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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Karlsbad Tournament

Akiba Rubinstein15/20(+12 -2 =6)[games]
Geza Maroczy14.5/20(+10 -1 =9)[games]
Paul Saladin Leonhardt13.5/20(+9 -2 =9)[games]
Aron Nimzowitsch12.5/20(+8 -3 =9)[games]
Carl Schlechter12.5/20(+8 -3 =9)[games]
Milan Vidmar12/20(+9 -5 =6)[games]
Richard Teichmann11.5/20(+7 -4 =9)[games]
Oldrich Duras11.5/20(+10 -7 =3)[games]
Georg Salwe11/20(+7 -5 =8)[games]
Heinrich Wolf10.5/20(+5 -4 =11)[games]
Frank James Marshall10/20(+6 -6 =8)[games]
Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky10/20(+8 -8 =4)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann9.5/20(+7 -8 =5)[games]
Savielly Tartakower9/20(+8 -10 =2)[games]
David Janowski8.5/20(+8 -11 =1)[games]
Johann Nepomuk Berger7.5/20(+2 -7 =11)[games]
Mikhail Chigorin7.5/20(+6 -11 =3)[games]
Jacques Mieses7.5/20(+6 -11 =3)[games]
Adolf Georg Olland6.5/20(+6 -13 =1)[games]
Erich Cohn5/20(+4 -14 =2)[games]
Paul F Johner4.5/20(+3 -14 =3)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Karlsbad (1907)
This was the first of four great Karlsbad tournaments, the others being Karlsbad (1911), Karlsbad (1923), and Karlsbad (1929). It featured a number of younger players who would take leading roles in the chess world over the next quarter of a century facing a strong group of more established Masters. Here is a list of the participants, arranged by age:

Johann Nepomuk Berger (1845-1933) Mikhail Chigorin (1850-1908) Georg Salwe (1862-1920) Jacques Mieses (1865-1954) Adolf Georg Olland (1867-1933) David Janowski (1868-1927) Richard Teichmann (1868-1925) Geza Maroczy (1870-1951) Carl Schlechter (1874-1918) Heinrich Wolf (1875-1943) Frank James Marshall (1877-1944) Paul Saladin Leonhardt (1877-1934) Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky (1879-1965) Oldrich Duras (1882-1957) Akiba Rubinstein (1882-1961) Rudolf Spielmann (1883-1942) Erich Cohn (1884-1918) Milan Vidmar (1885-1962) Aron Nimzowitsch (1886-1935) Savielly Tartakower (1887-1956) Paul F Johner (1887-1938)

Looking at this list today, some of the younger players would seem to be the favorites. At this time, however, though most of them had been active for several years, they probably would have still been considered "promising young players" rather than top-class masters. My hunch is that the smart Chessbucks would have been riding on Maroczy and Schlechter, with Marshall and Janowski picking up their fair share as well.

The time control was 30 moves in two hours, followed by 15 moves per hour therafter. A more modern provision forbade agreed draws before move 45 without the permission of the tournament director. This had the usual effect, with only 40 of the 210 games ending in this manner.

Round 1: Tuesday, August 20

1 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Wolf
2 Vidmar 1 Olland
3 Dus Chotimirsky 0 Chigorin
4 Janowski 1 Cohn
5 Tartakower 0 Maroczy
6 Duras 1/2 Schlechter
7 Mieses 1 Marshall
8 Salwe 1 Leonhardt
9 Berger 1/2 Spielmann
10 Johner 0 Teichmann
Rubinstein - BYE

The established players got off to a good start, Vidmar being the only winner under age 30. Maroczy was the star, as his win over Tartakower would be awarded the first prize for beauty. Rubinstein started with a bye in the 21-player field; this will be indicated by an "*" following the player's name.

1.0: Chigorin, Janowski, Maroczy, Mieses, Teichmann, Vidmar; <0.5>: Berger, Duras, Leonhardt, Nimzowitsch, Salwe, Schlechter, Spielmann, Wolf; <0.0>: Cohn, Dus Chotimirsky, Johner, Olland, Marshall, Rubinstein*, Tartakower

Round 2: Thursday, August 22

11 Spielmann 1 Johner
12 Leonhardt 1/2 Berger
13 Marshall 1/2 Salwe
14 Schlechter 1 Mieses
15 Maroczy 1 Duras
16 Cohn 0 Tartakower
17 Chigorin 0 Janowski
18 Olland 1 Dus Chotimirsky
19 Wolf 0 Vidmar
20 Rubinstein 0 Nimziwitsch
Teichmann - BYE

Three leaders emerged today. Janowski needed 99 moves before his mighty rook pair overcame Chigorin's queen. (It might be coincidence, but Janowski would lose his next four games and never be a factor thereafter.) Duras, warming up for bigger and better things, held out for 63 moves against Maroczy's extra pawn and mighty knight pair. Vidmar sacrificed a piece against Wolf, eventually winning with a mighty connected passed pawn trio in the endgame. And that's not s typo at the end of the standings: Rubinstein was still in the cellar after a loss to Nimzowitsch. Our copy of the game includes Nimzo's notes, and the game is well worth looking at as a classic example of using hanging pawns effectively.

2.0: Janowski, Maroczy, Vidmar; <1.5>: Nimzowitsch, Schlechter, Spielmann; <1.0>: Berger, Chigorin, Leonhardt, Mieses, Olland, Salwe, Tartakower, Teichmann*; <0.5>: Duras, Marshall, Wolf; <0.0> Cohn, Dus Chotimirsky, Johner, Rubinstein*

Round 3: Friday, August 23

21 Vidmar 1/2 Rubinstein
22 Dus Chotimirsky 1/2 Wolf
23 Janowski 0 Olland
24 Tartakower 1 Chigorin
25 Duras 1 Cohn
26 Mieses 1/2 Maroczy
27 Salwe 1 Schlechter
28 Berger 1/2 Marshall
29 Johner 0 Leonhardt
30 Teichmann 1 Spielmann
Nimzowitsch - BYE

No perfect scores survived the day. Janowski's descent began when Olland sprang a combination winning queen and two pawns for rook and knight. Maroczy was fortunate to survive against Mieses in a B+P ending, while Vidmar and Rubinstein avoided each other's traps and quickly exchanged down to a barren equality. Among the two-pointers, Teichmann was in good shape (having already had the bye) and Salwe powerfully outplayed Schlechter. The long draw Berger - Marshall is worth looking at for Marshall's ingenious play and a knight that apparently began life on the wrong square.

2.5: Maroczy, Vidmar; <2.0>: Janowski, Leonhardt, Olland, Salwe, Tartakower, Teichmann*; <1.5>: Berger, Duras, Mieses, Nimzowitsch*, Schlechter, Spielmann; <1.0>: Chigorin, Marshall, Wolf; <0.5>: Dus Chotimirsky, Rubinstein*; <0.0>: Cohn, Johner

Round 4: Saturday, August 24

31 Leonhardt 1/2 Teichmann
32 Marshall 1 Johner
33 Schlechter 1 Berger
34 Maroczy 1 Salwe
35 Cohn 0 Mieses
36 Chigorin 0 Duras
37 Olland 0 Tartakower
38 Wolf 1 Janowski
39 Rubinstein 1 Dus Chotimirsky
40 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Vidmar
Spielmann - BYE

Maroczy took the sole lead with a nice positional crush of Salwe. Vidmar was fortunate to draw with Nimzowitch; after an opening which only Nimzo could have thought up, Black was close to being Samisched but managed to randomize the position and survive after an error by White. Rubinstein got his first win, blasting open the center after a slow opening to win material with a persistent attack. The wins by Mieses and Marshall were typical, and you can guess what that means.

3.5: Maroczy; <3.0>: Tartakower, Vidmar; <2.5>: Duras, Leonhardt, Mieses, Schlechter, Teichmann*; <2.0>: Janowski, Marshall, Nimzowitsch*, Olland, Salwe, Wolf; <1.5>: Berger, Rubinstein*, Spielmann; <1.0>: Chigorin; <0.5>: Dus Chotimirsky; <0.0>: Cohn, Johner

Round 5: Monday, August 26

41 Dus Chotimirsky 1 Nimzowitsch
42 Janowski 0 Rubinstein
43 Tartakower 0 Wolf
44 Duras 1 Olland
45 Mieses 1 Chigorin
46 Salwe 1 Cohn
47 Berger 1/2 Maroczy
48 Johner 0 Schlecther
49 Teichmann 1/2 Marshall
50 Spielmann 1/2 Leonhardt
Vidmar - BYE

Maroczy's quiet draw with Berger was enough to keep the lead, as Tartakower was eaten alive by Wolf and Vidmar received the bye. Moving up with victories were Duras (despite missing a mate-in-three which has appeared in every combination book written since the day it was not played), Mieses (after a massive battle with Chigorin), and Schlechter (with a fine all-around performance against Johner). Rubinstein reached and won a rook ending against Janowski with some subtle play. Dus Chotimirsky's win over Nimzowitsch was a very powerful performance.

4.0: Marcczy; <3.5>: Duras, Mieses, Schlechter; <3.0>: Leonhardt, Salwe, Tartakower, Teichmann*, Vidmar*, Wolf; <2.5>: Marshall, Rubinstein*; <2.0>: Berger, Janowski, Nimzowitsch*, Olland, Spielmann*; <1.5>: Dus Chotimirsky; <1.0>: Chigorin; <0.0>: Cohn, Johner

Round 6: Tuesday, August 27

51 Marshall 1/2 Spielmann
52 Schlechter 0 Teichmann
53 Maroczy 1 Johner
54 Cohn 1/2 Berger
55 Chigorin 1/2 Salwe
56 Olland 0 Mieses
57 Wolf 1 Duras
58 Rubinstein 1 Tartakower
59 Nimzowitsch 1 Janowski
60 Vidmar 1 Dus Chotimirsky
Leonhardt - BYE

More flip-flopping at the upper levels. Maroczy held his spot by refuting a faulty pawn sacrifice from Johner, and Mieses pulled off a brilliancy against Olland. Schlechter blundered a pawn to Teichmann, who finished with a brilliant breakthrough. Wolf - Duras culminated in an ending that has been marvelled at ever since. Rubinstein continued to move methodically up the ladder.

Standings after round 6 (* indicates player has had the bye):

5.0: Maroczy; <4.5>: Mieses; <4.0>: Teichmann*, Vidmar*, Wolf; <3.5>: Duras, Rubinstein*, Salwe, Schlechter; <3.0>: Leonhardt*, Marshall, Nimzowitsch*, Tartakower; <2.5>: Berger, Spielmann*; <2.0>: Janowski, Olland; <1.5>: Chigorin, Dus Chotimirsky; <0.5>: Cohn; <0.0>: Johner

Round 7 (Thursday, August 29)

61 Janowski 1 Vidmar
62 Tartakower 1 Nimzowitsch
63 Duras 0 Rubinstein
64 Mieses 1 Wolf
65 Salwe 1 Olland
66 Berger 1 Chigorin
67 Johner 0 Cohn
68 Teichmann 1/2 Maroczy
69 Spielmann 1/2 Schlechter
70 Leonhardt 1/2 Marshall
Dus Chotimirsky - BYE

Mieses drew even with Maroczy with yet another fine win. Pulling within a point of the leaders were Rubinstein and Teichmann (who were well-placed, as both had recorded their bye) and Salwe (whose victory Marco attributed to the sparkling mineral water of the spa). Janowski finally got back on track with an interesting win over Vidmar.

Standings after round 7 (* indicates player has had the bye):

5.5 Maroczy, Mieses; <4.5>: Rubinstein*, Salwe, Teichmann*; <4.0>: Schlechter, Tartakower, Vidmar*, Wolf; <3.5>: Berger, Duras, Leonhardt*, Marshall; <3.0>: Janowski, Nimzowitsch*, Spielmann*; <2.0> Olland; <1.5>: Chigorin, Cohn, Dus Chotimirsky*; <0.0>: Johner

Round 8 (Friday, August 30)

71 Schlechter 1 Leonhardt
72 Maroczy 1 Spielmann
73 Cohn 0 Teichmann
74 Chigorin 1 Johner
75 Olland 1 Berger
76 Wolf 1/2 Salwe
77 Rubinstein 1/2 Mieses
78 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Duras
79 Vidmar 1 Tartakower
80 Dus Chotimirsky 1 Janowski
Marshall - BYE

A draw between Mieses and Rubinstein allowed Maroczy to go back in front with a quiet positional win over Spielmann, while Teichmann pulled into clear third with a destructive win over Cohn.

Standings after round 8 (* indicates player has had the bye):

6.5: Maroczy; <6.0>: Mieses; <5.5>: Teichmann*; <5.0>: Rubinstein*, Salwe, Schlechter, Vidmar*; <4.5>: Wolf; <4.0>: Duras, Tartakower; <3.5>: Berger, Leonhardt*, Marshall*, Nimzowitsch*; <3.0>: Janowski, Olland, Spielmann*; <3.5>: Chigorin, Dus Chotimirsky*; <1.5> Cohn; <0.0> Johner

Round 9 (Saturday, August 31)

81 Tartakower 1 Dus Chotimirski
82 Duras 0 Vidmar
83 Mieses 0 Nimzowitsch
84 Salwe 0 Rubinstein
85 Berger 1/2 Wolf
86 Johner 0 Olland
87 Teichmann 0 Chigorin
88 Spielmann 1 Cohn
89 Leonhardt 1 Maroczy
90 Marshall 1/2 Schlechter
Janowski - BYE

There was a reshuffling at the top as the three leading players all lost. Rubinstein resumed his advance by knocking Salwe back, with Leonhardt and Nimzowitsch also moving up. Johner may have missed a chance to get on the board.

6.5: Maroczy; <6.0>: Mieses, Rubinstein*, Vidmar*; <5.5>: Schlechter, Teichmann*; <5.0>: Salwe, Tartakower, Wolf; <4.5>: Leonhardt*, Nimzowitsch*; <4.0>: Berger, Duras, Marshall*, Olland, Spielmann*; <3.5>: Chigorin; <3.0>: Janowski*; <2.5>: Dus Chotimirsky*; <1.5>: Cohn; <0.0>: Johner

Round 10 (Monday, September 2)

91 Maroczy 1 Marshall
92 Cohn 1 Leonhardt
93 Chigorin 1 Spielmann
94 Olland 1/2 Teichmann
95 Wolf 1/2 Johner
96 Rubinstein 1 Berger
97 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Salwe
98 Vidmar 1 Mieses
99 Dus Chotimirsky 0 Duras
100 Janowski 1 Tartakower
Schlechter - Bye

A crucial game between Vidmar and Mieses went the younger man's way, while Maroczy and Rubinstein also won excellent games to retain their places. Chigorin's win over Spielmann was particularly exciting, as might have been expected. And most everyone was happy to see Johner finally get on the board, though Wolf filed a strong minority opinion in the matter.

Standings after round 10 (* indicates player has had the bye):

7.5: Maroczy; <7.0>: Rubinstein*, Vidmar*; <6.0>: Mieses, Teichmann*; <5.5>: Salwe, Schlechter*, Wolf; <5.0>: Duras, Nimzowitsch*, Tartakower; <4.5>: Chigorin, Leonhardt*, Olland; <4.0>: Berger. Janowski*, Marshall*, Spielmann*; <2.5>: Cohn, Dus Chotimirsky*; <0.5>: Johner

Round 11 (Tuesday, September 3)

101 Duras 1 Janowski
102 Mieses 0 Dus Chotimirsky
103 Salwe 1/2 Vidmar
104 Berger 1/2 Nimzowitsch
105 Johner 0 Rubinstein
106 Teichmann 1 Wolf
107 Spielmann 1 Olland
108 Leonhardt 1/2 Chigorin
109 Marshall 1 Cohn
110 Schlechter 1/2 Maroczy
Tartakower - BYE

Rubinstein's fine play in an opposite-colored bishop ending enabled him to tie for first as Maroczy drew with Schlechter. Vidmar also drew, and Teichmann was fortunate to keep up when Wolf could not convert his advantage. Mieses' slide continued with a loss to Dus Chotimirsky.

Standings after round 11 (* indicates player has had the bye):

8.0: Maroczy, Rubinstein*; <7.5>: Vidmar*; <7.0>: Teichmann*; <6.0>: Duras, Mieses, Salwe, Schlechter*: <5.5>: Nimzowitsch*, Wolf; <5.0>: Chigorin, Leonhardt*, Marshall*, Spielmann*, Tartakower*; <4.5>: Berger, Olland; <4.0>: Janowski*; <3.5>: Dus Chotimirsky*; <2.5>: Cohn; <0.5>: Johner

Round 12 (Thursday, September 5)

111 Cohn 0 Schlechter
112 Chigorin 1 Marshall
113 Olland 0 Leonhardt
114 Wolf 1 Spielmann
115 Rubinstein 1 Teichmann
116 Nimzowitsch 1 Johner
117 Vidmar 1/2 Berger
118 Dus Chotimirsky 1 Salwe
119 Janowski 1 Mieses
120 Tartakower 0 JoingDuras
Maroczy - BYE

Maroczy's bye allowed Rubinstein to go into the sole lead for the first time, having scored nine points from his last ten games. Vidmar joined Maroczy with a quiet draw, while Schlechter and Duras picked up important wins against Teichmann and Mieses.

Standings after round 12 (* indicates player has had the bye):

9.0: Rubinstein*; <8.0>: Vidmar*, Maroczy*; <7.0>: Duras, Schlechter*, Teichmann*; <6.5>: Nimzowitsch*, Wolf; <6.0> Chigorin, Leonhardt*, Mieses, Salwe; <5.0>: Berger, Janowski*, Marshall*, Spielmann*, Tartakower*; <4.5>: Dus Chotimirsky*, Olland; <2.5>: Cohn; <0.5> Johner

Round 13 (Friday, September 6):

121 Mieses 1 Tartakower
122 Salwe 1 Janowski
123 Berger 0 Dus Chotimirski
124 Johner 1 Vidmar
125 Teichmann 1/2 Nimzowitsch
126 Spielmann 1 Rubinstein
127 Leonhardt 1/2 Wolf
128 Marshall 1 Olland
129 Schlechter 1/2 Chigorin
130 Maroczy 1 Cohn
Duras - BYE

Not a very fortunate round for two of the leaders, as Vidmar suffered Johner's first win and Rubinstein found himself on the wrong side of Spielmann's beauty prize winner. Mieses also took home a beauty prize for his victory, while more mundane matters saw Maroczy climb back into a tie for first while Schlechter and Teichmann missed chances to close the gap.

Standings after round 13 (* indicates player has had the bye):

9.0: Maroczy*, Rubinstein*; <8.0>: Vidmar*; <7.5>: Schlechter*, Teichmann*; <7.0>: Duras*, Mieses, Nimzowitsch*, Salwe, Wolf; <6.5>: Chigorin, Leonhardt*; <6.0>: Marshall*, Spielmann*; <5.5>: Dus Chotimirsky*; <5.0>: Berger, Janowski*, Tartakower*; <4.5>: Olland; <2.5>: Cohn; <1.5>: Johner

Round 14 (Saturday, September 7)

131 Chigorin 0 Maroczy
132 Olland 0 Schlechter
133 Wolf 1/2 Marshall
134 Rubinstein 1/2 Leonhardt
135 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Spielmann
136 Vidmar 1 Teichmann
137 Dus Chotimirsky 1 Johner
138 Janowski 1 Berger
139 Tartakower 1/2 Salwe
140 Duras 1 Mieses
Cohn - BYE

The two-thirds mark saw Maroczy creep to the top again, while Vidmar kept pace with an important win over Teichmann. Janowski, at least according to the tournament book, made something out of nothing and was awarded a share of the third Beauty prize.

Standings after round 14 (* indicates player has had the bye):

10.0: Maroczy*; <9.5>: Rubinstein*; <9.0>: Vidmar*; <8.5>: Schlechter*; <8.0>: Duras*; <7.5>: Nimzowitsch*, Salwe, Teichmann*, Wolf; <7.0> Leonhardt*, Mieses; <6.5>: Chigorin, Dus Chotimirsky*, Marshall*, Spielmann*; <6.0>: Janowski*; <5.5> Tartakower*; <5.0>: Berger; <4.5>: Olland; <2.5>: Cohn*; <1.5>: Johner

Round 15 (Monday, September 9)

141 Salwe 1 Duras
142 Berger 1/2 Tartakower
143 Johner 0 Janowski
144 Teichmann 1/2 Dus Chotimirsky
145 Spielmann 0 Vidmar
146 Leonhardt 1/2 Nimzowitsch
147 Marshall 0 Rubinstein
148 Schlechter 1/2 Wolf
149 Maroczy 1 Olland
150 Cohn 1 Chigorin
Mieses - BYE

The top three held their serve, while Schlechter fell another half-point behind. I'll give away a little of the story to say that one of those three won't up there six rounds from now. You might take a look at the standings and guess who will catch up. The most famous game of the round saw Cohn lose a pawn in the opening, but he made something out of less than nothing and was awarded a share of the 2nd Beauty prize.

Standings after round 15 (* indicates player has had the bye):

11.0: Maroczy*; <10.5>: Rubinstein*; <10.0>: Vidmar*; <9.0>: Schlechter*; <8.5>: Salwe; <8.0>: Duras*, Nimzowitsch*, Teichmann*; Wolf; <7.5>: Leonhardt*; <7.0>: Dus Chotimirsky*, Janowski*, Mieses*; <6.5>: Chigorin, Marshall*, Spielmann*; <6.0>: Tartakower*; <5.5>: Berger; <4.5>: Olland; <3.5>: Cohn*; <1.5>: Johner

Round 16 (Tuesday, September 10)

151 Olland 1 Cohn
152 Wolf 1/2 Maroczy
153 Rubinstein 1/2 Schlechter
154 Nimzowitsch 0 Marshall
155 Vidmar 0 Leonhardt
156 Dus Chotimirsky 1 Spielmann
157 Janowski 1/2 Teichmann
158 Tartakower 1 Johner
159 Duras 1 Berger
160 Mieses 0 Salwe
Chigorin - BYE

Maroczy drew when he wanted to, the tournament book noting that Wolf "played energetically for the draw". Rubinstein took no chances with Schlechter, but bot players were able to pick up ground on Vidmar whose loss to Leonhardt was a sign of things to come.

Standings after round 16 (* indicates player has had the bye):

11.5: Maroczy*; <11.0>: Rubinstein*; <10.0>: Vidmar*; <9.5>: Salwe, Schlechter*; <9.0>: Duras*; <8.5>: Leonhardt*, Teichmann*, Wolf; <8.0>: Dus Chotimirsky*, Nimzowitsch*; <7.5>: Janowski*, Marshall*; <7.0>: Mieses*, Tartakower*; <6.5>: Chigorin*, Spielmann*; <5.5>: Berger, Olland; <3.5>: Cohn*; <1.5>: Johner

Round 17 (Thursday, September 12)

161 Berger 1 Mieses
162 Johner 1 Duras
163 Teichmann 1 Tartakower
164 Spielmann 1 Janowski
165 Leonhardt 1 Dus Chotimirsky
166 Marshall 1 Vidmar
167 Schlechter 0 Nimzowitsch
168 Maroczy 1/2 Rubinstein
169 Cohn 1/2 Wolf
170 Chigorin 1 Olland
Salwe - BYE

Maroczy could have taken a big step toward the first prize by winning. He gave it a good try, building a strong attack, but Rubinstein found a fine resource by sacrificing the exchange for a pawn and a strong defensive position. Maroczy counter-sacrificed in an attempt to win, but an even endgame was the result. Meanwhile, yet another loss by Vidmar left the race for third place wide open.

Standings after round 17 (* indicates player has had the bye):

12.0: Maroczy*; <11.5>: Rubinstein*; <10.0>: Vidmar*; <9.5>: Leonhardt*, Salwe*, Schlechter*, Teichmann*; <9.0>: Duras*, Nimzowitsch*, Wolf; <8.5>: Marshall*; <8.0>: Dus Chotimirsky*; <7.5>: Chigorin*, Janowski*;, Spielmann*; <7.0>: Mieses*, Tartakower*; <6.5>: Berger; <5.5>: Olland; <4.0>: Cohn*; <2.5>: Johner

Round 18 (Friday, September 13)

171 Wolf 1 Chigorin
172 Rubinstein 1 Cohn
173 Nimzowitsch 1/2 Maroczy
174 Vidmar 1/2 Schlechter
175 Dus Chotimirsky 0 Marshall
176 Janowski 0 Leonhardt
177 Tartakower 1 Spielmann
178 Duras 1 Teichmann
179 Mieses 0 Johner
180 Salwe 1 Berger
Olland - BYE

The tension increased as Rubinstein overtook Maroczy with just three rounds to go. Vidmar was joined in third place by Leonhardt and Salwe, while three other players lurked but a half-point behind.

Standings after round 18 (* indicates player has had the bye):

12.5: Maroczy*, Rubinstein*; <10.5>: Leonhardt*, Salwe*, Vidmar*; <10.0>: Duras*, Schlechter*, Wolf; <9.5>: Marshall*, Nimzpwitsch*, Teichmann*; <8.0>: Dus Chotimisky*, Tartakower*; <7.5>: Chigorin*, Janowski*, Spielmann*; <7.0>: Mieses*; <6.5>: Berger; <5.5>: Olland*; <4.0>: Cohn*; <3.5>: Johner

Round 19 (Saturday, September 14)

181 Johner 1/2 Salwe
182 Teichmann 1/2 Mieses
183 Spielmann 0 Duras
184 Leonhardt 1 Tartakower
185 Marshall 0 Janowski
186 Schlechter 1/2 Dus Chotimirsky
187 Maroczy 1/2 Vidmar
188 Cohn 0 Nimzowitsch
189 Chigorin 0 Rubinstein
190 Olland 1 Wolf
Berger - BYE

The leaders both reached equal positions. Maroczy and Vidmar agreed to a draw, and Rubinstein offered one to Chigorin. However, the Old Russian apparently spotted a winning chance, and probably figured he could draw with Rubinstein when he wanted to. This was a misjudgment.

Leonhardt moved into sole third place with his fourth win a row, and took home a share of the 2nd Beauty prize to boot. Duras lulled Spielmann to sleep in a sprightly 99-mover, while Cohn launched what might be The Worst Kingside Attack of All Time.

Standings after round 19 (* indicates player has had the bye):

13.5: Rubinstein*; <13.0>: Maroczy*; <11.5>: Leonhardt*; <11.0>: Duras*, Salwe*, Vidmar*; <10.5>: Nimzowitsch*, Schlechter*; <10.0>: Teichmann*, Wolf; <9.5>: Marshall*; <8.5>: Dus Chotimirsky*, Janowski*; <8.0>: Tartakower*; <7.5>: Chigorin*, Mieses*, Spielmann*; <6.5>: Berger*, Olland*; <4.0>: Cohn*, Johner

Round 20 (Monday, September 16)

191 Rubinstein 1 Olland
192 Nizmowitsch 1 Chigorin
193 Vidmar 0 Cohn
194 Dus Chotimirsky 1/2 Maroczy
195 Janowski 0 Schlechter
196 Tartakower 1 Marshall
197 Duras 0 Leonhardt
198 Mieses 0 Spielmann
199 Salwe 0 Teichmann
200 Berger 1/2 Johner
Wolf - BYE

For the third straight round Rubinstein won while Maroczy only drew. This gave the former a full-point lead with only a game versus Wolf, the tournament's drawing master. The struggle seemed over for all intents and purposes. Meanwhile, Leonhardt won his fifth straight game to all but nail down third place.

Standings after round 20 (* indicates player has had the bye):

14.5: Rubinstein*; <13.5>: Maroczy*; <12.5>: Leonhardt*; <11.5>: Nimzowitsch*, Schlechter*; <11.0>: Duras*, Salwe*, Teichmann*, Vidmar*; <10.0>: Wolf*; <9.5>: Marshall*; <9.0>: Dus Chotimirsky*, Tartakower*; <8.5>: Janowski*, Spielmann*; <7.5>: Chigorin*, Mieses*; <7.0>: Berger*; <6.5>: Olland*; <5.0>: Cohn*; <4.5>: Johner

Round 21 (Tuesday, September 17)

201 Teichmann 1/2 Burger
202 Spielmann 1 Salwe
203 Leonhardt 1 Mieses
204 Marshall 1/2 Duras
205 Schlechter 1 Tartakower
206 Maroczy 1 Janowski
207 Cohn 0 Dus Chotimirsky
208 Chigorin 0 Vidmar
209 Olland 0 Nimzowitsch
210 Wolf 1/2 Rubinstein
Johner - BYE

Rubinstein did get his draw in a fashion that became legendary. Hans Kmoch and Fred Reinfeld later* told the story that Wolf promised prior to the game to beat the "Polish upstart" to help his friend and compatriot Maroczy to win first prize in their home country. However, already after about 10 moves, Wolf made clear that he wasn't adverse to a draw. Rubinstein played on and quickly built up a crushing attack. When the winning continuation became obvious, Rubinstein forced a draw, explaining "Against Wolf I draw when I want to, not when he wants to!".

But I have to wonder if there is more (or less) to the story. In the tournament book, Georg Marco (a chatty soul who never missed a good story) doesn't refer to it at all. He attributed Rubinstein's missing the win as a case of him not trying his hardest to win when a draw would be sufficient. I haven't looked at contemporary sources, but it would be interesting to know what their take is. If our only source for the incident is Hans Kmoch's memory rather than documentary evidence, it might be needed to be taken with a grain of salt.

Elsewhere, Maroczy and Leonardt secured their places with wins. Nimzowitsch's =4th with Schlechter established him as a player to be watched. And the presence of many established stars in the middle to bottom of the crosstable indicated that the new generation needed to be taken serioiusly.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 1 Rubinstein * = = 0 = = 1 1 1 = 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 = 1 1 1 15.0 2 Maroczy = * 0 = = = = 1 1 = 1 = 1 1 1 = 1 = 1 1 1 14.5 3 Leonhardt = 1 * = 0 1 = 1 = = = 1 = 1 1 = = 1 1 0 1 13.5 4 Nimzowitsch 1 = = * 1 = = = = = 0 0 = 0 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 12.5 5 Schlechter = = 1 0 * = 0 = 0 = = = = 1 1 1 = 1 1 1 1 12.5 6 Vidmar = = 0 = = * 1 1 = 1 0 1 1 1 0 = 1 1 1 0 0 12.0 7 Teichmann 0 = = = 1 0 * 0 1 1 = = 1 1 = = 0 = = 1 1 11.5 8 Duras 0 0 0 = = 0 1 * 0 0 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 11.5 9 Salwe 0 0 = = 1 = 0 1 * = = 0 0 = 1 1 = 1 1 1 = 11.0 10 Wolf = = = = = 0 0 1 = * = = 1 1 1 = 1 0 0 = = 10.5 11 Marshall 0 0 = 1 = 1 = = = = * 1 = 0 0 = 0 0 1 1 1 10.0 12 Dus Chotimirsky 0 = 0 1 = 0 = 0 1 = 0 * 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 10.0 13 Spielmann 1 0 = = = 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 * 0 1 = 0 1 1 1 1 9.5 14 Tartakower 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 = 0 1 1 1 * 0 = 1 0 1 1 1 9.0 15 Janowski 0 0 0 0 0 1 = 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 * 1 1 1 0 1 1 8.5 16 Berger 0 = = = 0 = = 0 0 = = 0 = = 0 * 1 1 0 = = 7.5 17 Chigorin 0 0 = 0 = 0 1 0 = 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 * 0 1 0 1 7.5 18 Mieses = = 0 0 0 0 = 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 * 1 1 0 7.5 19 Olland 0 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 * 1 1 6.5 20 Cohn 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 = 0 0 0 0 0 = 1 0 0 * 1 5.0 21 Johner 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 = = 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 1 0 0 * 4.5

Saource: Hans Kmoch and Fred Reinfeld, Chess Review, October 1950, pp. 299-301. In John William Donaldson and Nikolay N Minev, The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein - Volume 1: Uncrowned King, 2nd edition, McFarland, 2007.

Original collection: Game Collection: Karlsbad 1907, by User: Phony Benoni.

 page 1 of 9; games 1-25 of 210  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Tartakower vs Dus Chotimirsky  1-0561907KarlsbadB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
2. Nimzowitsch vs Chigorin 1-0581907KarlsbadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
3. J N Berger vs Spielmann  ½-½451907KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
4. Vidmar vs Olland  1-0281907KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
5. Tartakower vs Maroczy 0-1571907KarlsbadB22 Sicilian, Alapin
6. Salwe vs Leonhardt  ½-½641907KarlsbadD05 Queen's Pawn Game
7. Nimzowitsch vs H Wolf  ½-½451907KarlsbadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
8. J Mieses vs Marshall 1-0441907KarlsbadB01 Scandinavian
9. P F Johner vs Teichmann 0-1361907KarlsbadD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
10. Janowski vs E Cohn 1-0311907KarlsbadD63 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense
11. Dus Chotimirsky vs Chigorin 0-1451907KarlsbadD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
12. Duras vs Schlechter  ½-½281907KarlsbadC50 Giuoco Piano
13. H Wolf vs Vidmar 0-1611907KarlsbadC29 Vienna Gambit
14. Spielmann vs P F Johner 1-0211907KarlsbadC55 Two Knights Defense
15. Schlechter vs J Mieses 1-0301907KarlsbadB01 Scandinavian
16. Rubinstein vs Nimzowitsch 0-1441907KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
17. Olland vs Dus Chotimirsky  1-0351907KarlsbadB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
18. Chigorin vs Janowski 0-1991907KarlsbadC30 King's Gambit Declined
19. E Cohn vs Tartakower  0-1451907KarlsbadD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
20. Leonhardt vs J N Berger  ½-½461907KarlsbadC54 Giuoco Piano
21. Maroczy vs Duras  1-0631907KarlsbadC49 Four Knights
22. Marshall vs Salwe  ½-½671907KarlsbadD60 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense
23. Vidmar vs Rubinstein  ½-½261907KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
24. Teichmann vs Spielmann 1-0381907KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
25. Tartakower vs Chigorin 1-0231907KarlsbadC28 Vienna Game
 page 1 of 9; games 1-25 of 210  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-26-12  Karpova: At Carlsbad 1907, Akiva went into the last round being a full point ahead of Maroczy. Even in case that Maroczy won (which he did), a draw was sufficient. In H Wolf vs Rubinstein, 1907 he first turned down Wolf's draw offer, then outplayed him until he reached a winning position but instead of going for the win (he did see it), he forced a draw and said "[...] with Wolf I make a draw when I want to - not when he wants to."

This way, it merely seems that Rubinstein was arrogant towards Wolf - which is neither consistent with his overall behaviour (he had an excellent reputation for good sportsmanship) or his play, apart from the fact that this was still when Akiva had to prove himself on the international chess scene.

The background of the story: Wolf was not only a close friend of Maroczy's but both were compatriots (they were both from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Carlsbad back then also belonged to the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy). Most people cheered for Maroczy, not only due to his fame and his dignified manners, but also because they were patriots and he was the local hero. Wolf went as far as to promise that he would beat the 'Polish upstart'. But already after 10 moves or so, Wolf made clear that he was was not averse to a draw. And then the game went on as described above with Rubinstein refusing and obtaining a winning position just to force a draw himself.

That's the anecdote with context and I think that the assessment of Rubinstein's behaviour changes considerably: He probably felt that his pride had been hurt, not only by the Austro-Hungarian crowd but especially by Wolf who after all promised to win and verbally degraded him. At least to me, Rubinstein's behaviour appears much less arrogant - but his and Wolf's behaviour seem to be quite childish. Wolf promised to show superiority over Rubinstein but faltered almost immediately by offering a draw and then Akiva reacted in the same, childish manner by deliberatly forcing a draw when he could have won.

Source is the 2nd edition of "The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein - Volume 1: Uncrowned King" by John Donaldson and Nikolay Minev, MacFarland, 2007

Nov-26-12  Blunderdome: I suppose if there were ratings back then, Rubinstein would have gone for the win.
Nov-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Karpova> That seems to be one good explanation of Rubinstein's behavior, and certainly more reasonable than eccentricity or even an early sign of his eventual mental problems. As a poor man from Polish Russia, he probably received little personal respect aside from the plaudits given to his chess play. An incident like this could have given him much satisfaction.

It's interesting that the incident is not mentioned in Marco and Schlecter's tournament book, but appears to be based on a later reminescence of Hans Kmoch. If anyone could produce a contemporary source from the incident besides Kmoch, it would be worth seeing.

It's important to ask because chess players seem to want explanations for the inexplicable, and inventing reasons is not unknown. Sometimes, stuff just happens.

Nov-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: A superb introduction. Whoever wrote that deserves some sort of award.

We are very lucky here at chessgames.com that people give their time and very considerable talent to produce quite outstanding prefaces to these historic tournaments.

Nov-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: The intro was by <Phony Benoni>.
Nov-09-13  Karpova: <Prize money> (in Kronen)

1. Rubinstein: 3,000

2. Maroczy: 2,000

3. Leonhardt: 1,400

4-5. Nimzowitsch and Schlechter share 1,000 + 800 (= 900 each)

6. Vidmar 600

7-8. Duras and Teichmann share 500 + 400 (= 450 each)

9. Salwe 300

10. Wolf 250

11-12. Dus Chotimirsky and Marshall share 200 + 150 (= 175 each)

The 9 players who did not win a prize received 100 Kronen each as <Spielhonorar> ("player's fee").

From page 358 of the October-November 1907 'Wiener Schachzeitung' (Supplementheft)

Rubinstein also received a Silver Cup as Honorary Prize of the German Chess Association (page 360).

<Brilliancy Prizes>

1. 300 Kronen to Maroczy for Tartakower vs Maroczy, 1907

2. 200 Kronen to Cohn for E Cohn vs Chigorin, 1907 and Leonhardt for Leonhardt vs Tartakower, 1907

3. 100 Kronen to Janowski for Janowski vs J N Berger, 1907 and Mieses for Mieses vs Tartakower, 1907

From page 363 of the October-November 1907 'Wiener Schachzeitung' (Supplementheft; originally from Dr. Falk in the 'Moskauer Deutschen Zeitung' of October 12, 1907)

From my first post Karlsbad (1907) the source given by Donaldson and Minev is Hans Kmoch and Fred Reinfeld on pp. 299-301 of the October 1950 'Chess Review'.

Feb-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Carlsbad Brilliancy Prizes

Maroczy, first prize of 300 crowns for his game against Tartakower.

Cohn and Leonhardt, each half of second prize of 200 crowns,for their games against Tschigorin and Tartakower, respectively.

Janowski and Mieses, each half of the third prize of 100 crowns for their games with Berger and Tartakower, respectively.

See <American Chess Bulletin>, November 1907, pg. 216.

Jul-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: There is a nice group photograph, but one needs be careful to include the caption identifying the attendees:

http://en.chessbase.com/portals/4/f...

In fact, as Winter points out, as the photograph was reproduced, attendees seemed to "disappear"!

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Jul-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Here's the uncaptioned Wiki version:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipe...

The background figures have been "air-brushed" out (or should that be stalinized?)

Jul-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: As for the rule about draws being disallowed before move 45 (without TD permission), the intro states:

<This had the usual effect, with only 40 of the 210 games ending in this manner.>

Maybe an explicit hint, like:

<This had the usual effect, i.e. ??, with only 40 of the 210 games ending in this manner.>

I'm guessing ?? = none, but I might be wrong (?!).

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