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🏆 Curacao Candidates (1962)

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Soon after the ... [more]

Player: Miroslav Filip

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 27  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Keres vs Filip ½-½371962Curacao CandidatesB49 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
2. Filip vs Benko 1-0281962Curacao CandidatesE60 King's Indian Defense
3. Fischer vs Filip 1-0661962Curacao CandidatesC98 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
4. Geller vs Filip ½-½131962Curacao CandidatesB42 Sicilian, Kan
5. Filip vs Tal 0-1341962Curacao CandidatesA49 King's Indian, Fianchetto without c4
6. Korchnoi vs Filip 1-01011962Curacao CandidatesD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
7. Filip vs Petrosian  ½-½141962Curacao CandidatesE60 King's Indian Defense
8. Filip vs Keres 0-1371962Curacao CandidatesD29 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
9. Benko vs Filip 1-0381962Curacao CandidatesD74 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.cd Nxd5, 7.O-O
10. Filip vs Fischer ½-½441962Curacao CandidatesE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
11. Filip vs Geller 0-1291962Curacao CandidatesA10 English
12. Tal vs Filip 0-1391962Curacao CandidatesB43 Sicilian, Kan, 5.Nc3
13. Filip vs Korchnoi  0-1531962Curacao CandidatesE58 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line with 8...Bxc3
14. Petrosian vs Filip 1-0281962Curacao CandidatesD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
15. Keres vs Filip 1-0281962Curacao CandidatesB42 Sicilian, Kan
16. Filip vs Benko 0-1411962Curacao CandidatesE83 King's Indian, Samisch
17. Fischer vs Filip 1-0421962Curacao CandidatesC76 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense, Fianchetto Variation
18. Geller vs Filip 1-0221962Curacao CandidatesB84 Sicilian, Scheveningen
19. Filip vs Tal  ½-½331962Curacao CandidatesE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
20. Korchnoi vs Filip 1-0461962Curacao CandidatesA22 English
21. Filip vs Petrosian 0-1501962Curacao CandidatesB08 Pirc, Classical
22. Filip vs Keres  ½-½381962Curacao CandidatesE40 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
23. Benko vs Filip ½-½331962Curacao CandidatesE54 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System
24. Filip vs Fischer ½-½231962Curacao CandidatesD59 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower
25. Filip vs Geller ½-½561962Curacao CandidatesE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 27  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Filip wins | Filip loses  


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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-09-18  WorstPlayerEver: <AylerKupp>

We are not talking about a picture, we are talking about the other Russians, I suppose.

I simply assume it was propaganda. The Russians could not read English anyhow at that time.

Jul-13-18  Howard: Regarding Benko's quotation from the July, 1975 CL&R, perhaps one should add another quotation of his from a 1981 issue of CL.

Benko stated that when Fischer became WC, "I was certainly pleased that Fischer justified my decision (to let him have my interzonal spot). But after that..."

Jul-13-18  ughaibu: If you'd been a competitor in the US zonal who'd finished below Benko, would you have turned down a candidates place? I wouldn't have, I can't imagine why anyone would, never mind the whole bunch.
Jul-13-18  ughaibu: Of course that should be a place in the interzonal, with the chance of a place in the candidates.
Jul-13-18  Howard: If you truly believed in your heart that you hardly had a chance in hell of making the Candidates--should you end up in the interzonal--you, frankly, probably would be better off ceding that spot to someone like Fischer.

If Fischer was to make the Candidates, that in itself would probably give American chess a much-needed boost. And if he should go on to the WC...well, what more needs to be said ?

Jul-13-18  ughaibu: <If you truly believed in your heart that you hardly had a chance in hell of making the Candidates--should you end up in the interzonal>

What kind of chess player believes that?

Jul-15-18  Howard: You're talking to one of them!
Jul-15-18  ughaibu: Howard: Do you truly believe from the depths of your heart that you have no chance to win any tournament you take part in?
Jul-15-18  Howard: Unfortunately, yes ! My record in the last few Chicago Open's, as well as the last few World Open's, reflects that very nicely.

I'm so rusty as far as chess, it ain't funny !

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Howard> The only questionable factor is whether Benko (who, incidentally, turns 90 in only about a week) gave up his spot out of the goodness of his heart, or whether he was financially "compensated".>

Oh, Benko was "compensated" all right, he admitted it. The only question is, what was he "compensated" for? In "Bobby Fischer goes to War" Edmonds and Eidinow said that Benko was paid $ 2,000 for giving up his place to Fischer in the 1970 Palma de Majorca Interzonal, and others have said the same thing. Yasser Seirawan in his book "Chess Rules: (see https://en.chessbase.com/post/congr...) says :

"In light of this [stepping aside], we contacted Benko to clarify the matter. His explanation makes it easy to see how the story became convoluted with the passage of time.

Benko says that he went to Palma de Mallorca in 1970 despite having agreed to yield his spot in the Interzonal to Fischer just in case Fischer should change his mind and decide not to play after all. His compatriots Samuel Reshevsky and William Addison were each paid $2,000 for their participation in the Interzonal (Fischer was paid more), and the USCF Executive Director Ed Edmondson offered Benko the same. Benko declined, but agreed to stay and serve as a second to Reshevsky and Addison. It was for this service that he was paid $2,000.

'That was my regular fee ($2,000) anyhow to be second of someone', he writes via email."

And this was Pal Benko's account, quoted by <tamar>: Pal Benko (kibitz #216)

So it seems that $ 2,000 was the appearance fee for participating in the 1970 Palma de Majorca Interzonal. If that's the case then I don't think that it would have been wrong for Benko to receive $ 2,000 for a spot that he <earned> in order to allow Fischer to play in his place instead. And, given that Spassky received $ 1,400 for winning his 1969 match for the WCC against Petrosian, being paid $ 2,000 for acting as a <second> at an Interzonal tournament seems hard to believe, even though Fischer won $ 2,500 for winning the 1966 US Chess Championship.

But perhaps Benko thought that it would look better to say that he was being paid $ 2,000 for services rendered rather than for (justifiably, I think) giving up his place in the 1970 Interzonal. But, if he knew that he was going to be paid $ 2,000 anyway because that's what a US participant in the 1970 Interzonal was going to be paid, then it wouldn't have been much of a "sacrifice" to give up his place to Fischer because "as one of the world's strongest players he should have the right to participate in that critical Interzonal." And it would not be too much of a "gratitude" to show the USCF because it "had always treated me well."

So who knows what he was really paid the $ 2,000 for? Regardless of the reason, I think that he was entitled to it.

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<offramp> You are right. A 1970-1972 cycle without Fischer would have been a farce, a non-event. The Benko solution was the perfect solution.>

Well, if the 1970-1972 cycle without Fischer would have been a farce (and I agree), Fischer would have had no one else but himself to blame.

<The Benko solution was the perfect solution>

I don't think so. Although the end result was the same, the perfect solution would have been as I indicated in Robert James Fischer (kibitz #56723) (although, of course, I'm biased), to have the USCF anticipate that Fischer would not participate in the Interzonal-qualifying 1969 US Championship (as he said he wouldn't unless it was extended to 22 games) and change the Interzonal qualification rules (which every national chess federation had the right to do) to indicate that the 3 US qualifiers for the 1970 Interzonal would be the players that finished in the top 2 places in the 1969 US Chess Championship plus an at large entry to be named by the USCF. After all, this is currently done for the Candidates Tournament when the organizers select an at large entry. Then Reshevsky and Addison would have qualified by virtue of finishing 1-2 and the USCF could have nominated Fischer as the at large entry.

No mess, no fuzz, no controversy, and everything would have been perfectly legal. Alas, the USCF didn't ask me. :-)

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Worst Player Ever> We are not talking about a picture, we are talking about the other Russians, I suppose.>

No, that's not what <sudoplatov> said in the post that I was responding to (Curacao Candidates (1962) (kibitz #143)), that Fischer was the only player that visited Tal in the hospital. He didn't say anything about whether the players were Russians (i.e. Soviets, since Petrosian was Armenian and Keres was Estonian, neither of them Russian) and neither Benko nor Miroslav Filip were Russian/Soviet either. So the picture is <possible> evidence that Benko also visited Fischer in the hospital, although he claimed that he didn't, and he apparently said that "it is said that no one but Fischer visited Tal in the hospital." But how would Benko really know whether anyone besides Fischer visited Tal in the hospital?

As I also said in my post above "At any rate, I don't think that it's that important. It is clear that Fischer visited Tal in the hospital in Curacao and that was a nice and thoughtful thing for Fischer to do." And if anyone else besides Fischer visited Tal in the hospital, that would have been a nice thing and thoughtful thing for them to do also.

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<ughaibu> If you'd been a competitor in the US zonal who'd finished below Benko, would you have turned down a candidates place? I wouldn't have, I can't imagine why anyone would, never mind the whole bunch.>

I wouldn't have either as I said in World Cup (2017) (kibitz #3200), but those were different times and different people. I think that none of them would have argued that of all the US players that Fischer was the only who stood the best chance to qualify for the Candidates Tournament and win it. And some competitors would likely have voluntarily given up their spot, most likely Lombardy (who finished 4th), Evans (who finished 6th), and Mednis (who finished 7th), all good friends of Fischer, at least at the time. And who knows what pressure, subtle or otherwise, was put on the other 1969 US Chess Championship participants?

It would have been "interesting" if Reshevsky, who was definitely <not> a good friend of Fischer, had finished lower than 3rd in the 1969 US Chess Championship. Would he have given up his spot to Fisher, voluntarily or otherwise? I don't think so.

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Howard> If you truly believed in your heart that you hardly had a chance in hell of making the Candidates--should you end up in the interzonal--you, frankly, probably would be better off ceding that spot to someone like Fischer.>

How would I or anyone else have been better off? Would the USCF have "compensated" me? Would Fischer have even bothered to thank me or anyone else? According to Benko in https://en.chessbase.com/post/congr..., Fischer never thanked him for giving up his spot as the 3rd place finisher in the 1969 US Championship. If he didn't thank Benko, why would he thank me or anyone else who finished lower than 3rd?

< If Fischer was to make the Candidates, that in itself would probably give American chess a much-needed boost. And if he should go on to the WC...well, what more needs to be said ?>

That I don't recall Fischer ever saying anything about caring for giving American chess a boost or acting accordingly. Do you? Did Fischer decide to play his 1975 with Karpov because it would "give American chess a much-needed boost"? When did Fischer ever do anything altruistically?

Jul-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: People saying they would not have given up their spot in the Interzonal after Benko suggested he gave up his place don't quite get it.

If any of those who finished below Benko disagreed then the deal was off. Benko makes it very clear he offered his place to Bobby Fischer, no one else.

" The idea for me to step down and give Fischer my place was my own; it was made voluntarily and without pressure from anyone.

I felt that as one of the world's strongest players he should have the right to participate in that critical Interzonal. The U.S. Chess Federation had always treated me well; by my action I hoped to show my gratitude. "

Pal Benko 1974.

http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp...

---

The Russian press played a major role in letting this Benko situation arise.

Benko writing in the March 1970 Chess Life and Review (page 130) about his prep for this tournament says he won his last round game, thus obtaining 3rd place, Robert E Byrne vs Benko, 1969 due to him studying Russian analysis from a game played a few months earlier. Gufeld vs Savon, 1969

See Robert E Byrne vs Benko, 1969 (kibitz #1)

Meanwhile...One tournament later...The Soviets no doubt impressed with this show gratitude from Benko towards his adopted country did an unofficial 'Benko!'

Taimanov vs Matulovic, 1970 (kibitz #121)

Jul-16-18  SpiritedReposte: Benko knew Fischer was gonna give the russians that work. They didn't want that smoke with yer boi.
Jul-16-18  Howard: First, let me state that I appreciate the honest and tactful feedback to my comments. Some of the sarcastic/sniping "rebuttals" that people post, get on my nerves.

I guess my reasoning had I been a top-three finisher in '69, would be that if I hardly "had a chance in hell" (to quote myself) of making the Candidates, why NOT cede my place to Fischer? Think of all the favorable publicity I'd get! (If you don't believe that, ask Benko !) Not only that, I'd unquestionably be doing American chess a big favor especially if Fischer by some chance went on to become WC.

As I see it, probably the only concrete thing I'd be giving up would be a fairly modest amount of prize money. A fairly small price for giving Fischer a real shot at the WC.

I'm not saying that Benko suddenly got flooded with tournament invitations when he gave his place to Fischer. But, when he dies this gesture on his part will unquestionably be well-publicized!

As for Fischer's apparent failure to at least thank the former Hungarian, well, that's probably typical Fischer.

In fact, I recall from the book Chess World Championship 1972, someone (Fred Cramer I think) was quoted at one point that Fischer was in such a "purring mood" that he actually "thanked" Cramer (or whoever it was) for working on a request to get the squares enlarged on the match chessboard. That person went on to addd, "Imagine that--Bobby Fischer thanking me for something!"

Remind me to look that up in the book to see exactly who said that. I'm not home right now.

Jul-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Howard,

It's a just a few sad mouths howling in the wind wrongly calling 'foul' 48 years after the event because Fischer was allowed into the Interzonal.

It's clear everyone (except in hindsight the Russians) wanted him to play.

No law was broken, a player wanted to give his spot to another, the American federation agreed to put Fischer forward and FIDE welcomed him in.

The organisers of the Interzonal were so desperate to secure Fischer they offered and paid Fischer a $15,000 appearance fee (Levy article Chess 1970).

He justified everyone's faith in him winning it by a clear 3 pts. And then the fun really began...

Jul-16-18  ewan14: Euwe wanted Fischer to play ( in the interzonal ) to validate the WORLD chess championship
Jul-16-18  ughaibu: Euwe wanted a non-Soviet, with a realistic chance of winning, to play for the PR value.
Jul-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Sally Simpson> If any of those who finished below Benko disagreed then the deal was off. Benko makes it very clear he offered his place to Bobby Fischer, no one else.>

What you need to keep in mind is that Benko had no say who he gave his place to. He could certainly give up his place for whatever reason, for example, if he was sick. But the choice of his replacement was the USCF's not Benko's decision. And, in cases of anyone withdrawing for whatever reason, his place is typically taken up by the next finisher which in this case would have been Lombardy, who finished 4th. <And so on down the line if the 4th place finisher couldn't or wouldn't participate>. This has been comprehensively discussed in the World Cup 2017 page and the Fischer player page, here are some links to the discussions: World Cup (2017) (kibitz #3225).

Clearly if Benko wanted to give his place only to Fischer this needed to be arranged ahead of time to ensure that all the other players also agreed to also give up their places. As you said, Benko was quoted as saying that "The idea for me to step down and give Fischer my place was my own; it was made voluntarily and without pressure from anyone." And I would tend to believe him, except that the words "pressure" and "suggestion" have different meanings. Benko wanted to make sure that if he gave up his place in the Interzonal his spot would go to Fischer. I doubt that Benko was in a position, or sufficiently motivated, to accomplish that, so I suspect that the "suggestion" came from Ed Edmonson, the executive director of the USCF at the time and a big fan of Fischer. After checking with Benko and getting his concurrence <and> the concurrence of all the other players in the 1969 US Chess Tournament that finished lower than Benko, it became a done deal.

So Benko could very well have been telling the truth; he was not subjected to any "pressure" from anyone, including Ed Edmonson, but the "suggestion" could easily and likely have come from him. And, since Benko was truly grateful (I believe him on this) to the USA and the USCF, it is quite possible that he was very willing to step aside.

I'll be the first to admit that this is all conjecture on my part, I have no supporting evidence. But it is the only scenario that makes sense to me given all the discussions on the subject.

Jul-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Howard> I guess my reasoning had I been a top-three finisher in '69, would be that if I hardly "had a chance in hell" (to quote myself) of making the Candidates, why NOT cede my place to Fischer?>

That comment about "a chance in hell" got me thinking (always a bad idea). Just exactly (or at least approximately) were Benko's chances for qualifying for the 1971 Candidates Knockout Matches?

I tried to calculate it quantitatively; i.e. given each player's ratings what would be the probability that Benko would finish in one of the top 6 places?

By the time that the 1969 US Championship finished several rating lists had been compiled by Dr. Elo and unofficially submitted to FIDE before FIDE's official adoption of the Elo rating system in 1970. These were the ratings of the players (other than Fischer since Benko would have taken his place) participating in the 1970 Palma de Majorca Interzonal, their ratings based on the May-1969 rating list compiled by Dr. Elo, Benko's rating differential (RDiff) against each player, and Benko's scoring probability (SP, probability of a Win or Draw) against each player based on the RDiff between Benko and each of the other players. The top 6 finishers qualified for the 1971 Candidates Knockout Matches, these are highlighted in angle brackets.

Finish Player Rating RDiff Benko's SP

<2-4> <Larsen, Bent> 2630 (90) 0.375167

<2-4> <Geller, Efim P.> 2620 (80) 0.388649

7-8 Portisch, Lajos 2620 (80) 0.388649

7-8 Smyslov, Vassily 2620 (80) 0.388649

9-10 Polugaevsky, Lev 2610 (70) 0.402266

9-10 Gligoric, Svetozar 2590 (50) 0.429842

13 Hort, Vlastimil 2590 (50) 0.429842

<5-6> <Taimanov, Mark E.> 2590 (50) 0.429842

17 Reshevsky, Samuel H. 2570 (30) 0.457765

18-19 Matulovic, Milan 2560 (20) 0.471814

N/A Benko, Pal 2540 0 0.500000

14 Ivkov, Borislav 2540 0 0.500000

<5-6> <Uhlmann, Wolfgang> 2540 0 0.500000

15-16 Ciric, Dragoljub M. 2530 10 0.514102

11-12 Mecking, Henrique 2530 10 0.514102

11-12 Panno, Oscar 2530 10 0.514102

20-22 Filip, Miroslav 2510 30 0.542235

<2-4> <Huebner, Robert> 2490 50 0.570158

18-19 Addison, Wiliam G. 2470 70 0.597734

15-16 Suttles, Duncan 2430 110 0.651328

23 Rubinetti, Jorge 2420 120 0.664313

24 Jimenez, Eleazar 2400 140 0.689691

20-22 Ujtumen, Tudev 2400 140 0.689691

20-22 Naranja, Renato N/A N/A N/A

But I couldn't figure out how to explicitly compute the probability that Benko would finish in one of the top 6 places given the SPs. Does anybody know how to do it?

So let me try to express it qualitatively. Keep in mind that by 1979 Benko was an experienced international GM; remember that he qualified for the 1962 Curacao Candidates Tournament. So he certainly had the experience of qualifying for a Candidates tournament.

Ten players were rated higher than Benko, 2 players were rated the same, and 12 players were rated below Benko if Naranja, who wasn't rated in the May-1969 rated list and therefore I would consider him to be the lowest rated player if he'd been rated. So I would qualitatively assess the probability of Benko finishing in the top half of the tournament to be about 0.5. And, as a sanity check, Hubner did finish in the top 6 even though he was rated 50 points <lower> than Benko. So it certainly seems possible for Benko, rated above Huebner, to have also finished in the top 6.

Of course, these are all only probabilities and observations so it's not certain or even necessarily likely that Benko would have finished in the top 6. But I would say that he had better then a "chance in hell" of doing so. However, Benko's chances of winning the 1971 Candidates Knockout matches <and> defeating Spassky in the 1972 WCC match probably were not much better than "a chance in hell". So that was certainly a motivation, at least for the USCF, for Fischer to take Benko's place.

Jul-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Sally Simpson> It's a just a few sad mouths howling in the wind wrongly calling 'foul' 48 years after the event because Fischer was allowed into the Interzonal.>

I'm not sure what else you would call it. (1) Fischer didn't qualify for the 1970 Interzonal because he did not play in the qualifying event, the 1969 US Chess Championship, (2) Every player that finished below Addison had to agree to give up their place in order for Fischer to participate, (3) FIDE , specifically it's president, Euwe, had to agree to let him in.

And for not qualifying for the 1970 Interzonal Fischer had no one but himself to blame.

<No law was broken, a player wanted to give his spot to another, the American federation agreed to put Fischer forward and FIDE welcomed him in.>

"Welcoming him in" would not be the words I would have used. Frank Brady in "Profile of a Prodigy" says that "At the FIDE Congress, the 41st, heated discussion erupted over the possibility of allowing Fischer into the Interzonal. The vote was close but negative, with the Soviets especially adamant about making any changes in the existing sequence of the selection of challengers, since the process was already in motion." And I find this part interesting: "There was strong sentiment, however, to allow Fischer to play if one of the three American qualifiers would drop out in his behalf. The USCF received authorization from the Congress to revise its list of Interzonal entrants, ..."

I think that the above is confusing. I think it deals with the proposal to expand the number of entrants in the 1970 Interzonal from 24 to 26 so that Fischer plus another player (or theoretically any other 2 players could play). If the vote had been whether to explicitly allow Fischer to play and the vote was negative, that would imply that the vote was to NOT to allow Fischer to play. And, as we all know, that didn't happen.

But discussion does makes it seem that the idea for one of the top 3 US qualifiers to give up their spot to Fischer came from FIDE, not the USCF or Edmonson.

As far as no "law" being broken, that's true; FIDE allowed the USCF to replace one of its entrants with Fischer. But, as I've said before several times, this could have been avoided if the USCF, knowing that there was a very strong possibility that Fischer would not participate in the qualifying 1969 US Championship, did not set up its qualification rules so that the top 2 finishers in the 1969 US Championship plus an at large entry would be the US entrants to the 1970 Interzonal. This was hardly without precedent before or since, and the national chess federations were given sole discretion by FIDE on who their representatives would be. Had FIDE been on the ball, there would have been no controversy. But, like I also said earlier, FIDE didn't ask me.

<The organisers of the Interzonal were so desperate to secure Fischer they offered and paid Fischer a $15,000 appearance fee (Levy article Chess 1970).>

Somehow I doubt that the Interzonal organizers decided to pay Fischer an extra $ 15,000 out of the kindness of their hearts. More likely and consistent with past and future events was that Fischer <demanded> the extra $ 15,000 and the organizers gave in. Since I don't have a copy of the article you referenced, I can't verify that. What, if anything, does the article say about the $ 15,000?

Jul-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi AylerKupp,

Benko 1974:

"The idea for me to step down and give Fischer my place was my own; it was made voluntarily and without pressure from anyone."

You 2018:

" I doubt that Benko was in a position, or sufficiently motivated, to accomplish that, so I suspect that the "suggestion" came from Ed Edmonson..."

So you suspect that Benko was lying.

OK.

Jul-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Sally Simpson> So you suspect that Benko was lying.>

Yes and no. I was very careful to make a distinction between "pressure" and "suggestion". All I'm saying was that Benko finessed the issue for reasons I can't figure out. As a person that was incarcerated by the Soviet Union he certainly knew the difference between "pressure" and "suggestion".

But, no, I don't believe him when he says that the idea was his own. As I've listed above, it was at the 41st FIDE Congress that <FIDE> gave the USCF the authorization to revise its list of Interzonal entrants, and it gave the USCF about 6 weeks to report back if a chance was to be made. And he couldn't just give up his spot to Fischer, it would have gone to the 4th place finisher, Lombardy. So it makes sense that the USCF, through Edmonson, "suggested" that idea to Benko and others, and did the necessary coordination. Six weeks would have been ample time to do that coordination. It would be interesting to know the delay between the end of the 1969 US Championship and the USCF's announcement of who the 3 US representatives to the 1970 Interzonal would be.

It is also clear that Benko <did> receive $ 2,000 for "something". He claims that it was compensation for acting as a second to Reshevsky and Addison. Ed Edmonson said in (https://en.chessbase.com/post/congr...) that he received the same $ 2,000 as Reshevsky and Addison received for earning a spot on the 1970 Interzonal. And Benko in https://en.chessbase.com/post/congr... agrees that he was offered the same amount by Edmonson but that he declined it. Yet Benko also says that he went to Palma de Mallorca in 1970 despite having agreed to yield his spot in the Interzonal to Fischer just in case Fischer should change his mind and decide not to play after all. Given Fischer's history of withdrawing from tournaments and not fulfilling his commitments that seemed like a prudent thing to do. And maybe that was part of the "arrangement".

And it seems fair to me, Benko was already being magnanimous in giving up his spot in the Interzonal, he might not have agreed to also give up the $ 2,000 for, unlike Fischer, earning a spot. But, since that seems reasonable to me, I don't know why Edmonson and Benko didn't get their story straight. Perhaps Benko thought that it would perceived (as it was) that he was paid the $ 2,000 to withdraw. But if Reshevsky and Addison were also paid $ 2,000 then that wouldn't make any sense.

Someone is lying, either Benko or Edmonson. Take your pick while considering which version makes the most sense.

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