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London (Vizayanagaram) (1883)

  PARTICIPANTS (sorted by highest achieved rating; click on name to see player's games)
George Alcock MacDonnell, George Hatfeild Gossip, Charles Edward Ranken, Isidor Gunsberg, Levi Benima, James Innes Minchin, Curt von Bardeleben, John Lord, Francis Sidney Ensor, William Leighton Newham, Henry Lee, James Samuel West, Bernard William Fisher, William Alexander Lindsay, William Elliott Vyse, Thomas Henry Piper, Leon Febvret, Charles James Lambert, Walter Montagu Gattie, Richard Roe Rabson, Cyril Bexley Vansittart, William Hugh Alexander Mundell, F Hunter

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
London (Vizayanagaram) (1883)
This was the minor event held at the same time as London (1883). It was funded by a 200 donation by the Maharajah of Vizayanagaram (perhaps more accurately spelled Vizianagram), which was split into five prizes of 60, 50, 40, 30, 20. Four additional prizes, totalling 40, were added later: 15 for 6th place, 10 for 7th, 8 for 8th, 7 for 9th. The qualifications for players to be admitted were reported in the British Chess Magazine, March 1883, p. 103:

This tournament shall be open to such players of all nations as shall not, in the opinion of the Managing Committee, be clearly marked out by their public performance as eligible only for the major tournament. The committee in deciding such eligibility will be guide principally by the following considerations: 1. Whether a player in any international tournament since 1869 has made a score equal to half the score of the winner. 2. Whether a player has in public match play achieved distinction equivalent to the preceding.

The experimental rule in the International tournament requiring that draws be replayed was not in force for this minor tournament, so that draws counted the usual 1/2 for each player. The time control was 20 moves in one hour, and hours of play were scheduled from 7:00 PM until midnight so as not to conflict with the morning sessions of the International tournament. However, players were given the option of playing in the morning as well, and many took advantage of this to finish their schedule sooner. Hence, any round-by-round summary would be misleading, even if such were available. Most of the players came from various regions of England, but one of the few foreigners carried off the honors.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 Curt von Bardeleben X 1 1 = 1 = = 1 1 1 0 1 = 1 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 21.5 2 Bernard William Fisher 0 X 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 20.5 3 George Alcock MacDonnell 0 0 X 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 = 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 19.5 4 Isidor Gunsberg = 1 0 X 1 = 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 19.0 5 George Hatfeild Gossip 0 0 1 0 X 1 0 = 1 1 = = 0 1 1 = = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 17.5 6 Charles Edward Ranken = 1 1 = 0 X = 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 = 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 17.5 7 Charles James Lambert = 0 0 0 1 = X 0 0 1 1 1 0 = 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 16.5 8 Thomas Henry Piper 0 1 0 0 = 0 1 X 0 0 1 1 1 = = = 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 16.0 9 Henry Lee 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 X 0 = 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 15.5 10 William Hugh A. Mundell 0 = 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 X 1 1 1 0 = 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 15.0 11 Walter Montague Gattie 1 0 0 1 = 1 0 0 = 0 x 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.5 12 F Hunter 0 0 0 0 = 0 0 0 1 0 1 X 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 14.5 13 John Lord = 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 X 0 1 = 1 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.5 14 William Alexander Lindsay 0 0 0 0 0 0 = = 0 1 1 1 1 X 0 = = 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 12.0 15 James Innes Minchin 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 = 0 = 0 0 0 1 X 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 12.0 16 William Elliott Vyse = 0 = 0 = 0 0 = 0 1 0 0 = = 0 X 0 = = 1 1 1 = 1 1 1 11.5 17 Francis Sidney Ensor 0 0 0 0 = 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 1 X 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11.0 18 Levi Benima 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 = 0 X 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 10.5 19 Cyril Vansittart 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 1 1 0 1 0 = 0 0 = 1 1 X 0 1 0 = 1 = 1 10.5 20 Leon Febvret 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 X = 1 1 1 1 0 8.0 21 William Leighton Newham 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = X 0 1 1 1 1 7.0 22 James Samuel West 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 X 1 0 1 1 7.0 23 Richard Roe Rabson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 1 = 0 0 0 X 1 1 1 6.0 24 Arthur Giles Puller 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 X 1 1 4.0 25 Richard Pilkington 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 0 0 0 0 X 1 1.5 26 F H Dudley 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 X 1.0

The game between Gunsberg and Lee was given as a loss for both players.

A report from the British Chess Magazine, June 1883, pp. 208-209:

"In the Vizayanagram Tournament the conditions of play imposed a much heavier strain upon those of the competitors (and these were the majority) who elected to do battle in the morning as well as the evening; in fact we may say that it was something like giving odds, and when we remember that players such as Bardeleben, Gossip, Gunsberg, Gattie, Lee, and Piper played only in the evening, it is obvious that the advantage they thus obtained must have contributed not a few additions to their score."

"The shorter time limit of 20 moves an hour in this tourney naturally pressed very severly upon the slower and more nervous competitors. Messrs. Lindsay, Minchin, and Ranken seem especially to have felt this, for none of them by any means did himself justice, and the latter, after winning or drawing with all the topmost players, threw away won games to Messrs. Gossip and Lord, and games that were easily drawn to Messrs. Gattie and Lee, simply for want of sufficient time to examine his moves in very difficult positions."

"Mr. Minchin was of course heavily handicapped also by his official duties as Hon. Secretary, and by the constant anxiety and interruption which such a post necessarily entails."

"Other players from whom more might naturally have been expected were Messrs. Ensor and MacDonnell, both, however, were very much out of form for want of practice, and consequently lost game after game to men whom they could at other times have probably beaten."

"Messrs. Bardeleben, Fischer, Gunsberg, Gossip, Lee, and Piper played very steadily, and on the whole very well. They all thoroughly deserve the high positions they have attained, but the greatest credit we think is due to Mr. Fisher, as he alone of them fought both morning and evening. He has upheld the credit of the C.C.A. in the Minor Tourney like Mr. Skipworth in the other, and for the first week he had not lost or drawn a single game."

"Another C.C.A. man who has greatly improved is Mr. Lambert, as may be seen by the very respectable total shown by his score. M. Benima is a Dutchman hailing from Groningen, who we think would have stood higher but for his nervousness, for some of his games he played exceedingly well. M. Febvret, though French, has long been resident in London; his style is rapid and impetuous, but somewhat wants ballast."

"Herr von Bardeleben is a quiet-mannered, unassuming young man who has won prizes at the Leipsic Augusten Club; he has shown a great talent for the game and rarely makes any mistakes."

"Mr. Vansittart is an English player living at Rome, and a very promising young player. Messrs. Lee and Gattie are strong and very improving amateurs trained in the University Club at Oxford; Mr. Gunsberg is well known as the Mentor of Mephisto, though one would not suppose that gentleman required an adviser, and his genius for the game makes him a most formidable antagonist; Mr. Piper is a rising young player of the City of London Club."

"Of the rest of the competitors it is hardly necessary to speak."

Original collection: Game Collection: London 1883 Vizayanagaram Tournament, by User: Phony Benoni.

 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 59  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. T H Piper vs C E Ranken  0-1341883London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
2. T H Piper vs B W Fisher  1-0211883London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
3. T H Piper vs F S Ensor 1-0241883London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
4. T H Piper vs L Benima 1-0381883London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
5. W L Newham vs Gunsberg 1-0461883London (Vizayanagaram)C48 Four Knights
6. W Mundell vs H Lee  1-0531883London (Vizayanagaram)C65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
7. J Minchin vs W Vyse  1-0391883London (Vizayanagaram)C58 Two Knights
8. J Minchin vs G MacDonnell  0-1441883London (Vizayanagaram)C48 Four Knights
9. J Minchin vs J Lord  0-1541883London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
10. J Minchin vs Gunsberg  1-0411883London (Vizayanagaram)D05 Queen's Pawn Game
11. G MacDonnell vs Von Bardeleben  0-1381883London (Vizayanagaram)B40 Sicilian
12. G MacDonnell vs T H Piper  1-0431883London (Vizayanagaram)A02 Bird's Opening
13. G MacDonnell vs Gunsberg 1-0661883London (Vizayanagaram)C37 King's Gambit Accepted
14. T H Piper vs W A Lindsay  ½-½631883London (Vizayanagaram)B30 Sicilian
15. T H Piper vs J Minchin  ½-½271883London (Vizayanagaram)D05 Queen's Pawn Game
16. R Rabson vs H Lee 0-1531883London (Vizayanagaram)C40 King's Knight Opening
17. C E Ranken vs J Lord 0-1311883London (Vizayanagaram)C66 Ruy Lopez
18. C E Ranken vs F S Ensor  1-0391883London (Vizayanagaram)C45 Scotch Game
19. J S West vs Gunsberg 0-1361883London (Vizayanagaram)C49 Four Knights
20. W Vyse vs C E Ranken  0-1371883London (Vizayanagaram)C65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
21. W Vyse vs W A Lindsay  ½-½351883London (Vizayanagaram)C65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
22. Von Bardeleben vs J Minchin  1-0261883London (Vizayanagaram)D37 Queen's Gambit Declined
23. Von Bardeleben vs L Benima  1-0571883London (Vizayanagaram)A20 English
24. C B Vansittart vs T H Piper 1-0441883London (Vizayanagaram)C11 French
25. C E Ranken vs C J Lambert  ½-½301883London (Vizayanagaram)C11 French
 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 59  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: What is Vizay an anagram of?
Dec-04-13  YoungEd: Azyiv, for one!
Apr-16-14  ekanth: Vijay means victory and nagaram means city
Apr-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: Henry Edward Bird in a letter to a newspaper regarding preparations for the tournament.

<Pusapati Ananda Gajapati Raju> (December 31, 1850 May 23, 1897) was the then Maharaja of the Vizianagaram (Andhra Pradesh, India).

"The second London International Chess Tournament owes its origin mainly to the Rajah of Vizayanagaram and a friend, who contributed respectively 200 and 100 in aid of the objects of the meeting, and the committee have decided, wisely we think, in tbe exercise of their discretion, to have a special tournament as a memento of the Rajah's liberality to be called the "Vizayanagaram International Chess Tournament." It is also termed the "Minor Tournament" (not a very happy expression), possibly, however, because those players commonly recognised from their records in matches and tournaments as of the front rank cannot participate. Thus Steinitz, Zukertort, Winawer, Blackburne, Bird. Mackenzie, Mason, and few of the most successful Continental players will probably be excluded; but other players of near first-class force, who have not similarly distinguished themselves, will be considered eligible.

The prizes offered for competition are: lst, 60; 2nd, 50; 3rd, 40; 4th, 30; 5th 20, and one, two, or more smaller prizes will be given from the entries, according to their number. Unless 16 competitors enter, the scale of prizes will be reduced by one half. The entrance fee is fixed at 1 only, that the first-class tournament being 5. The same ride is adeled requiring 5 deposit from each player, as a guarantee that he will carry out the rules of the tournament; hut we sincerely hope, as urged in our last, that this stipulation can be dispensed with. The time limit is to be 20 moves an hour, as compared with 15 moves an hour in the principal tournament. It is estimated that it will occupy about one month."

H. E. Bird
5 Heygate-street,
Walworth-road,
London.

<Source: "Northampton Mercury", Saturday 24th February 1883, p.6.>

Jul-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Chessical>, what does "ride is adeled" mean?
Dec-16-15  Flipboard Newsstand: Amazing list of participants: Gunsberg, Fisher, Piper, Lord, MacDonnell, Vyse, Ranken. But Hunter takes the Visayan Anagram methinks.
Dec-16-15  Flipboard Newsstand: They also have Hatfeild Gossip, Dudley and Puller
Apr-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: From the main tournament TB, regarding the origins of this tournament:

<Before the close of January the prospects of the Tournament brightened greatly, and the Committee were confident that complete success would be attained. Mr. Steel, an ardent supporter of the cause, organised a committee of co-operation in Calcutta and opened subscriptions throughout India. The Viceroy of India and the Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal supported the project, and their example was followed liberally by natives and Europeans alike in the Northern Presidency, so that upwards of 200 was remitted to England from this source. At the same time assistance of the most munificent description arrived from Southern India. In answer to applications from Mr. Minchin, H.H. Rama Varma, Maharaja of Travancore, the only independant sovran within the limits of the Madras Presidency, and one of the most enlightened princes of India, sent a donation of 80 to the funds of the Tournament, and, about the same time, the Maharaja of Vizayanagaram, the leading nobleman and largest landed proprietor in Southern India, sent by telegram to Mr. Minchin the sum of 200, which he placed at his disposal for any prizes he might determine upon in connection with the International Tournament.

Mr. Minchin during his official service in India had been intimately acquainted with the father of the present Maharaja of Vizayanagaram and with the donor himself, who was at that period an interesting youth, delighting in manly sports and in association with English gentlemen. He regarded the Maharaja's commission as a trust, and determined on carrying it out in the manner that would give the most satisfaction to the son of his old friend. As a Minor Tournament had always formed part of the Com mittee's scheme, which want of funds had hitherto prevented from being carried out, Mr. Minchin determined to devote the Maharaja's princely donation to found a separate Tournament, to be called, in his honour, after his own name. He, therefore, offered the amount to the Committee for this specific purpose and no other, and on that understanding the donation was accepted.

Mr. Minchin's action in this matter was subjected at the time to much opposition and some not very generous criticism. Gentlemen, whose only acquaintance with Oriental races was a casual meeting with a dusky crossing sweeper in the streets of London, gravely informed him that he was disgracing the Maharaja's liberality by allowing his prizes to be played for by second-class Chess-players ! It was confidently asserted that no Chess-player of mark would join in a second-class contest, that certainly no foreigner would enter, and that it would degenerate into a meeting of the English Counties Chess Association, playing for prizes of preposterous value in a contest which could in no way be considered International.

Undeterred by such criticisms, Mr. Minchin persisted in carrying out his scheme, determined in the first place to give the Maharaja of Vizayanagaram a Tournament of his own,and in the second to broaden the field of interest in the International Tournament by holding a second-class contest simultaneously with that for masters, which should free the latter to a great extent from the cumbersome entrance of ambitious amateurs, and allow the latter to compete in their own field with such professional antagonists as were confessedly not of the highest rank.

His hope was that the Master Tournament would be confiucd to about twelve of the leading masters of the world of Chess, struggling with each other on terms that would insure its due supremacy to skill aud genins, and that the Vizayanagarain Tournament might at the same time employ the energies of the strong players of all countries below the highest class in friendly competition for prizes not unworthy of the occasion. In spite of some disappointments that hope was realised.>

TB xiv-xv/23-24

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