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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Cap D'Agde Tournament

Anatoly Karpov11/14(+8 -0 =6)[games]
Etienne Bacrot9/14(+5 -1 =8)[games]
Vassily Ivanchuk8/14(+3 -1 =10)[games]
Yannick Pelletier8/14(+5 -3 =6)[games]
Mariya Muzychuk8/14(+6 -4 =4)[games]
Marie Sebag7.5/14(+4 -3 =7)[games]
Zhao Xue4/14(+2 -8 =4)[games]
Nino Maisuradze0.5/14(+0 -13 =1)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Cap D'Agde (2013)

The Rapid tournament Le trophee Anatoly Karpov (Karpov Trophy) was played in Cap d'Agde, France 25 October - 2 November 2013, as part of the Cap d'Agde Chess Festival. Time control: 25 minutes for the whole game + 10 seconds per move from move 1. Official site with results: http://www.capechecs.com/resultats/.... TWIC: http://theweekinchess.com/chessnews.... Crosstable (preliminary, 25-31 October):

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 1 Karpov ** 1½ ½1 1½ 11 ½½ 1½ 11 11 2 Bacrot 0½ ** ½½ ½½ 1½ ½½ 11 11 9 3 Ivanchuk ½0 ½½ ** ½1 ½1 ½½ ½½ ½1 8 4 Pelletier 0½ ½½ ½0 ** 0½ ½1 11 11 8 5 Muzychuk 00 0½ ½0 1½ ** 11 ½1 11 8 6 Sebag ½½ ½½ ½½ ½0 00 ** 11 11 7½ 7 Zhao Xue 0½ 00 ½½ 00 ½0 00 ** 11 4 8 Maisuradze 00 00 ½0 00 00 00 00 ** ½

The four best would advance to a knock-out final, so 3rd and 4th place had to be decided by a playoff (3 min + 2 sec, 31 October):

1 Ivanchuk ** 01 11 3 2 Muzychuk 10 ** 11 3 3 Pelletier 00 00 ** 0

Karpov, Bacrot, Ivanchuk and Muzychuk advanced to the knock-out final (25 min + 10 sec). There was also a 3 min + 2 sec playoff Ivanchuk vs M Muzychuk, 2013 (1/2) and M Muzychuk vs Ivanchuk, 2013 (0-1). In the semifinals, Karpov defeated Muzychuk (M Muzychuk vs Karpov, 2013 1/2, Karpov vs M Muzychuk, 2013 1-0) and Bacrot defeated Ivanchuk (Bacrot vs Ivanchuk, 2013 1-0, Ivanchuk vs Bacrot, 2013 0-1). Then in the final (2 November), Bacrot defeated Karpov (Karpov vs Bacrot, 2013 1/2, Bacrot vs Karpov, 2013 1/2, Karpov vs Bacrot, 2013 0-1, Bacrot vs Karpov, 2013 1-0). The latter two games were 3 min + 2 sec Blitz. Photo of winner: https://i.pinimg.com/736x/05/96/1c/...

 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 56  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Pelletier vs M Sebag  ½-½462013Cap D'AgdeB10 Caro-Kann
2. M Sebag vs Bacrot  ½-½152013Cap D'AgdeC67 Ruy Lopez
3. N Maisuradze vs Pelletier  0-1372013Cap D'AgdeA40 Queen's Pawn Game
4. Zhao Xue vs Ivanchuk  ½-½332013Cap D'AgdeA41 Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6)
5. Bacrot vs M Muzychuk 1-0382013Cap D'AgdeA38 English, Symmetrical
6. Karpov vs Ivanchuk ½-½612013Cap D'AgdeD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
7. M Muzychuk vs Karpov 0-1422013Cap D'AgdeB01 Scandinavian
8. N Maisuradze vs Zhao Xue  0-1602013Cap D'AgdeA45 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Karpov vs M Sebag  ½-½412013Cap D'AgdeD12 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
10. Ivanchuk vs M Muzychuk  ½-½382013Cap D'AgdeA16 English
11. Zhao Xue vs M Muzychuk  ½-½762013Cap D'AgdeA04 Reti Opening
12. N Maisuradze vs Karpov 0-1232013Cap D'AgdeD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
13. M Sebag vs Ivanchuk  ½-½482013Cap D'AgdeC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
14. Bacrot vs N Maisuradze  1-0352013Cap D'AgdeA25 English
15. Pelletier vs Bacrot  ½-½392013Cap D'AgdeE97 King's Indian
16. Pelletier vs Zhao Xue 1-0572013Cap D'AgdeA15 English
17. Ivanchuk vs N Maisuradze ½-½242013Cap D'AgdeA25 English
18. Zhao Xue vs M Sebag  0-1622013Cap D'AgdeD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
19. Pelletier vs Ivanchuk  ½-½722013Cap D'AgdeD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
20. M Muzychuk vs M Sebag  1-0332013Cap D'AgdeB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
21. Bacrot vs Karpov 0-1432013Cap D'AgdeA28 English
22. Karpov vs Pelletier 1-0372013Cap D'AgdeE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
23. N Maisuradze vs M Muzychuk 0-1182013Cap D'AgdeA33 English, Symmetrical
24. Bacrot vs Zhao Xue  1-0412013Cap D'AgdeA15 English
25. M Muzychuk vs Pelletier 1-0762013Cap D'AgdeC41 Philidor Defense
 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 56  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  


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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-02-13  Absentee: Great, Karpov just cost me 200 chessbucks.
Nov-02-13  rusich: KARPOV is that man who CARLSEN has constantly been learning from starting from his very childhood. As Carlsen mentioned, his most beloved childhood book was Shereshevsky's "Strategy of endgame" which can be considered, at least in its considerable part, Karpov's best games collection. I really don't think anybody, even Fischer, could prove his supremacy over Karpov some 40 years ago.That not being the case, Fischer wouldn't try to pull a cheap trick over Karpov by demanding 1 game handicap in a perceived Fischer-Karpov world championship match. Another interesting fact is that KASPAROV mentioned great resemblance between Karpov and Carlsen's playing styles.
Nov-02-13  csmath: Karpov was a pleasant surprise of this tourney, result-wise. Mariya Muzhichuk is another, she held her own against Karpov just fine but failed at the important moments while down on time.

Zhau Xue is a huge disappointment, she should have been fighting for semifinal and yet she had a catastrophic result here, playing bad and self-destructive chess.

Ivanchuk also played weak, losing three games, one in better and one in won position. He could not even beat Maisuradze with whites and actually got himself in almost lost position with Maisuradze which is some feat.

Bacrot played generally at his class except in white game with Karpov where he had a solid advantage in the middlegame but then blew it away with some overly aggressive play.

Nov-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rolfo: rusich, fair view. I also really wonder who Carlsen has learnt from. (I guessed Capablanca and Karpov myself, maybe Smyslov). He say himself that he has no particular favourite. I think it is true. But I am sure that he picked up something here and there which resonanced with his natural talent
Nov-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rolfo: i must add that the early learning from farher, siblings and first trainers might be the most important
Nov-02-13  tjipa: <rusich> The 1st edition of Shereshevsky's book (1981) includes just 4 Karpov games. I do not know about the future ediitions, still the book is excellent and on youtube the author himself boasts that Carlsen has been studying it. Still, as Carlsen's recent losses against Ivanchuk and Caruana show, his endgames need a lot to be desired...
Nov-02-13  dx9293: Aha! I had always assumed Carlsen spent a lot of time studying Shereshevsky! Now I find out he has admitted this.
Nov-02-13  rusich: <tjipa> The following editions Shereshevsky's book(1988) included no less han 10 Karpov games, nearly twice as much as Fischer's and more than those of Kasparov. To the point of our discussion, what Carlsen himself said about Karpov: "Kasparov insists I play like Karpov, the comparision i am really proud of". Kasparov: "Carlsen has that tremendous ability to correctly estimate any position, the quality only KARPOV has had before".
Nov-02-13  tjipa: <rusich> Great! And I wish we could see some clash of chess-style traditions. Say, Rubinstein-Capablanca-Flohr-Smyslov-Karpov-Carls- en vs ... Actually, I am not sure about the tradition Anand belongs to... Is he like the universal Keres without Keres's psychological drawbacks?
Nov-02-13  savagerules: Karpov went down fighting but the clock got him in the end. In the must-win second blitz game 3min/2sec increment he had a winning position with Black but he time forfeited. Great result though for the 62 year old Karpov. Korchnoi, Reshevsky, Lasker and Smyslov are the gold standard for players who could still play at a high level past 60.
Nov-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <Korchnoi, Reshevsky, Lasker and Smyslov are the gold standard for players who could still play at a high level past 60.>

You missed the second oldest (behind Korchnoi) top 100 player in history, Najdorf.

<Najdorf remained active in chess to the end of his life. At age 69, he tied for second place in a very strong field at Buenos Aires 1979, with 8/13, behind winner Bent Larsen (11/13), though ahead of former world champions Tigran Petrosian and Boris Spassky. At Buenos Aires 1988, he made a score of 8½/15 for fourth place at age 78. The next year in the 1989 Argentine Championship, with several other GMs in the field, he tied for 4th–6th places, with 10/17. His last national championship was in 1991 at age 81, where he finished with a minus score. Najdorf was an exceptional blitz (five-minute) player, remaining a strong player into his 80s.> (Wikipedia)

Nov-02-13  Everett: <tjipa: <rusich> Great! And I wish we could see some clash of chess-style traditions. Say, Rubinstein-Capablanca-Flohr-Smyslov-Karpov-Carls- - en vs ... Actually, I am not sure about the tradition Anand belongs to... Is he like the universal Keres without Keres's psychological drawbacks?>

Carlsen may be like Karpov in skill-set, but no less than Shipov at NIC believes the former's temperament, especially in the opening, is a lot like Spassky.

Nov-02-13  waustad: <no less than Shipov at NIC believes the former's temperament, especially in the opening, is a lot like Spassky> Ooooh, maybe we'll do a Kings Gambit. I'm actually expecting to see some Scotch Games. For d4 or c4 games I'm not sure what to think. Carlsen seems to play almost anything and shoots for equality in the middlegame while avoiding opponent's prep.
Nov-02-13  waustad: That probably belongs on the match page, but for most of us that is spilling over and I had a natural seque.
Nov-03-13  csmath: Strange enough Karpov lost both blitzes where he was actually doing better in both.

I think he proved he can keep up with Bacrot here. Bacrot blitz rating is 2744, rapid rating 2692. Karpov's blitz rating 2644, rapid 2630.

Obviously Karpov lost both blitz games mostly due to time. In 4 rapid games he even beat Bacrot 2.5:1.5 also mostly due to Frenchman's time trouble.

The biggest impression on me was that Karpov was so fiercely competetive in semi-final and in final. He played with great energy when it was needed.

Nov-03-13  AlexandraThess: It is really disturbing that an average patzer like <csmath> is trying to downplay Karpov's achievement. Not only is Karpov capable of reaching 2700 but he can beat any of the active players today in a match, if he has the motivation. This is Anatoly Karpov, after all, the most talented and the greatest chess player of all times. He doesn't need opening preparation to beat those computer-made youngsters. No one understands chess to the extent Karpov does.
Nov-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <AlexandraThess: It is really disturbing that an average patzer like <csmath> is trying to downplay Karpov's achievement....>

While I have expressed strong views on <csmath>'s criticism of top players, you are way off the mark here. Whatever failings <csmath> may have, he is no patzer.

<....Not only is Karpov capable of reaching 2700 but he can beat any of the active players today in a match, if he has the motivation.>

This is, to say the least, debatable-he has tremendous understanding, but not the strength to compete with players of the highest class any more.

Nov-03-13  nok: <Whatever failings <csmath> may have, he is no patzer.>

I wonder what makes you think so. Unless you think repetitive strings of <X is better, unless he makes a mistake> followed by <X made a mistake. Incredible> show great chess understanding.

Nov-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <nok>: Agreed-not much to such comments, but others made by <csmath> evince greater understanding than a number of those posters who bash him-certainly <Alexandra> displays nothing but the ability to relentlessly criticise whilst offering nothing positive.
Nov-04-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: <AlexandraThess: It is really disturbing that an average patzer like <csmath> ...> No, what is really disturbing are degrading, personal attacks like yours. Please read the forum guidelines. And, btw, you are naive if you think you are doing Karpov a favour here. I am quite sure that even Karpov himself wouldn't sign your valuation of his chances in today's elite. He is far too realistic and sober in his valuations to be subject to such illusions. In fact, that made him so terribly strong in his best days.
Nov-04-13  Valmy: The most disturbing here is that the tournament standings shows KARPOV won the tournament while BACROT won.
Nov-04-13  John Abraham: <Valmy> Soviet politics.
Nov-07-13  The Rocket: Games like these, are not even played at a 2500 level.....

Karpov vs A Korobov, 2013

Nov-07-13  The Rocket: This is 1700 level:) ... Karjakin vs Karpov, 2013
Dec-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: <The most disturbing here is that the tournament standings shows KARPOV won the tournament while BACROT won.>

Is it clearer now? Karpov played well I must say with 1 rapid game per day.

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