen's Indian
10. Taimanov vs W G Addison  ½-½291970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalD16 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
11. Fischer vs Huebner ½-½441970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalB10 Caro-Kann
12. Filip vs Hort  ½-½181970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE60 King's Indian Defense
13. Geller vs Portisch  ½-½211970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalC95 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Breyer
14. Reshevsky vs J A Rubinetti  ½-½411970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE46 Nimzo-Indian
15. Mecking vs Hort 1-0391970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalD83 Grunfeld, Grunfeld Gambit
16. Smyslov vs Fischer 0-1441970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalA36 English
17. W G Addison vs Suttles 0-1411970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalB06 Robatsch
18. Portisch vs Ivkov  ½-½181970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalA21 English
19. Gligoric vs Taimanov  ½-½161970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalD16 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
20. Polugaevsky vs Geller  ½-½121970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
21. Huebner vs Filip  ½-½141970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalA07 King's Indian Attack
22. R Naranja vs E Jimenez Zerquera  1-0371970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE91 King's Indian
23. Larsen vs Minic 1-0391970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalA01 Nimzovich-Larsen Attack
24. Matulovic vs Ujtumen 0-1771970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalC81 Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack
25. Panno vs Uhlmann  ½-½411970Palma de Mallorca InterzonalE80 King's Indian, Samisch Variation
 page 1 of 12; games 1-25 of 276  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-03-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <keypusher:

But this isn't fair to Botvinnik, since he played until he was 59, and Fischer retired at the age of 29>

It's probably also not fair for Fischer.
We miss all the games he would have had in his prime.

Jan-03-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <offramp: It's amazing that Fischer could have a bad patch, rounds 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 where he only scored 2/5, and yet still win by such a huge margin.>

Known as, "non-Giri" mode.

Jan-03-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: It's funny, I really didn't remember the earlier conversation. Anyway, thanks for the interesting discussion. I think I'll actually play over some of Botvinnik's games - I'm getting older, and think that his style, or similar, might be more of a match for me than some crazy Poisoned Pawn Sicilian or such.
Jan-03-17  todicav23: < diceman: <keypusher:

But this isn't fair to Botvinnik, since he played until he was 59, and Fischer retired at the age of 29>

It's probably also not fair for Fischer.
We miss all the games he would have had in his prime.>

Of course it is not fair. Botvinnik was 37 in 1948. Fischer retired at 29, probably before he reached his peak. Fischer also played very strong players when he was very young. He was a WC candidate at 16.

According to this database, the overall record is:

Fischer: +420 -86 =246 (72.2%)
Botvinnik: +568 -138 =463 (68.4%)

Fischer at his best (1968-1972) scored ~80% in world class tournaments and matches over more than 100 games.

Jan-03-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <RookFile: It's funny, I really didn't remember the earlier conversation. Anyway, thanks for the interesting discussion. I think I'll actually play over some of Botvinnik's games - I'm getting older, and think that his style, or similar, might be more of a match for me than some crazy Poisoned Pawn Sicilian or such.>

I think there are a lot of similarities between Fischer and Botvinnik in temperament and approach -- they were both intense loners, they were researchers and did a lot of preparation. Botvinnik's D44 Semi-Slav was sort of his Poisoned Pawn, he ran lots of positional risks in the Winawer -- I think that is one difference between them, Fischer was more of a positional purist. Like Fischer Botvinnik was extremely aggressive with Black, at least when he was young. +23-5=1 with Black between 1944-1946 (two Soviet championships, Groningen, and the team matches with the Americans).

I don't think he was as talented as Fischer (slippery as that concept is) and obviously they played quite different openings, but I do see a lot of parallels.

Jan-03-17  todicav23: Botvinnik was also a successful engineer/scientist at the same time. He was not fully dedicated to chess, like Fischer and many other great players. According to Wikipedia he learned how to play chess late, when he was 12 years old. By comparison, Karjakin became grandmaster at the age of 12 years and 7 months.

Despite starting late and pursuing other activities Botvinnik is one of the greatest players ever.

Jan-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < todicav23: < diceman: <keypusher: But this isn't fair to Botvinnik, since he played until he was 59, and Fischer retired at the age of 29>

It's probably also not fair for Fischer.
We miss all the games he would have had in his prime.>

Of course it is not fair. Botvinnik was 37 in 1948. Fischer retired at 29, probably before he reached his peak. Fischer also played very strong players when he was very young. He was a WC candidate at 16.

According to this database, the overall record is:

Fischer: +420 -86 =246 (72.2%)
Botvinnik: +568 -138 =463 (68.4%) >

There are things that cut both ways. Not only did Fischer play many games as a teenager, it's my sense he played more often up to 1962 than after (at least until 1970), so a very high percentage of his games are from age 19 or less. Of course Botvinnik was nowhere near Fischer as a teenager.

On the other hand, Fischer did play a lot of games against relatively weaker opponents in the USA, while Botvinnik played very strong opponents almost his entire career (or at least until he lost the title for the last time).

You (and diceman) are right that Fischer might well have gotten stronger after 1972 if he'd kept playing. On the other hand, as with Morphy, what can you do? You have to consider the Fischer you have, not the Fischer you'd like to have.

<Fischer at his best (1968-1972) scored ~80% in world class tournaments and matches over more than 100 games.>

I'd like to compare this with Lasker, Capa, Botvinnik etc. but I haven't gotten around to it.

Jan-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <23 rounds! That's when people had time for chess. I guess these days it would be an 11 round tournament>

A 12-player event makes sense as many in this field were not legit contenders and had no realistic chance to go through to the candidates.

Jan-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <keypusher:

On the other hand, as with Morphy, what can you do?>

I think the only fair way with World Champions is look at the games at the time of their first championship.

I did it once. (dont remember where)

It was something like,

Fischer 70% win rates.
Kasparov 35% win rates.
Karpov 25% win rates.

Of course, even that's changing.

I consider "todays" candidates tournament somewhat silly.

Magnus only tie-breaked a 14 round tournament to sit across from Anand.

Fischer and the Ks are probably the last guys we can compare because of Interzonal/Candidate match formats/adjournment formats/and being pre-computer.

Jan-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  maxi: <keypusher: I think there are a lot of similarities between Fischer and Botvinnik in temperament and approach...> Fischer went over Botvinnik games with zeal. That explains in part the similarities in the approach.
Jan-07-17  savagerules: There's a short video out there at the end of the Botvinnik-Fischer game where a visibly relieved and smiling Botvinnik shakes hands of his fellow players for making a draw while Fischer looks pale and shocked for what he thought was a certain win. Botvinnik wore a casual short sleeve golf shirt while Fischer was dressed in a suit which kind of seemed disrespectful on the part of Botvinnik but then maybe he always wore golf shirts in tournaments but I doubt it.
Feb-16-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diagonal: Interzonal with 24 players, 15 Grandmasters, and 9 International Masters.

And one of the IM underdogs managed to qualify for the Candidate's: Robert Hübner, born in 1948 from Germany (his second / assistant at Palma was Hajo Hecht) finished equal 2nd with Efim Geller and Bent Larsen, behind Bobby Fischer. Subsequently, Hübner earned the Grandmaster title by FIDE.

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Fischer won this by a long way. He did well in WC qualifying events.

A while ago I asked this question:
<Does anyone have a list of Fischer's wins in strong, non-FIDÉ-qualifiers; international tournaments where he won undivided first prize. Just the strong ones.>

This was the eventual list (W-D-L):

Reykjavik 1960, 3-1-0
Monaco, 1967; 6-2-1
Skopje, 1967, 12-3-2
Netanya, 1968, 10-3-0
Vinkovci, 1968, 9-4-0
Zagreb, 1970, 10-6-1
Buenos Aires, 1970 13-4-0.

Some of those tournaments are pretty weak. I think he had one or two equal firsts as well.

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < savagerules: There's a short video out there at the end of the Botvinnik-Fischer game where a visibly relieved and smiling Botvinnik shakes hands of his fellow players for making a draw while Fischer looks pale and shocked for what he thought was a certain win. Botvinnik wore a casual short sleeve golf shirt while Fischer was dressed in a suit which kind of seemed disrespectful on the part of Botvinnik but then maybe he always wore golf shirts in tournaments but I doubt it.>

Not always, but if you google you'll find plenty of Soviet (and non-Soviet) masters dressed that way, whether they are playing Fischer or not. Even for the 1960s Fischer was unusual in his degree of devotion to the suit.

<"I hate ready-made suits, button-down collars, and sports shirts," he once said. "I don't want to look like a bum. I get up in the morning, I put on a suit.">

Fischer v. Keres at Curacao, Keres casually dressed:

Fischer vs Keres, 1962

On the other hand, Tal wore a suit at the same event:

Fischer vs Tal, 1962

Petrosian v. Tal at Curacao, Tal casual, Petrosian besuited:

Petrosian vs Tal, 1962

You've probably seen this picture, from the 1971 candidates final:

Petrosian vs Fischer, 1971

Spassky wore sports shirts throughout at Havana 1966.

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <Some of those tournaments are pretty weak. I think he had one or two equal firsts as well.>

His only equal first was Mar del Plata 1960.

Feb-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diagonal: *Tournament* results of Bobby Fischer in closed (invitation AND official) classical chess:

<1958 Interzonal Portoroz, 5th - 6th> (together with Olafsson, qualifying for the Candidate’s, thus both players awarded automatically the Grandmaster title by FIDE; Tal was winner ahead of Gligoric);

<1959 Mar del Plata, 3rd - 4th> (behind the winners Najdorf and Pachman, third alongside with Ivkov), Pachman and Fischer took a travel tour to Santiago held soon afterwards in neighboring Chile;

<1959 Santiago de Chile, 4th - 6th> (winners Ivkov and Pachman, 3. Pilnik, 4.-6. Sanchez, Sanguinetti, Fischer);

<1959 Zurich, 3rd - 4th> (behind winner Tal and runner-up Gligoric, third with Keres);

<1959 Candiate’s Bled- Zagreb- Belgrade, 5th- 6th> (Tal won ahead of Keres);

<1960 Mar del Plata, 1st - 2nd> (shared with Spassky, both at 13.5/15, four top players, many local players);

<1960 Buenos Aires (150 Anniv of May Revolution), 13th - 16th> (winners Korchnoi and Reshevsky, Fischer below 50%, joint with Pachman, Wexler, Ivkov; 20 players);

<1960 Reykjavik (Mini tournament), 1st>;

<1961 Bled, 2nd> (behind Tal, ahead of 3.-5. Petrosian, Keres, Gligoric);

<1962 Interzonal Stockholm, 1st>;

<1962 Candidate’s Curacao 4th> (Petrosian won that notorious event);

<1965 Havana (Capablanca Memorial, then a world elite series), 2nd - 4th> (behind Smyslov, shared with Ivkov, Geller, ahead of Kholmov);

<1966 Santa Monica (Piatigorsky Cup), 2nd> (behind Spassky);

<1967 Monte Carlo (Monaco), 1st>;

<1967 Skopje (Turnir solidarnost), 1st>;

<1967 Interzonal Sousse withdrew in leading position> (Larsen emerged as winner);

<1968 Netanya, Israel, 1st>;

<1968 Vinkovci, 1st>;

<1970 Rovinj-Zagreb, 1st>;

<1970 Buenos Aires, 1st> (3.5 points ahead of 2. Tukmakov);

<1970 Interzonal Palma de Mallorca, 1st>

Overall, Fischer played in 20 (excluding IZT Sousse) international closed (round robin all-play-all) tournaments in classical chess, winning ten of them.

Feb-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diagonal: (continuation)

Fischer never participated in some of the prime series of his time: Hastings, Hoogovens Beverwijk / Wijk aan Zee, IBM-Amsterdam, Bosna Sarajevo, Chigorin Memorial Sochi, etc.

1966 Santa Monica (Piatigorsky Cup), was the only individual international tournament in which Fischer faced the then reigning World Champion (drawing twice Tigran Petrosian).

From 1967 to 1970, Bobby Fischer was unbeaten in 53 consecutive classical games. He was undefeated in the last 5 games at Skopje 1967. He was undefeated in 10 games at Sousse IZT 1967, undefeated in 13 games at Netanya 1968, undefeated in 13 games at Vinkovci 1968, 1 win at the New York Metropolitan League, undefeated in 4 games at the 1970 USSR vs Rest of the World match, and won the first 7 rounds at Rovinj/Zagreb 1970 before losing to V. Kovacevic in round 8. The streak from 1967 to 1970 mainly consisted in events of mixed-strength fields with comparatively a few top players (except at Palma de Mallorca IZT 1970 (Fischer's last closed classical tournament, but there Petrosian, Spassky and Korchnoi were all prequalified and thus absent).

Between 1970 and 1972 then, the precision and energy that Fischer played with is just unmatched in the history of chess: Fischer won 20 straight games from 1970 to 1971 against the strongest players in the world, among them Taimanov (beaten 6-0), Larsen (beaten 6-0), and Petrosian). Later, as reigning World Champion (1972-1975), Fischer played no tournament or public games.

Footnotes:

i) Non-closed tournaments, International Open (selection):

1957 Winner of the U.S. Open (in Cleveland), joint with Bisguier.

Worth mentioning: 1956 participant in the Canadian Open (in Montreal): The first Canadian Open tournament in Montreal 1956 was noteworthy for the presence of 13-year-old Bobby Fischer, future World Chess Champion, who tied for 8-12th places.

ii) Non-classical chess tournaments (rare at that time):

1970 Herceg Novi (blitz), 1st; 17 wins, 4 draws, and one loss (to Korchnoi) in a top field, double round robin, in total 6-0 versus the former World Champions Smyslov, Tal, and Petrosian.

iii) Non-international tournaments:

National U.S. Champion eight times in eight attempts! 1957/8, 1958/9, 1959/0, 1960/1, 1962/3, 1963/4, 1965 (december), 1966 (december)

Matches and Team Events are by definition not part of this specific international *tournament* survey.

Bobby Fischer lived 64 years: the number of squares on the chessboard which gave him life. R.I.P.

Feb-27-17  ughaibu: Fischer wasn't undefeated at Sousse 1967, he lost at least one by default.
Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diagonal: Technically yes, I should have add 'undefeated otb'. Chessgames (Fischer ist marked at +7-0=3) provides a precise survey of the forfeits: Sousse Interzonal (1967).
Feb-28-17  ughaibu: Okay, but you included at least one win by default in your statistics. So it's difficult to see how excluding his losses could be justified. However, as I recall it, his Sousse games were all removed from the tournament record, so they're now informal games.
Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <keypusher....Even for the 1960s Fischer was unusual in his degree of devotion to the suit.>

This in distinct contrast to his ways as late as 1959--photos of the candidates featuring Fischer do not display sartorial splendour by any stretch of one's imagination.

Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Because of Fischer, I always wore suits. In some tournaments, I was the only player in a suit.

But, then again, some players showed up in their pajamas. And some had teddy bears sitting by the boards (Thanks, Judit!).

I hate those players.

Feb-28-17  Howard: A suit may be going a bit overboard, OMO. But a nice dress shirt and tie? Nothing wrong with that!

As for showing up in pajamas...well, didn't the late Igor Iganov once show up for a U.S. championship game dressed in nothing but a swim suit ?

Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  john barleycorn: < TheFocus> you must have been terrorized by those 4 years old opponents playing you blindold holding a yellow dinosaur a la <Goldsby I>
Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: I was more terrified of the four year olds who were holding bobble-head dolls of <AJGoldsby>.

In the other hand, they clutched... "The List."

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