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🏆 USSR Championship (1940)

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
The 12th Soviet Chess Championship was played in the capital city of Moscow from September 5 to October 3, 1940. Twenty of the Soviet Union's strongest masters competed in the round robin event, six of whom qualified from the semi-final tournament in Kiev earlier in the year: Eduard Gerstenfeld, Mark Stolberg, Igor Bondarevsky, Iosif Rudakovsky, Alexander Konstantinopolsky and Peter Dubinin. The remaining invitations went to the elite of Soviet chess (new and old), including Mikhail Botvinnik, Vasily Smyslo ... [more]

Player: Viacheslav Ragozin

 page 1 of 1; 19 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Ragozin vs V Makogonov  0-1451940USSR ChampionshipA02 Bird's Opening
2. Keres vs Ragozin  1-0471940USSR ChampionshipC79 Ruy Lopez, Steinitz Defense Deferred
3. Ragozin vs Kotov  1-0521940USSR ChampionshipE19 Queen's Indian, Old Main line, 9.Qxc3
4. Konstantinopolsky vs Ragozin 0-1401940USSR ChampionshipA04 Reti Opening
5. Ragozin vs V Mikenas  ½-½231940USSR ChampionshipD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
6. E Gerstenfeld vs Ragozin  ½-½411940USSR ChampionshipA28 English
7. Ragozin vs Lilienthal  ½-½401940USSR ChampionshipC99 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin, 12...cd
8. Botvinnik vs Ragozin ½-½631940USSR ChampionshipE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
9. Ragozin vs I Rudakovsky  1-0321940USSR ChampionshipE07 Catalan, Closed
10. Bondarevsky vs Ragozin 0-1201940USSR ChampionshipC55 Two Knights Defense
11. Ragozin vs Boleslavsky  0-1531940USSR ChampionshipA02 Bird's Opening
12. Smyslov vs Ragozin 1-0321940USSR ChampionshipC77 Ruy Lopez
13. Ragozin vs Levenfish  ½-½411940USSR ChampionshipD26 Queen's Gambit Accepted
14. P Dubinin vs Ragozin  1-0511940USSR ChampionshipC77 Ruy Lopez
15. Ragozin vs V Petrov  ½-½661940USSR ChampionshipC87 Ruy Lopez
16. M Stolberg vs Ragozin  1-0571940USSR ChampionshipE51 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
17. Ragozin vs Lisitsin  1-0431940USSR ChampionshipE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
18. Ragozin vs Panov 0-1251940USSR ChampionshipB80 Sicilian, Scheveningen
19. Veresov vs Ragozin  ½-½421940USSR ChampionshipE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
 page 1 of 1; 19 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Ragozin wins | Ragozin loses  

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-28-12  Blunderdome: Only three draws in nineteen games for Kotov.
Dec-29-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Due to the Soviet annexation of the Baltic states, as well as the partitioning of Poland with Germany, Keres, Petrov, Mikenas and Gerstenfeld were now considered Soviet "citizens", and thus were eligible to compete.
Jan-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nosnibor: There appears to be something wrong with the table at the top.Bondarevsky is credited with 1/2 point more than Lilienthal although it is well known that they both tied for first place on 13.5 points each.This appears to be due by showing a win over Konstantinopolsky by Bondarevsky when the historical record clearly indicates that this game was drawn.Methinks that the game shown in the database was from another event.It does of course also miscalculates Konstantinopolsk`s final score.
Jan-02-13  Kangaroo: Here is the game that should have been included!

<Bondarevsky vs Konstantinopolsky, 1940>

to replace

<Bondarevsky vs Konstantinopolsky, 1940> which might have been played in the semi-final or other tournament!

Jan-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Nosnibor>: I think I see what happened. The database has two Bondarevsky - Konstatninopolsky games in the database which claim to be from the 1940 Championship.

Bondarevsky vs Konstantinopolsky, 1940 (1-0), which was added to the original collection, was actually from the Semi-Final in Kiev. Bondarevsky vs Konstantinopolsky, 1940 (1/2-1/2) is the correct game.

I'll institute repairs immediately. Thanks for spotting that.

May-12-13  wordfunph: "My favorite game was my win against Botvinnik in the Soviet Championship of 1940. It was stronger than any grandmaster tournament, the 20 strongest chess players were in it, including Botvinnik, Smyslov and Keres. I was undefeated in first place. I've won lots of tournaments, but this was the best."

- Andre Lilienthal

Source: Curse of Kirsan by Sarah Hurst

Jan-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  WCC Editing Project:

<Peter Romanovsky> tells the gripping story of Vasily Smyslov in this tournament:

<"Smyslov began the tournament brilliantly and after fourteen rounds, five rounds before the end, having won five games in succession, he headed the table with 10 1/2 points without the loss of a game. Bondarevsky, playing very well, had 10 points, while Lilienthal and Botvinnik had 9 1/2 each. It seemed that first place and <<<the title of grandmaster was almost assured>>> to Smyslov, however in the fifteenth round he suffered his one and only loss in the tournament at the hands of Makogonov. In the four remaining rounds he conceded three draws, and with 13 points finished behind Bondarevsky and Lilienthal, who each had 13 1/2. Keres, Botvinnik, and Boleslavsky were below Symslov. by this success Smyslov showed himself to be of grandmaster strength.">

-P.A. Romanovsky, "Vassily Vassilievitch Smyslov."

Published in
Vasily Smyslov, "My Best Games of Chess (1935-1957)" P.H. Clarke ed., transl. (Routledge and Kegan Paul 1958), pp. xi-xxvii (First published as "Izbrannie partii" in Russian in 1952)

#####################

When <Smyslov> again managed 3d place in the USSR Absolute Championship (1941), on the strength of both 3d place efforts he was indeed awarded the title of Soviet Grandmaster.

Of further interest, <Makogonov>, the only player to defeat <Smyslov> in this event, later went on to serve as his second in his World Chess championship matches against <Botvinnik> in 1954 and 1957.

<Smyslov> acknowledges the assistance of <Makogonov>:

<"During the match against Botvinnik, Makogonov was one of my coaches <<<And the fact that I became world champion is due in large part to his work.>>> He expounded his ideas clearly and persuasively. I remember his excellent analysis, which he summed up with the help of diagrams. This method is best to fix in memory the most important opening positions.">

(translation by Google. I adjusted some of the punctuation, diction and phrasing for clearer English idiom and sense)

-http://sultanov.azeriland.com/chess...

Jan-26-14  AsosLight: Staggering roster.
Nov-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: Yes the roster is mighty impressive. It probably was the strongest Soviet Championship held until at this point in time, with two future World Champions and an Almost World Champion, and a host of very strong veterans and rising stars.

Take a look at the openings in this tournament. Sicilians (including the Scheveningen and the Dragon), KIDs, Grunfelds, QIDs, Catalans, Nimzo-Indians, English. This tournament's openings looks indistinguishable from one played yesterday.

I have found out that kibitzers usually associate the term 'modern' with these openings. In fact, these openings were already played by 1930s masters. Post WW2, it's their frequency and the attention given to them that has changed, increased. The only opening pawn structure I don't see pre WW2 is the Hedgehog.

At this point in time, Botvinnik was still not clearly superior to Keres. The younger Keres had placed ahead of him in AVRO 1938, and again placed ahead of him in this tournament. So did a rising youthful Smyslov. Lilienthal and Bondarevsky won. Botvinnik was the unofficial face of Soviet Chess. The authorities probably were not exactly ecstatic over the results. The 1941 Soviet tournament was most probably held in order to allow Botvinnik the chance to rectify the 'wrong' results in this one.

From these perspectives, this tournament is an important one in chess history.

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