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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Petropolis Interzonal Tournament

Henrique Mecking12/17(+7 -0 =10)[games]
Efim Geller11.5/17(+7 -1 =9)[games]
Lev Polugaevsky11.5/17(+7 -1 =9)[games]
Lajos Portisch11.5/17(+7 -1 =9)[games]
Vasily Smyslov11/17(+7 -2 =8)[games]
David Bronstein10.5/17(+7 -3 =7)[games]
Vlastimil Hort10/17(+6 -3 =8)[games]
Vladimir Savon9.5/17(+5 -3 =9)[games]
Borislav Ivkov9/17(+2 -1 =14)[games]
Ljubomir Ljubojevic9/17(+6 -5 =6)[games]
Samuel Reshevsky8.5/17(+5 -5 =7)[games]
Oscar Panno8/17(+3 -4 =10)[games]
Paul Keres8/17(+3 -4 =10)[games]
Florin Gheorghiu7.5/17(+3 -5 =9)[games]
Peter Biyiasas6.5/17(+3 -7 =7)[games]
Lian-Ann Tan3/17(+0 -11 =6)[games]
Werner Hug3/17(+0 -11 =6)[games]
Shimon Kagan3/17(+2 -13 =2)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Petropolis Interzonal (1973)

In the preceding FIDE cycles there had been one Interzonal, such as the Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970). The year of 1973 marked the debut of two Interzonals. As was the Leningrad Interzonal (1973) (in June), the Petropolis Interzonal was an 18-player round robin with the top three players qualifying for the Candidates matches. The winner was Mecking with 12.0/17 (+7 =10 -0), and there was a three-way tie for second place - Polugaevsky, Portisch and Geller. Since only three players could qualify for the Candidates matches, a playoff was held later in the year.

Petropolis, Brazil, 23 July - 17 August 1973

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts SonBe 1 Mecking * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 12 =2 Geller ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 1 11½ 89.50 =2 Polugaevsky ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 11½ 88.00 =2 Portisch ½ ½ 0 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 11½ 85.50 5 Smyslov 0 ½ ½ ½ * 0 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 11 =6 Bronstein ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 * 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 10½ =6 Hort ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 * 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 10 8 Savon 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 0 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 9½ =9 Ivkov ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 9 72.75 =9 Ljubojevic ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 1 ½ * 0 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 9 67.50 11 Reshevsky 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 * 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 8½ =12 Panno ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 8 62.50 =12 Keres ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 1 1 8 54.25 14 Gheorghiu 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 7½ 15 Biyiasas ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 1 6½ =16 Tan 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 0 3 22.00 =16 Hug 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 3 20.25 =16 Kagan 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ * 3 19.50

Chief arbiter: Walter Kühnle-Woods. Chief organisers: Washington de Oliveira and Ronald Camara. (1)

Mecking qualified directly, whereas Portisch and Polugaevsky qualified via the Portoroz Interzonal Playoff (1973) (by eliminating Geller). The three were joined by Anatoly Karpov, Viktor Korchnoi and Robert Eugene Byrne (from the Leningrad Interzonal) for play against Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian (who qualified as losing finalist in 1971) and Boris Spassky (who qualified as ex-World Champion in 1972) in the next year's Candidates matches:

Spassky - Byrne Candidates Quarterfinal (1974)
Petrosian - Portisch Candidates Quarterfinal (1974)
Karpov - Polugaevsky Candidates Quarterfinal (1974)
Korchnoi - Mecking Candidates Quarterfinal (1974)

(1) World Championship Interzonals. Leningrad-Petropolis 1973 by Robert Wade, Leslie Stephen Fraser Blackstock and Alexander Kotov (Batsford, London 1974), p. 159.

Original collection: Game Collection: Interzonals 1973: Petropolis, by User: capybara.

 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. L A Tan vs Smyslov 0-1371973Petropolis InterzonalB07 Pirc
2. Savon vs Bronstein ½-½601973Petropolis InterzonalC96 Ruy Lopez, Closed
3. P Biyiasas vs S Kagan 1-0401973Petropolis InterzonalB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
4. Panno vs Gheorghiu  ½-½121973Petropolis InterzonalA13 English
5. Hort vs Geller  ½-½161973Petropolis InterzonalA38 English, Symmetrical
6. Reshevsky vs Polugaevsky  ½-½271973Petropolis InterzonalE17 Queen's Indian
7. Ljubojevic vs Hug  1-0531973Petropolis InterzonalC17 French, Winawer, Advance
8. Ivkov vs Mecking ½-½351973Petropolis InterzonalB92 Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation
9. Portisch vs Keres 1-0391973Petropolis InterzonalA17 English
10. Gheorghiu vs Hort  ½-½191973Petropolis InterzonalB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
11. Hug vs Ivkov  ½-½171973Petropolis InterzonalC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
12. S Kagan vs Ljubojevic  0-1401973Petropolis InterzonalA10 English
13. Smyslov vs Portisch  ½-½411973Petropolis InterzonalA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
14. Geller vs L A Tan 1-0521973Petropolis InterzonalB01 Scandinavian
15. Keres vs Reshevsky ½-½241973Petropolis InterzonalC95 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Breyer
16. Polugaevsky vs Savon  ½-½321973Petropolis InterzonalA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
17. Bronstein vs P Biyiasas  ½-½431973Petropolis InterzonalC77 Ruy Lopez
18. Mecking vs Panno  ½-½411973Petropolis InterzonalC67 Ruy Lopez
19. P Biyiasas vs Ljubojevic  0-1401973Petropolis InterzonalA07 King's Indian Attack
20. L A Tan vs Gheorghiu  ½-½811973Petropolis InterzonalB44 Sicilian
21. Panno vs Hug 1-0301973Petropolis InterzonalE61 King's Indian
22. Reshevsky vs Smyslov ½-½471973Petropolis InterzonalE17 Queen's Indian
23. Hort vs Mecking  ½-½411973Petropolis InterzonalA30 English, Symmetrical
24. Portisch vs Geller  ½-½231973Petropolis InterzonalE92 King's Indian
25. Savon vs Keres  ½-½161973Petropolis InterzonalC69 Ruy Lopez, Exchange, Gligoric Variation
 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 153  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: In the game Reshevsky vs Savon, 1973 Reshevesky should've won, but he didn't. He lost. If he won that game, he would finish ahead of Savon in the standings instead of behind. Still not good enough to qualify, but still.
Feb-15-14  Everett: Bronstein missed a mate vs Savon in the first round as well.
Feb-15-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Eerett> I took a look at Savon vs Bronstein, 1973, and don't see where Bronstein missed a mate.
Feb-16-14  Everett: <Phony Benoni: <Eerett> I took a look at Savon vs Bronstein, 1973, and don't see where Bronstein missed a mate.>

I took a look at your kibitzing, and you are splitting hairs to the point of obtuseness.

My belief is that if Bronstein noticed the mating <pattern> he would have seen the forced win starting with. <52..g4>.

As you know, a potential mate in a position does not always result in mate, but often creates losing positions when trying to avoid it. This is just such a case, if Bronstein saw the mate.

But, if you are so inclined to say the point of your statement is "there is no immediate mate," with best play,you are correct. Next time you can kibitz <Everett, saw your post, but noticed a way for Savon to avoid the mate, yet he would still be dead lost. Thanks for pointing out the game to me.> If you are to say that the recognition of the possibility of mate has no bearing on the position, then we disagree.

So, in my opinion, Bronstein missed direct threats to his opponents king, didn't see the potential mate, and did not reap the benefits.

Feb-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Everett> Thank you for explaining that. Obviously, I misunderstood your statement. Whenever I see the phrase <"missed a mate">, I interpret that to mean an immediate forced mate such as the one Reshevesky missed against Savon.
Feb-16-14  Everett: <PhonyBenoni> I should have been more precise. I'll try to be so in the future. Thanks for pointing it out.

In any case, Savon had his fair share of luck in this tournament.

Sep-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Penguincw: In the game Reshevsky vs Savon, 1973 Reshevesky should've won, but he didn't....>

Reshevsky was clearly worse in the middlegame before his opponent pitched it back to him; it was not quite so clear-cut as your portrayal.

May-24-18  gmgomes: Mecking became a kind of National Hero in Brazil after this triumph.

Petropolis is known as a Imperial City, just one hour away (by car) from Rio de Janeiro.

His win against former world champion Smyslov is a very interesting game.

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