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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Groningen Tournament

Mikhail Botvinnik14.5/19(+13 -3 =3)[games]
Max Euwe14/19(+11 -2 =6)[games]
Vasily Smyslov12.5/19(+7 -1 =11)[games]
Miguel Najdorf11.5/19(+6 -2 =11)[games]
Laszlo Szabo11.5/19(+9 -5 =5)[games]
Isaac Boleslavsky11/19(+8 -5 =6)[games]
Salomon Flohr11/19(+4 -1 =14)[games]
Erik Ruben Lundin10.5/19(+7 -5 =7)[games]
Gosta Stoltz10.5/19(+6 -4 =9)[games]
Arnold Denker9.5/19(+5 -5 =9)[games]
Alexander Kotov9.5/19(+6 -6 =7)[games]
Savielly Tartakower9.5/19(+3 -3 =13)[games]
Cenek Kottnauer9/19(+7 -8 =4)[games]
Daniel Abraham Yanofsky8.5/19(+4 -6 =9)[games]
Ossip Bernstein7/19(+2 -7 =10)[games]
Carlos Enrique Guimard7/19(+3 -8 =8)[games]
Milan Vidmar6.5/19(+1 -7 =11)[games]
Herman Steiner6/19(+2 -9 =8)[games]
Alberic O'Kelly de Galway5.5/19(+3 -11 =5)[games]
Martin Christoffel5/19(+3 -12 =4)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Groningen (1946)

The tournament held at Groningen, Netherlands 13 Aug-7 Sept 1946, was a watershed in chess history. Not only was it the first major international tournament after World War II, it marked the first time the Soviet Union sent a team of players to a foreign event. Their results confirmed the growing recognition of the great strength of Soviet players: Smyslov finished third, Boleslavsky and Flohr tied for sixth; though Kotov finished out of the running, he defeated both of the top finishers.

These were Mikhail Botvinnik and Max Euwe, who were in a close race to the end. Botvinnik had a lead much of the way, but successive losses to Kotov and Yanofsky in rounds 14-15 let Euwe go ahead by a point. However, Euwe then drew three in a row while Botvinnik won three in a row to pull ahead by a half-point going into the last round.

And nerves took over. Botvinnik was outplayed by Najdorf, but Euwe blundered and lost a drawn position against Kotov leaving the final standings unchanged. For Botvinnik, it was his first outright victory outside the Soviet Union, on his road to the World Championship; for Euwe, it was his last great international success.

Groningen, Netherlands, 13 August - 7 September 1946

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 Botvinnik * 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.5 2 Euwe * 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.0 3 Smyslov 0 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 12.5 4 Najdorf 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 11.5 5 Szabo 0 0 0 * 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11.5 6 Boleslavsky 0 0 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11.0 7 Flohr * 0 1 1 1 1 11.0 8 Lundin 0 1 1 0 * 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 10.5 9 Stoltz 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 10.5 10 Denker 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 0 1 1 1 9.5 11 Kotov 1 1 0 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 0 1 0 9.5 12 Tartakower 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 9.5 13 Kottnauer 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 * 1 1 0 0 1 9.0 14 Yanofsky 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 8.5 15 Bernstein 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 * 0 0 7.0 16 Guimard 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 1 7.0 17 Vidmar 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 * 0 6.5 18 Steiner 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 6.0 19 O'Kelly 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 * 5.5 20 Christoffel 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 * 5.0

Thanks to <suenteus po 147> and <nescio> for round-by-round pairings and the crosstable. See also Wikipedia article: Groningen 1946 chess tournament.

Original collection: Game Collection: Groningen 1946, by User: number 23 Nber.

 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 190  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Euwe vs Yanofsky 1-0461946GroningenE40 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
2. Denker vs Najdorf ½-½421946GroningenE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
3. O'Kelly vs M Christoffel 1-0411946GroningenB81 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack
4. Boleslavsky vs Guimard  ½-½411946GroningenC14 French, Classical
5. Stoltz vs Kotov ½-½411946GroningenD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
6. O Bernstein vs C Kottnauer 0-1551946GroningenD46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
7. Botvinnik vs Szabo 1-0311946GroningenD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
8. Smyslov vs Vidmar 1-0431946GroningenC64 Ruy Lopez, Classical
9. Flohr vs Tartakower ½-½551946GroningenE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
10. H Steiner vs E R Lundin  0-1381946GroningenD02 Queen's Pawn Game
11. M Christoffel vs O Bernstein  1-0391946GroningenC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
12. C Kottnauer vs Euwe 0-1311946GroningenA28 English
13. Kotov vs Flohr 1-0401946GroningenD96 Grunfeld, Russian Variation
14. E R Lundin vs Botvinnik 0-1521946GroningenE18 Queen's Indian, Old Main line, 7.Nc3
15. Najdorf vs Boleslavsky 1-0371946GroningenA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
16. Smyslov vs H Steiner 1-0341946GroningenA51 Budapest Gambit
17. Guimard vs O'Kelly ½-½401946GroningenD12 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
18. Yanofsky vs Stoltz  ½-½411946GroningenB32 Sicilian
19. Vidmar vs Tartakower 0-1451946GroningenA95 Dutch, Stonewall
20. Szabo vs Denker 0-1391946GroningenE19 Queen's Indian, Old Main line, 9.Qxc3
21. Euwe vs M Christoffel 1-0341946GroningenD13 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Exchange Variation
22. Denker vs E R Lundin  1-0421946GroningenD22 Queen's Gambit Accepted
23. Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1-0501946GroningenD98 Grunfeld, Russian
24. O Bernstein vs Guimard  ½-½601946GroningenC01 French, Exchange
25. Flohr vs Yanofsky 1-0521946GroningenD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 190  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-20-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Blessed be the <cg librarian> indeed. The two missing games are now part of the collection.

:)

Aug-30-13  nescio: I think it should be mentoned that the organizers of this tournament had a luxury problem before it started. After everyone had arrived (which was by no means a certainty a year after the second world war) it turned out there were 21 participants instead of 20.

They could have extended the schedule with 2 extra rounds, even make it a 22-player tournament, for the head of the Soviet delegation was Gavriil Veresov, champion of Belarus. Unfortunately that was impossible, if I remember correctly because the Americans and the Soviets had to leave on schedule to arrive in time for a USSR-USA match.

To ask a foreigner to withdraw was out of the question, and Lodewijk Prins didn't want to let go this chance to play against the world's best. When Euwe declared that he was ready to withdraw, the Soviets, in particular Botvinnik and Veresov, convinced Prins to withdraw by promising him an invitation to a tournament in Moscow in the near future.

Needless to say, that invitation has still to come.

Feb-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Despite finishing only 11th, Kotov was the only player to defeat both the 1st and 2nd place finishers (Botvinnik and Euwe).
Apr-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <GrahamClayton> Shades of St Petersburg (1909), where Dus-Chotimirsky finished 13th with a -2 result, but beat the joint winners Lasker and Rubinstein. Those two wins were 40% of his five wins in the tournament! Lasker and Rubinstein mauled the field, each scoring 14.5/18. The only other game either lost was Lasker's loss to Rubinstein.
Apr-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Kotov was a lot stronger player than Dus-Chotimirsky
Apr-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <plang> It's true, he did win the Stockholm Interzonal (1952) by 3.5 points, then a record.
Apr-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Er, make that three points. Counting is FUN-damental.
Apr-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Pity that fine result availed him naught, come to Zurich Candidates (1953), where Kotov inflicted the only defeat upon Smyslov, the winner, though himself an also-ran.
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