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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Moscow Tournament

Anatoly Karpov11/17(+5 -0 =12)[games]
Leonid Stein11/17(+5 -0 =12)[games]
Vasily Smyslov10.5/17(+4 -0 =13)[games]
Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov10/17(+3 -0 =14)[games]
Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian10/17(+4 -1 =12)[games]
Mikhail Tal9.5/17(+4 -2 =11)[games]
Boris Spassky9.5/17(+4 -2 =11)[games]
Robert Eugene Byrne9/17(+3 -2 =12)[games]
Vlastimil Hort9/17(+3 -2 =12)[games]
David Bronstein9/17(+4 -3 =10)[games]
Viktor Korchnoi8.5/17(+6 -6 =5)[games]
Florin Gheorghiu7.5/17(+1 -3 =13)[games]
Fridrik Olafsson7.5/17(+3 -5 =9)[games]
Vladimir Savon7.5/17(+2 -4 =11)[games]
Wolfgang Uhlmann6.5/17(+1 -5 =11)[games]
Yuri Balashov6.5/17(+2 -6 =9)[games]
Bruno Parma6/17(+1 -6 =10)[games]
Levente Lengyel4.5/17(+0 -8 =9)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Moscow (1971)

From November 24 - December 18, 1971 the Alekhine Memorial Tournament was held in the Soviet capital of Moscow, on the fifteen year anniversary of the first Alekhine Memorial. Eighteen of the world's strongest grandmasters, including the world champion, were invited to participate in the round robin event. The participants were (in order of ELO): Boris Spassky (2690), Viktor Korchnoi (2670), Tigran Petrosian (2640), Vasily Smyslov (2620), Mikhail Tal (2620), Vlastimil Hort (2605), Leonid Stein (2605), David Bronstein (2590), Yuri Balashov (2570), Fridrik Olafsson (2570), Vladimir Savon (2570), Wolfgang Uhlmann (2570), Vladimir Tukmakov (2565), Anatoli Karpov (2540), Florin Gheorghiu (2530), Bruno Parma (2530), Robert Byrne (2510), and Levente Lengyel (2485). Twenty year old Anatoli Karpov and three time Soviet champion Leonid Stein tied for first place, each with 11/17. Both players overcame a field that included the current world champion as well as three previous world champions and various world challengers of the current and previous generations.

Moscow, Soviet Union (Russia), 24 November - 18 December 1971

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts =1 Karpov * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 11 =1 Stein ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 11 3 Smyslov ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 10½ =4 Tukmakov ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 10 =4 Petrosian ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 10 =6 Tal ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 9½ =6 Spassky ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 9½ =8 Byrne ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 9 =8 Hort 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 9 =8 Bronstein 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 9 11 Korchnoi 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 * 1 ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 8½ =12 Gheorghiu ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 7½ =12 Olafsson ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 * 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 7½ =12 Savon 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ ½ ½ 1 7½ =15 Uhlmann ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * 0 ½ ½ 6v =15 Balashov ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 * 0 ½ 6½ 17 Parma ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 * ½ 6 18 Lengyel 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ * 4½

Original collection: Game Collection: Moscow 1971 by User: suenteus po 147.

 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Robert E Byrne vs Balashov 1-0291971MoscowB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
2. L Lengyel vs Spassky 0-1401971MoscowA92 Dutch
3. Stein vs Bronstein 1-0581971MoscowA30 English, Symmetrical
4. Gheorghiu vs Uhlmann  ½-½271971MoscowC15 French, Winawer
5. F Olafsson vs Tal 1-0221971MoscowA32 English, Symmetrical Variation
6. Smyslov vs V Tukmakov  ½-½891971MoscowE92 King's Indian
7. Savon vs Hort  ½-½291971MoscowB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
8. Parma vs Karpov  ½-½521971MoscowB46 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
9. Korchnoi vs Petrosian 0-1301971MoscowD43 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
10. V Tukmakov vs Savon  ½-½431971MoscowB85 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Classical
11. Spassky vs Gheorghiu  1-0371971MoscowE80 King's Indian, Samisch Variation
12. Karpov vs F Olafsson  ½-½201971MoscowB44 Sicilian
13. Bronstein vs Smyslov ½-½121971MoscowC67 Ruy Lopez
14. Tal vs L Lengyel 1-0591971MoscowA17 English
15. Petrosian vs Balashov 1-0601971MoscowE42 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 c5, 5.Ne2 (Rubinstein)
16. Hort vs Parma  ½-½241971MoscowA01 Nimzovich-Larsen Attack
17. Korchnoi vs Stein ½-½481971MoscowD87 Grunfeld, Exchange
18. Uhlmann vs Robert E Byrne  ½-½411971MoscowE73 King's Indian
19. Parma vs V Tukmakov 0-1371971MoscowB89 Sicilian
20. L Lengyel vs Karpov 0-1411971MoscowE04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
21. Smyslov vs Korchnoi  ½-½291971MoscowA15 English
22. Stein vs Petrosian ½-½221971MoscowC41 Philidor Defense
23. Balashov vs Uhlmann 1-0571971MoscowC09 French, Tarrasch, Open Variation, Main line
24. F Olafsson vs Hort 0-1261971MoscowD83 Grunfeld, Grunfeld Gambit
25. Savon vs Bronstein  ½-½121971MoscowD14 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Exchange Variation
 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-02-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Wow, what a group of talent! Maybe this was during the summer, when Bob was either playing or preparing for Taimonov, Larsen and Petrosian?

It would have been great to see the Fischer effect on this group, especially against the young Karpov.

Dec-03-12  dx9293: Fischer didn't play tournaments in the USSR. How could he, with his paranoid self? Though I do wonder if he was invited. He would have had to decline because of the Candidates matches, as <HeMateMe> mentions, but still.

This is why I think some of the great Soviet players are underrated relative to Fischer: Fischer hardly ever competed in such a superclass field like Moscow 1971. The only such tournaments I can think of that Fischer competed in were the Candidates Tournaments of 1959 and 1962, and the Piatigorsky Cup.

He won none of those tournaments.

Leonid Stein, for example, won three Soviet Championships (infinitely stronger than any of Fischer's US Championships), and Moscow 1967 and Moscow 1971.

Dec-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: ...and yet, Korchnoi, who won the USSR championship 4 times, when it was a stronger event than it is now, made only a dent in Fischer's armour, they were roughly equal with Fischer winning more at key times.

Just splitting hairs of course. They were both giants of their time.

Dec-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: For the record, this tournament was played November 24-December 18; the Fischer-Petrosian match concluded on October 26.

Petrosian did make it to this tournament, so Fischer could have conceivably done so. I don't know the inside story.

Dec-04-12  gauer: Also, some of the notes in the Argentina simuls say that Fischer agreed to play them after the Petrosian match. Seems like Fischer may have needed a vacation (after those 3 matches since the summer) before considering travels from America to Russia to share his World Championship lines that he might've been starting to prepare for.
Dec-05-12  Agent Bouncy: I don't know the facts, but I suspect Fischer was not invited. Notice that none of the top three non-Soviets of the time -- Fischer, Larsen, and Portisch -- played. It's likely the Soviets wanted to be pretty sure one of their own would win.
Dec-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Maybe the three non-Soviets thought it was a long, expensive distance to travel for: 1) no appearance fees, 2)prize money in worthless rubles, 3)lousy hotel food, with no room service, and 4) a guaranteed KGB tag, should one go off on the free day to visit some chess playing dissidents or "refusenik jews".
Dec-28-13  jerseybob: dx9293: The reason many Soviet players are under-valued vis a vis not only Fischer, but against all Western GMs is because their own repressive government refused to let them travel abroad and gain notice and titles. Fischer's avoidance of Soviet tourneys -for whatever reason-has nothing to do with that. You seem to imply that Stein was stronger than Fischer, yet in the tourneys the two contested together,Fischer was much superior, running away with one(Stockholm '62) and leading the other, Sousse'67, before he withdrew. The weakness of U.S. vs. Soviet Championship fields is again not Fischer's fault; you can only beat who's in front of you.
Dec-28-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Even Larsen famously stated thus in an interview: 'Prizes in Soviet tournaments are normally in roubles, which my mortgage company does not accept'.

<jerseybob>, at times <dx9293> has a peculiar view of who is really stronger than whom, a curious blind spot for a player who has professed to be 2100 and should, therefore, understand a thing or three about the game and its players.

Back in Soviet days, even elite players did not receive invitations if they failed to toe the line-ask Korchnoi why he did not play at the first Piatigorsky Cup after having been invited.

You behaved like a good boy and were one of the supernovas, off to this or that foreign tourney outside the Iron Curtain, with all the trimmings. One slip-up, and we need not look beyond one young superstar's temporary fall from grace after this notorious loss: Spassky vs Lombardy, 1960.

Dec-28-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <perfidious>

the latest example was to me yesterday in Ree´s book "My Chess" (well,sometimes Christmas gifts are not the usual suspects:),where he mentioned that Bronstein once had to promise to the USSR autoroties to win a tournament in Holland.

Feb-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Agent Bouncy> In a tournament report by Wolfgang Uhlmann of the GDR chessmagazine <Schach> Jan 1972, p.3, he wrote that <Larsen> and <Fischer> have been invited, but refused to play.
Feb-14-14  dx9293: I don't think Stein was stronger than Fischer, <jerseybob>. My point was the extent to which Fischer's reputation overshadowed all others, who are virtually an afterthought to a lot of fans.

Sure, Fischer dominated Stockholm '62 and Palma de Mallorca '70 (as well as Sousse '67), and won all eight of his US Championships competed in. What's the common denominator? <Mixed-strength fields>; not one superclass field in the bunch. That means something to me. It's why I place <several> world champions ahead of Fischer (I'll get flamed for that, but whatever).

IMHO Reuben Fine's <tournament> results are more impressive than Fischer's. Just sayin'.

Jun-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: Nice plus score by Byrne in such a strong tournament.
Apr-04-16  suenteus po 147: You know it's a tough event when Petrosian scores a loss.
Apr-04-16  ughaibu: USSR Championship (1957) is a bit of a mystery to me. How come Petrosian lost four games?
Apr-05-16  ewan14: Boris showing he was going to be off form in 1972 ?
Apr-05-16  suenteus po 147: <ughaibu> Petrosian was only 27 at the time of that championship. He was also six years away from becoming world champion. I would say he had not yet cultivated his reputation for being immovable.
Apr-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Petrosian took some heat for excessive draws in the 1955 USSR Championship, and might have wanted to show he could keep up with the pace that Tal was setting.
Apr-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <tamar: Petrosian took some heat for excessive draws in the 1955 USSR Championship, and might have wanted to show he could keep up with the pace that Tal was setting.>

Don't have my copy of Tal's autobiography handy, but I think he wrote about this championship that Petrosian wanted to demonstrate that he could play attacking chess. He succeeded, Tal added.

<suenteus> Maybe not immovable, but definitely stolid. He'd been a leading master since 1952. (+7-0=13 at Stockholm, compared to +13-0=7 for Kotov).

Apr-05-16  Howard: One logical reason, in my view, was that Petrosian was simply a bit off form---that's all.

Interestingly enough, the book How to Defend in Chess (by the late Colin Crouch) states that Petrosian didn't really adopt his "Iron Tigran" style of play until about the mid-1950's.

Before that, he was known to take risks, and sometimes he had to pay for it. Starting around 1955 or so, he decided that since "a loss negates a win" (as Crouch put it), why not try to avoid losses at all costs, while throwing in a win here and there.

The rest, as the cliché goes, is history.

Apr-05-16  Howard: Here's something to think about---I just discovered this.

In 1954, Petrosian drew less than half of his games that year, and he lost several...

....but then in 1955, he didn't lose a single game in the Chessgames database ! Not only that, he drew more than half his games that year.

Then, in 1956, he once again drew over half his total games, while losing only a handful.

Looks like 1955 was probably when Iron Tigran started refining his style of play !

Apr-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < Howard: One logical reason, in my view, was that Petrosian was simply a bit off form---that's all. Interestingly enough, the book How to Defend in Chess (by the late Colin Crouch) states that Petrosian didn't really adopt his "Iron Tigran" style of play until about the mid-1950's.

Before that, he was known to take risks, and sometimes he had to pay for it. Starting around 1955 or so, he decided that since "a loss negates a win" (as Crouch put it), why not try to avoid losses at all costs, while throwing in a win here and there.

The rest, as the cliché goes, is history.>

Dunno about that. He had a pretty strong reputation as a defensive/positional player early on if Bronstein's and Najdorf's books on the 1953 Candidates are anything to go by. He lost four games (out of 28) there, but it wasn't because of risk taking. He just wasn't quite as good as he later became.

Apr-05-16  Howard: "Dunno about" your point. Bear in mind that at Zurich, 1953 Petrosian was way off form at the beginning. He not only drew his first four games, but he then lost his next two games.

In other words, he was -2 after just six rounds. THEN, he started to find his form, and he did much, much better for the rest of the tournament...

....notwithstanding the fact that he darn well should have lost to Smyslov in the second half of the event, in a very well-known game !

Apr-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < Howard: "Dunno about" your point. Bear in mind that at Zurich, 1953 Petrosian was way off form at the beginning. He not only drew his first four games, but he then lost his next two games. In other words, he was -2 after just six rounds. THEN, he started to find his form, and he did much, much better for the rest of the tournament...

....notwithstanding the fact that he darn well should have lost to Smyslov in the second half of the event, in a very well-known game !>

Well, I'm not going to fight with anyone about whether Petrosian became a defensive/positional player in 1952 or 1955. But I'm not just talking about how he played, but how Najdorf and Bronstein described him.

Apr-06-16  Howard: I'll take your word for it---besides, I have both of those books. Bronstein's, in particular, I've always loved--but then Najdorf's does fill in a few gaps that Bronstein's book left open.
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