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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Moscow Tournament

Leonid Stein11/17(+6 -1 =10)[games]
Aivars Gipslis10/17(+3 -0 =14)[games]
Milko Bobotsov10/17(+3 -0 =14)[games]
Mikhail Tal10/17(+5 -2 =10)[games]
Vasily Smyslov10/17(+4 -1 =12)[games]
Lajos Portisch9.5/17(+6 -4 =7)[games]
David Bronstein9.5/17(+3 -1 =13)[games]
Boris Spassky9.5/17(+4 -2 =11)[games]
Efim Geller8.5/17(+2 -2 =13)[games]
Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian8.5/17(+3 -3 =11)[games]
Miguel Najdorf8.5/17(+2 -2 =13)[games]
Paul Keres8.5/17(+2 -2 =13)[games]
Florin Gheorghiu8/17(+3 -4 =10)[games]
Svetozar Gligoric7.5/17(+2 -4 =11)[games]
Miroslav Filip6/17(+0 -5 =12)[games]
Ludek Pachman6/17(+1 -6 =10)[games]
Wolfgang Uhlmann6/17(+1 -6 =10)[games]
Istvan Bilek6/17(+0 -5 =12)[games]

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Moscow (1967)

Three years after the zonal tournament won by Boris Spassky, another elite international tournament was held in the Soviet capital of Moscow in 1967. Dubbed the 50th Jubilee tournament, eighteen grandmasters were invited to participate in the round robin event. Many of the best grandmasters from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe participated, including the world champion Tigran Petrosian and former world champions Vasily Smyslov and Mikhail Tal. This strong international gathering was won by three-time Soviet champion Leonid Stein with 11/17.

Moscow, Soviet Union (Russia), 21 May - 16 June 1967 (1)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts 1 Stein * 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 11 =2 Smyslov * 1 1 0 1 1 10 =2 Bobotsov * 1 1 1 10 =2 Gipslis * 1 1 1 10 =2 Tal * 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 10 =6 Portisch 0 0 1 * 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 9 =6 Bronstein 0 * 1 1 1 9 =6 Spassky 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 9 =9 Geller 1 1 * 0 0 8 =9 Najdorf 0 1 * 0 1 8 =9 Keres 0 1 0 * 1 8 =9 Petrosian 0 0 1 * 1 0 1 8 13 Gheorghiu 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 * 8 14 Gligoric 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 7 =15 Pachman 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 6 =15 Filip 0 0 0 0 * 0 6 =15 Bilek 0 0 0 0 0 * 6 =15 Uhlmann 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 6

(1) Chess Life 1967, p. 223.

Original Collection : Game Collection: Moscow 1967 by User: suenteus po 147.

 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Smyslov vs Filip  ½-½901967MoscowA14 English
2. I Bilek vs Bronstein  ½-½261967MoscowA06 Reti Opening
3. Spassky vs Pachman 1-0301967MoscowD43 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
4. Gipslis vs Uhlmann 1-0421967MoscowC07 French, Tarrasch
5. M Bobotsov vs Petrosian ½-½201967MoscowD42 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch, 7.Bd3
6. Gheorghiu vs Geller 1-0371967MoscowB76 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
7. Portisch vs Gligoric  ½-½301967MoscowE75 King's Indian, Averbakh, Main line
8. Najdorf vs Keres  ½-½201967MoscowE19 Queen's Indian, Old Main line, 9.Qxc3
9. Stein vs Tal  ½-½241967MoscowC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
10. Geller vs Spassky 1-0411967MoscowD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Bronstein vs Gipslis  ½-½181967MoscowA02 Bird's Opening
12. Pachman vs Najdorf 0-1411967MoscowE55 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System, Bronstein Variation
13. Tal vs Filip 1-0271967MoscowB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
14. Gligoric vs Smyslov  ½-½221967MoscowE54 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System
15. Petrosian vs Gheorghiu 1-0411967MoscowA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
16. Keres vs Portisch 0-1901967MoscowC93 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Smyslov Defense
17. Uhlmann vs M Bobotsov 0-1421967MoscowE75 King's Indian, Averbakh, Main line
18. Stein vs I Bilek 1-0471967MoscowB27 Sicilian
19. Portisch vs Pachman 1-0401967MoscowA05 Reti Opening
20. M Bobotsov vs Bronstein  ½-½221967MoscowA90 Dutch
21. Najdorf vs Geller 1-0681967MoscowE92 King's Indian
22. Smyslov vs Keres  ½-½211967MoscowE02 Catalan, Open, 5.Qa4
23. Filip vs Gligoric  0-1731967MoscowB50 Sicilian
24. Gheorghiu vs Uhlmann  ½-½201967MoscowD86 Grunfeld, Exchange
25. Spassky vs Petrosian  ½-½231967MoscowB36 Sicilian, Accelerated Fianchetto
 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-30-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Didn't Fischer want to be invited to this tournament?
May-02-14  Gottschalk: <Benzol> Because Fischer was supercapitalist and this event celebrated 50 years of the bolshevik revolution.
May-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Yes I suppose it might not have gone down so well if Fischer had won this event but that would have been a tall order given the field.
May-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Fischer would have had fun converting all his roubles into USD afterwards.
May-03-14  Peter Nemenyi: Fischer paid an indirect compliment to the strength of this tournament when he said, after his famous victory over Stein at Sousse 1967, "I beat Stein here and Stein was the winner of the Moscow tournament. I've proved I'm the best" (quoted in Soltis).

Looking at the crosstable, though, it's apparent that the Soviet grandmasters played for draws against each other and let the question of who best thrashed the foreigners decide the event. Stein played six decisive games out of nine against the guests, one out of eight against his fellow Soviets. Four other Soviets only had one decisive game against their compatriots, and two had none.

Apr-06-15  Howard: As far as Fischer's absence, only players from the Soviet Union and Eastern bloc countries, were invited. Western players, in other words, could
not take part.

It should also be noted, by the way, that Petrosian only scored 50%. Considering that he was world champion at the time, he surely should have done better.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <It should also be noted, by the way, that Petrosian only scored 50%. Considering that he was world champion at the time, he surely should have done better.>

Such a lacklustre result was hardly unique to reigning titleholders during the period from Botvinnik to Spassky inclusive; it was only when Karpov and Kasparov ascended to the throne that we witnessed dominance by a champion as was the case, eg, during Alekhine's purple patch of 1930-34.

Apr-06-15  A.T PhoneHome: Perhaps Soviets wanted to draw an ideal picture of Bolshevism, excuse me for the lame pun. Anyways, as you guys can see from the standings, Portisch was the other one with six wins here. He didn't seem to be in such a drawing mood.

As for Leonid Stein, he was just incredible. He won three USSR Championships; in 1963, 1965 and 1966. That amounts to something!

Regarding Soviets drawing against each other, I don't think it meant so much. One could say that Soviets bet awful lot on themselves. For example, Milko Bobotsov, Bulgarian player had 3 wins and 14 draws. He was only 1 point behind Stein; Soviets couldn't afford to lose more than they did here. This woulda-coulda-shoulda talk is to illustrate that Soviets weren't doing themselves any favours with their common draws.

Oct-24-16  RookFile: Fischer at this tournament would have thought that Stein's 6 wins were cute. I see Fischer putting up something like 10 wins and 2 losses with his style of play.
Nov-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Stonehenge: Photo from the fourth round:

https://img.gazeta.ru/files3/389/10...

Nov-10-17  ZonszeinP: Stein! What a player!
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