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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Vienna Tournament

Mikhail Chigorin13/18(+12 -4 =2)[view games]
Frank James Marshall11.5/18(+10 -5 =3)[view games]
Georg Marco11/18(+9 -5 =4)[view games]
Harry Nelson Pillsbury10/18(+6 -4 =8)[view games]
Geza Maroczy9/18(+5 -5 =8)[view games]
Richard Teichmann9/18(+8 -8 =2)[view games]
Jacques Mieses9/18(+8 -8 =2)[view games]
Rudolf Swiderski8.5/18(+6 -7 =5)[view games]
Carl Schlechter7/18(+5 -9 =4)[view games]
Isidor Gunsberg2/18(+1 -15 =2)[view games]
*

Chessgames.com Historical Chess Event
Vienna (1903)

1.Tschigorin XX 10 1= =1 01 10 11 10 11 11 13 2.Marshall 01 XX 00 11 11 11 00 1= == 11 11.5 3.Marco 0= 11 XX =0 01 01 =1 =1 10 11 11 4.Pillsbury =0 00 d1 XX == 1= =0 1= 1= 11 10 5.Marcozy 10 00 10 == XX =1 01 == =1 == 9 6.Mieses 01 00 10 0= =0 XX 11 11 01 10 9 7.Teichmann 00 11 =0 =1 10 00 XX 01 10 11 9 8.Swiderski 01 0= =0 0= == 00 10 XX 11 11 8.5 9.Schlechter 00 == 01 0= =0 10 01 00 XX 11 7 10.Gunsberg 00 00 00 00 == 01 00 00 00 XX 2

Chigorin - Teichmann, round 18, was a forfeit win for Chigorin.

"The once-lively enthusiasm for romantic gambit play had virtually disappeared by the end of the 19th century. To revive the flagging interest, the Vienna Chess Club sponsored a King’s Gambit tournament in which the moves 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 were prescribed.

An immediate excitement arose among the various European chess bodies, which would welcome the reappearance of such heroic debuts as the Salvio, Allgaier, Kieseritzky and Muzio Gambits. The idea found a positive echo in tsarist Russia where chess associations in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Kiev sent telegrams of enthusiastic support to their innovative Viennese colleagues.

With the generous financial support of Albert Rothschild and Leopold Trebitsch, the Vienna Chess Club invited ten masters from the United States, Germany, England, Austria, Hungary and Russia to match skills in a double-round event featuring a 8,000-kroner prize purse.

Once the tournament was underway, the masters who favored positional play found themselves at the mercy of the aggressive gambiteers. Such prominent figures as Schlechter, Maroczy and Teichmann finished outside the prize list. The wild combinational storms unleashed by the hoary King’s Gambit proved too formidable for Schlechter, who was forced to give up nine of his 18 games! Maroczy’s five losses, exceeded by Teichmann’s eight, confirmed the fact that one must be well prepared analytically (and psychologically!) to do battle with adroit gamblers like Tschigorin and Marshall.

Tschigorin, acclaimed as “King of the Gambiteers,” outstripped the field with 12 wins, 4 losses and 2 draws to win first prize (1,893.75 kroner). The runner-up spot and 1,380 kroner went to a kindred spirit, Marshall (+10-5=3), who was not displeased with his showing:

<…coming second to Tschigorin was no disgrace, for the old Russian had made a lifelong study of the King’s Gambit and had a deeper knowledge of this intricate opening than has ever been possessed by any other man.” – Marshall in <MY FIFTY YEARS OF CHESS.>

The action-loving Marshall, who had been in a “slump” after his initial success at Paris 1900, dropped his opening game to Marco but then proceeded to out-gambit Maroczy (in 16 moves), Pillsbury, Swiderski, Gunsberg and Mieses to take the lead after six rounds. Successive losses, however, to Tschigorin (Salvio Gambit) and Teichmann in the 7th and 8th rounds enabled the swarthy Russian champion to inherit the top place, an advantage he resolutely forged into a two-point lead by the end of the 15th round.

The 16th round saw Marshall gain his revenge against Tschigorin on the Black side of a Bishop Gambit – a game admired by Marco “as one of Marshall’s best… a classic from A to Z.” In the next round, Mieses administered a second shock to the age’s foremost gambiteer – but Tschigorin was unexpectedly presented with a “gift point” in the final 18th round when the health-plagued Teichmann failed to appear in the playing hall. The <Wiener Schachzeitung> dutifully pointed out that had Tschigorin lost this game (he won their nineteenth round encounter), and Marshall won from Schlechter, a play-off between these two fighting masters would have crowned Vienna’s valiant attempt to bring about a renaissance of the King’s Gambit.

In third place came Marco (+9-5=4), who skillfully combined play with his journalistic duties. He overcame a dismal start (2.5 in the first six rounds) to delight the Viennese onlookers with a stirring finish of 8.5 out of 12 points. Included in his point production were two triumphs over Marshall, 1.5 points against Teichmann and a win apiece from Maroczy and Schlechter.

Fourth prize in the gambit feast fell to Pillsbury who, in what was to be his last European tournament, “gave little indication that his career was approaching its end.” <PILLSBURY’S CHESS CAREER> Two losses to fellow Yankee, Marshall, compromised Pillsbury’s chance for a higher placing" – Goldman in <CARL SCHLECHTER – Life and Times of the Austrian Chess Wizard>.

Original collection: Game Collection: 1903 Vienna, by User: TheFocus

 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 88  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Schlechter vs Chigorin  0-128 1903 ViennaC37 King's Gambit Accepted
2. Maroczy vs Gunsberg  ½-½25 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
3. G Marco vs Marshall 1-023 1903 ViennaC30 King's Gambit Declined
4. Pillsbury vs Swiderski 1-014 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
5. Teichmann vs Mieses 0-128 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
6. Gunsberg vs Pillsbury 0-124 1903 ViennaC36 King's Gambit Accepted, Abbazia Defense
7. Mieses vs Swiderski 1-021 1903 ViennaC30 King's Gambit Declined
8. Teichmann vs Schlechter 1-072 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
9. Marshall vs Maroczy 1-021 1903 ViennaC37 King's Gambit Accepted
10. Chigorin vs G Marco 1-079 1903 ViennaC34 King's Gambit Accepted
11. G Marco vs Teichmann ½-½26 1903 ViennaC30 King's Gambit Declined
12. Swiderski vs Gunsberg  1-032 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
13. Maroczy vs Chigorin 1-024 1903 ViennaC37 King's Gambit Accepted
14. Schlechter vs Mieses 1-021 1903 ViennaC34 King's Gambit Accepted
15. Pillsbury vs Marshall 0-143 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
16. Chigorin vs Pillsbury ½-½46 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
17. Teichmann vs Maroczy 1-033 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
18. Schlechter vs G Marco  0-139 1903 ViennaC37 King's Gambit Accepted
19. Marshall vs Swiderski  1-032 1903 ViennaC34 King's Gambit Accepted
20. Mieses vs Gunsberg  1-018 1903 ViennaC38 King's Gambit Accepted
21. Pillsbury vs Teichmann  ½-½37 1903 ViennaC34 King's Gambit Accepted
22. G Marco vs Mieses  0-127 1903 ViennaC34 King's Gambit Accepted
23. Maroczy vs Schlechter  ½-½76 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
24. Gunsberg vs Marshall 0-136 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
25. Swiderski vs Chigorin  0-129 1903 ViennaC33 King's Gambit Accepted
 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 88  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
May-02-14  JimNorCal: I note that the strong master Gunsberg could only pull in a single point.
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