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🏆 FIDE World Team Championship (2013)

  PARTICIPANTS (sorted by highest achieved rating; click on name to see player's games)
Levon Aronian, Vladimir Kramnik, Hikaru Nakamura, Alexander Grischuk, Anish Giri, Sergey Karjakin, Vassily Ivanchuk, Ding Liren, Ian Nepomniachtchi, Gata Kamsky, Li Chao, Wang Yue, Sergei Movsesian, Yu Yangyi, Nikita Vitiugov, Arkadij Naiditsch, Bu Xiangzhi, Alexander Moiseenko, Anton Korobov, Alexander Areshchenko, Loek van Wely, Yuriy Kryvoruchko, Vladimir Akopian, Ivan Sokolov, Gabriel Sargissian, Alexander Onischuk, Sergei Tiviakov, Bassem Amin, Eltaj Safarli, Rauf Mamedov, Ray Robson, Varuzhan Akobian, Georg Meier, Tigran Levonovich Petrosian, Daniel Fridman, Igor Khenkin, Gadir Guseinov, Alexander Ipatov, Erwin L'Ami, Dragan Solak, Mustafa Yilmaz, Vasif Durarbayli, Nidjat Mamedov, David Baramidze, Emre Can, Baris Esen, Samy Shoker, Mohamed Ezat, Khaled Abdel Razik, Ibrahim Hasan Labib

 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 180  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Kamsky vs A Korobov 0-1742013FIDE World Team ChampionshipD00 Queen's Pawn Game
2. V Durarbayli vs B Esen  ½-½742013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB92 Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation
3. A Giri vs Ding Liren  ½-½282013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
4. Wang Yue vs Van Wely  ½-½382013FIDE World Team ChampionshipA37 English, Symmetrical
5. Tiviakov vs Bu Xiangzhi 0-1442013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB22 Sicilian, Alapin
6. Yu Yangyi vs I Sokolov ½-½372013FIDE World Team ChampionshipC45 Scotch Game
7. Ivanchuk vs Nakamura ½-½402013FIDE World Team ChampionshipC49 Four Knights
8. A Moiseenko vs Onischuk  ½-½342013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
9. Akobian vs Y Kryvoruchko  ½-½442013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
10. Kramnik vs Aronian ½-½492013FIDE World Team ChampionshipD44 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
11. Movsesian vs Karjakin  ½-½402013FIDE World Team ChampionshipA07 King's Indian Attack
12. Grischuk vs Akopian ½-½872013FIDE World Team ChampionshipC67 Ruy Lopez
13. G Sargissian vs I Nepomniachtchi  ½-½412013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE60 King's Indian Defense
14. M Yilmaz vs N Mamedov 0-1752013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
15. E Safarli vs D Solak  ½-½602013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB11 Caro-Kann, Two Knights, 3...Bg4
16. A Ipatov vs R Mamedov  ½-½432013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE97 King's Indian
17. B Amin vs D Baramidze 0-1312013FIDE World Team ChampionshipC45 Scotch Game
18. Naiditsch vs S Shoker 0-1502013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB27 Sicilian
19. K Abdel Razik vs G Meier 0-1222013FIDE World Team ChampionshipD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
20. Khenkin vs M Ezat ½-½422013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE90 King's Indian
21. M Ezat vs Movsesian  ½-½932013FIDE World Team ChampionshipE94 King's Indian, Orthodox
22. B Amin vs G Sargissian  ½-½582013FIDE World Team ChampionshipA06 Reti Opening
23. Akopian vs S Shoker  1-0572013FIDE World Team ChampionshipB07 Pirc
24. Khenkin vs A Ipatov  ½-½382013FIDE World Team ChampionshipA40 Queen's Pawn Game
25. N Mamedov vs I Sokolov  1-0442013FIDE World Team ChampionshipC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 180  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 20 OF 20 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I'll admit Anand had a tough run and had to play a lot of matches, as FIDE changed it's cycle. Now that things are stable, they may well increase the WC match length to 16 games, which is how it should be.

Anand finally got the title in his late 30s. It's likely his tournament victories would have dropped whether or not he was world champion. Remember, MC is only 23 years old. He is under no pressure to play ALL of the biggest events, even less so now that he has the title and will generate larger appearance fees. He'll work when he wants to work, and play soccer with his friends when he wants to. I'm glad he is not obsessed with chess and will probably not end up like Bobby Fischer.

Once again, if MC has a plus score against Kjarkan, Grischuk, Nepo, Svidler and Aronian, I don't see how they have the guns to beat him in a match. You mentioned Anand beating Kramnik, though Kramnik probably had a plus score against Vishy. VK was entering chess middle age, and was also battling arthritis, though this was not widely reported in the media. I would say that Anand was very consistent, and when the stars were properly aligned, he made the most of his chances and beat Kramnik.

Carlsen is NOT anywhere near chess middle age and/or burnout, and seems to be in perfect health. His situation vis a vis his peers bears no resemblance to Anand and Kramnik.

Like it or not, MC is going to attack the chess world the way Kasparov did as a young man.

Dec-07-13  BOSTER: <HMM> Your good math statistic is not enough to predict WC Battle even in a couple years.
Dec-08-13  dx9293: <HMM> Where do I begin?

I'll start at the end: only time will tell what Carlsen will do. Personally, I see limitless potential in him, but not a Kasparovian drive to dominate for many years, even assuming he could do it. After defeating Vishy, he said to Nastya Karlovich something like "only in the last year I decided I wanted to become World Champion." If he's telling the truth, and if he's telling the truth when he says he plays because chess is fun and he enjoys it, I DON'T see a very long reign. Because to maintain what he has achieved he will have to work his ass off, and that won't be fun. (Continued)

Dec-08-13  dx9293: Next, you must realize that FIDE isn't going to change much of anything. The last thing they want is another Kasparov (with Western backing to boot). And in many ways I agree with them.

When Kirsan wins re-election next year (and he will), he will keep the status quo "whether you like it or not."

In a vacuum, your other analysis makes sense. But you can bet that all the other top players will do whatever is necessary (teaming up if needed) to stop Magnus and then fight it out amongst themselves. They want a share of his money and glory. "The enemy of my enemy..."

Dec-08-13  donjova: <HeMateMe: Once again, if MC has a plus score against Kjarkan, Grischuk, Nepo, Svidler and Aronian, I don't see how they have the guns to beat him in a match.>

Well, before Alekhine beat Capablanca in a match, he had a minus score against him. Actually, he didn't score a single win against Capa before WC match.

And Carlsen is often compared to Capablanca, on top of that. :)

Dec-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: <Well, before Alekhine beat Capablanca in a match, he had a minus score against him. Actually, he didn't score a single win against Capa before WC match.>

You continue to ignore the facts. It isn't just that MC has a plus score against all of his peers, his tournament results are clearly better. In your above example I doubt very much that Capa's tournament work was significantly better than AAA's. Results were probably comparable. In other words, AAA beating Capa in a title match (by one point) is not the big upset you make it out to be.

You ignore the results. Anand was always just the tip of the iceberg as a world champion, first among equals. His ELO put him outside of the top ten at the time carlsen beat him. Nothing wrong with that. Petrosian, Spassky and Kramnik were in the same position, IMO.

Then, the juggernauts: Karpov, Kasparov and Carlsen. No one touched Karpov or Kasparov for ten and fifteen years, respectively. All of numbers point in the same direction for a long reign by Carlsen.

Dec-08-13  donjova: <HeMateMe:It isn't just that MC has a plus score against all of his peers, his tournament results are clearly better. In your above example I doubt very much that Capa's tournament work was significantly better than AAA's. Results were probably comparable.>

True, Alekhine had very good tournament record. He wanted to win as many tournaments as possible to become the legitimate challenger. Therefore, he avoided playing in tournaments in which Capablanca participated (you can look at the Tournament Index).

<In other words, AAA beating Capa in a title match (by one point) is not the big upset you make it out to be.>

My point is that Alekhine's victory in a match was considered a HUGE upset at the time, at least if the description on this page is correct: Capablanca-Alekhine World Championship Match (1927)

Also, Alekhine won by three points.

Anyway, you are right in one thing: Carlsen has excellent chances for a long reign. That, however, doesn't mean that some of the underdog players can't upset him.

Dec-08-13  Billy Vaughan: Does anybody know how predictive head-to-head results are leading into a match (as opposed to measures of overall results such as Elo)?
Dec-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I would guess they are extremely predictive if: 1) it is only classic chess considered, in individual, FIDE accepted, non-team competitions, and 2) They are gathered for just the five years preceding a match.
Dec-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Is there any chance that it was really Capa ducking Alekhine, because he didn't want to risk losing a game to the greatest threat to his crown?

How do you know who registered first, for various tournaments? Maybe organizers were told by Capa that AAA was not to be invited, when Capa had the title, and the clout that goes along with it?

Dec-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Carlsen doesn't make mistakes. Brutal logic dictates that eventually his opponent will make a mistake: its just a mere matter of time

And when the mistake is made, Carlsen wins and thats that

And since Carlsen has such a wide opening repertoire, its difficult, if not impossible to effect meaningful preparation

In conclusion, an opponent facing Carlsen is best advised to follow Carlsen's very own edict: Don't make mistakes

...and hope for the best

*****

Dec-09-13  donjova: <HeMateMe: Is there any chance that it was really Capa ducking Alekhine, because he didn't want to risk losing a game to the greatest threat to his crown?

How do you know who registered first, for various tournaments? Maybe organizers were told by Capa that AAA was not to be invited, when Capa had the title, and the clout that goes along with it?>

Well, I read about it in Jeremy Silman's article about Alekhine on chess.com: http://www.chess.com/article/view/a...

Anyway, here's the part of interest:
<With the World Championship and nothing but the World Championship on his mind, he mapped out a clear plan: Play against the world’s best and win every tournament, thus showing that he was the true challenger to the title. And, at first he would also avoid Capablanca until he felt he was closer to him in strength.

This strategy was already “on” as far back as 1914 when, before accepting a place in the Mannheim tournament (which he eventually won), he wired the organizers and asked, “Inform me, please, if Capablanca is going to play in the tournament.”

The organizers, who thought that Alekhine wanted to compete against Capablanca, were embarrassed since the Cuban wasn’t going to play. However, Peter Romanovsky, after joining Alekhine in Mannheim right before the event, asked him why he sent that wire. Here is Alekhine’s reply:

“If Capablanca participated, I would not play. I must train for my match against Capablanca in the coming years to become the World Champion and there is a trick. I must win, come in first, in every event. So far, I’m weaker than Capablanca and this means that if he took part I’d come in second. This does not fit my plans.”

Note that as far back as 1914 Alekhine knew that Capablanca would eventually take the title from the aging Lasker. Thus Capablanca was his ultimate target and he never took his eyes off of him.>

Anyway, the point is, when you look at the entire careers of Capablanca and Alekhine, you could say, in hindsight, that Alekhine was the more successful/stronger player, or that they were about equal. But before WC 1927, contemporaries thought that Capablanca was almost invincible. Many are saying the same thing about Carlsen, and time will show if they are right.

Dec-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Does Jeremy Silman have a copy of such wire and is it something that is verifiable, and not something phony spread around on the internet?

Not enough evidence, for me. Alekhine liked money, and the things that came with it. If playing in the biggest tournaments meant getting more money, I think he would have been there.

I'm not sure if there are really all that many big tournaments played, at that time, accessible to both players. Your feeling that AAA ducked Capa, before the match, may be based on circumstantial evidence.

Dec-09-13  donjova: <HeMateMe: Does Jeremy Silman have a copy of such wire and is it something that is verifiable, and not something phony spread around on the internet?>

Don't know, didn't ask him. I only read an interesting article on the internet, with some nice games displayed. :)

<I'm not sure if there are really all that many big tournaments played, at that time, accessible to both players. Your feeling that AAA ducked Capa, before the match, may be based on circumstantial evidence.>

Could be. It could also be that Silman is right. I don't know, and it really isn't crucial for my comparison of Carlsen with Capablanca. Which, again, has nothing to do with FIDE World Team Championship.

I wouldn't want to go further off-topic. Thank you, and have a nice day. :)

Dec-09-13  Kaspablanca: While AAA was the champ he avoided tournament when Capa was playing, he asked the organizers to raise the prize knowing AAA that the organizers wont met his demands, once he lost the title to Euwe then he couldnt ask for raising the prize and played a tournament when Capa was playing, well you know the rest of the history.
Dec-10-13  paavoh: @Billy V: <there's nothing fundamentally wrong with a team that gets kept off the podium by such strong teams as Russia, China, and Ukraine>

Exactly. I guess the main thing is the overall standard of the team. You can not have anyone failing, be it Kamsky here or the lower boards elsewhere.

Dec-10-13  ex0duz: <HMM> Relax mate. You're riding Carlsen too hard.

We haven't even seen him play a tournament while having the pressure of being WC yet. He could lose motivation for all we know. Past statistics don't take this into account. You're talking like Carlsen of the last 3 years will be the same Carlsen of the next 15 years. Maybe he gets a girl, gets a kid, loses motivation, etc. That's all it takes to have a bad run like Radjabov, and someone else might find motivation and dethrone him. Players up and coming like Wei Yi, other Chinese players might take it up full time and find their growth etc, Carlsen can easily be toppled if he takes it for granted. Time will tell if he can remain motivated since he has nothing really left to prove except keep his current form.

Dec-10-13  Absentee: <ex0duz: We haven't even seen him play a tournament while having the pressure of being WC yet>

First it was the pressure of not being world champion, then it was the pressure of playing in a world championship event, then it was the pressure of proving he deserved to be world champion, then it was the pressure of playing the world champion, now it's the pressure of being world champion. Really, is there something that, according to some of our esteemed kibitzers, does NOT put pressure on Carlsen?

Dec-10-13  Billy Vaughan: What's really scary about Carlsen to me is that he said that after game 3, the match felt perfectly fun and normal. Maybe at some point the gravity of being world champion will sink in, but I think it's just as likely that he'll play all his games, for the WCC or otherwise, <without> pressure. Bring it on, you know?
Dec-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Absentee>: Maybe not putting any pressure on Carlsen.

This is straight out of the playbook wherein the hero must be shown to have clay feet after all.

Dec-11-13  ex0duz: <First it was the pressure of not being world champion, then it was the pressure of playing in a world championship event, then it was the pressure of proving he deserved to be world champion, then it was the pressure of playing the world champion, now it's the pressure of being world champion. Really, is there something that, according to some of our esteemed kibitzers, does NOT put pressure on Carlsen?>

Exactly what I said, or was at least thinking before.. maybe he does well 'under' pressure. If that's true, then maybe now that there's no more pressure left on him to win anything(or rather, nothing left for him to prove since he's won every super-tourney, has the highest ELO ever in history, and of course he also now holds WC title), he also will lose some motivation, and maybe that will affect his play. Along with a few other factors i mentioned above, like finding a girlfriend/wife/having kids/enjoying his youth away from chess/stepping away from his fathers shadow etc and moving out perhaps, maybe even to another country/city. Many potential life changes to hopefully put him off so we can have interesting games rather than him just crushing everyone in his rather boring style which I personally don't think is good for the game :P

Before the WC match, he still had that left to look forward to and to win. He still had Anand to overcome. But now? He has nothing, no one. Maybe he will just take it easy now and let others catch up to him since he doesn't really have to do anything now and they are the ones who have to do the hard work to come after him instead of the other way around.

Personally, I don't think Carlsen feels pressure or he isn't really intimidated by anyone. So he has to be his own worst enemy for anyone to stand a chance. It's like Kasparov in his heyday. When he was playing good, no one could beat him. It's this supreme confidence in their ability that made them so good and put them a notch above the rest of the pack.

Dec-11-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Future challengers to Carlsen are set with a difficult task: Preparing for someone who plays all openings from both sides of the board, and while doing so, doesn't make mistakes...
Dec-11-13  Kaspablanca: Carlsen should have a weak point in his game, the problem is that nobody knows what is and is very dificult to find it out.
Dec-11-13  Billy Vaughan: Carlsen has clear limitations, though. He can't go very deep into theoretical opening lines. He rarely gets a big advantage out of the opening with white. His intuition is weaker in chaotic positions. I'm sure somebody who's better at chess than I am can pick out more specific weak points.

Kramnik said once in an interview that Anand has his weaknessesclosed positions, move order finesses, a couple of other nuancesbut getting to these weaknesses is very hard.

The problem isn't that Carlsen has no weaknesses. It's that he covers them up so well.

Dec-11-13  Arcturar: Good post, Billy! I completely agree! Obviously Carlsen is still great at any kind of position; his calculated defence in Game 9 of the Anand-Carlsen match was brilliant, for instance. And all of Carlsen's Nakamura crushes. But yes, for someone like Aronian to beat him they would definately have to steer the game into murky waters. Trying to play Carlsen in "simple" positions is dangerous at best, suicidal at worst.
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