chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
World Chess Championship Candidates Tournament

Viswanathan Anand8.5/14(+3 -0 =11)[view games]
Sergey Karjakin7.5/14(+3 -2 =9)[view games]
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov7/14(+3 -3 =8)[view games]
Vladimir Kramnik7/14(+3 -3 =8)[view games]
Dmitry Andreikin7/14(+2 -2 =10)[view games]
Peter Svidler6.5/14(+3 -4 =7)[view games]
Levon Aronian6.5/14(+3 -4 =7)[view games]
Veselin Topalov6/14(+2 -4 =8)[view games]

 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 56  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Mamedyarov vs Topalov ½-½36 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Anand vs Aronian 1-047 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC88 Ruy Lopez
3. D Andreikin vs Kramnik ½-½32 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
4. Karjakin vs Svidler ½-½26 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesB48 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
5. Kramnik vs Karjakin 1-039 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD20 Queen's Gambit Accepted
6. Svidler vs D Andreikin 1-031 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesB32 Sicilian
7. Topalov vs Anand ½-½54 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesA11 English, Caro-Kann Defensive System
8. Aronian vs Mamedyarov 1-044 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
9. D Andreikin vs Karjakin ½-½30 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
10. Mamedyarov vs Anand 0-131 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
11. Topalov vs Aronian ½-½35 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
12. Svidler vs Kramnik ½-½51 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesA35 English, Symmetrical
13. Anand vs Kramnik ½-½30 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
14. Mamedyarov vs D Andreikin 1-042 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
15. Karjakin vs Topalov ½-½40 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
16. Aronian vs Svidler 1-057 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD85 Grunfeld
17. Kramnik vs Aronian ½-½60 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesE10 Queen's Pawn Game
18. Svidler vs Topalov 1-048 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC78 Ruy Lopez
19. Karjakin vs Mamedyarov ½-½31 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
20. D Andreikin vs Anand ½-½42 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
21. Anand vs Karjakin ½-½33 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesC67 Ruy Lopez
22. Aronian vs D Andreikin ½-½48 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesA11 English, Caro-Kann Defensive System
23. Topalov vs Kramnik 1-041 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
24. Mamedyarov vs Svidler 1-031 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesA81 Dutch
25. Kramnik vs Mamedyarov 1-054 2014 World Chess Championship CandidatesD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 56  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 221 OF 221 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-26-14  positionalgenius: Narrowing down just three players would be incredibly difficult, especially if one is trying to be objective. We can certainly assume that Kramnik and Anand belong in the discussion with all they've done. It's a shame Kasparov didn't play Anand when the former truly entered his prime. ( 2007-?)
Apr-26-14  Lambda: Narrowing it down to two or four players would be difficult. But three players looks pretty easy to me, since there are precisely three players who dominated their eras for long periods of time, precisely three players with long strings of both tournament and world championship successes, and precisely three players who produced 2800+ Chessmetrics performances which don't even seem remarkable for them. Lasker, Karpov and Kasparov seem to be pretty clearly separated from everyone else to me.
May-06-14  Mr 1100: I've been reading about some of the politics within the world of top-level professional chess, particularly during the Kasparov era...

Leads me to the conclusion that the tournament format would be the fairest way to decide the world championship.

May-06-14  1971: <positionalgenius> I say Anand's prime is '04-'08.
May-06-14  Rama: Well, they say over on Chessbase that FIDE has received NO BIDS for the championship. (The bidding deadline just passed.)

Y ahora que?

May-06-14  Petrosianic: <Kinghunt>: <I think this story, as often as it's repeated, is apocryphal.>

Well, I read it straight out of <Chess Life>. So if it's untrue, it's not apocryphal, it's shoddy reporting.

May-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  norami: < Rama> Not true - I submitted a bid. Guaranteed prize fund of ten thousand dollars, plus Magnus and Vishy could stay with me - one in the guest bedroom , the other on the living room couch. Also I would provide milk and cookies.
May-06-14  Mr 1100: Just out of curiosity - what was the largest top-level round robin tournament within the last 30 years?
May-06-14  Nerwal: <Just out of curiosity - what was the largest top-level round robin tournament within the last 30 years?>

Not sure - but the GMA World Cup events in 1988-89 were RR tournaments with 16 to 18 players. Fields tend to become narrower with time.

Maybe we can also count the 1988 USSR championship, since it was really top-level at the time.

May-06-14  Petrosianic: Depends what you call top level. There was some monster tournament in Indonesia in the 80's. Something like a 30 player single round-robin. Was it top level? I don't remember, but it was the biggest round robin I've ever seen.
May-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kinghunt: <Petrosianic: <Kinghunt>: <I think this story, as often as it's repeated, is apocryphal.>

Well, I read it straight out of <Chess Life>. So if it's untrue, it's not apocryphal, it's shoddy reporting.>

To the contrary, that is the very definition of the word. <a·poc·ry·phal: of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true>

May-06-14  Petrosianic: Yes, but Chess Life reported it as a factual news story with no element of doubt. And they got it at the time from the people who got it passed. If it's not true, it's very shoddy reporting. Either they were lied to and didn't check it out, or they lied themselves.

To me it seems more likely that the story is basically true, but wrong in some detail (maybe they got the resolution number wrong, maybe it wasn't a House Resolution at all, but something else, or so on. I heard that people were trying to do this before it happened. Then it was announced that it had been done. It doesn't seem likely to me that they tried and failed, then lied about it and claimed to have succeeded. People would have known.

May-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Kinghunt,

"There does not appear to be any government record of such a resolution."

Is this what you are looking for.

It certainly made it to table.

"A joint resolution recognizing Bobby Fisher as the official World Chess Champion."

H.J.RES.545

It was posted in 1986.

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdque...::

Wow! just tested that link and was told I've times out!!!

"Your Search Has Timed Out"

pasted link in another tab and it worked.

just grabbed and pasted what I could. (before I get timed out again)

46. H.J.RES.545 : A joint resolution recognizing Bobby Fisher as the official World Chess Champion. Sponsor: Rep Pashayan, Charles, Jr. [CA-17] (introduced 2/27/1986) Cosponsors (None) Committees: House Post Office and Civil Service; Senate Judiciary Latest Major Action: 3/14/1986 Referred to Senate committee. Status: Received in the Senate and read twice and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

May-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Cannot get it back - Anybody getting any luck with the link.

If not paste this into Google:

------

46. H.J.RES.545 : A joint resolution recognizing Bobby Fisher as the official World Chess Champion

----
top hit will take you to the page - look for item No.8.

May-09-14  Chessinfinite: If anyone is up for a fun trivia, then i have a question -

" Out of all the players that ever contested for a Official World Title, 30 in total, what do the 3 players - Chigorin, Anand and Topalov have in common that the others, the rest 27, do not ? "

Nice if anyone can guess it, if not i can give a clue later..

May-09-14  Petrosianic: This isn't going to tie in to that old trolling argument that Tchigorin was world champion because Steinitz resigned his title right after beating Tchigorin the first time but before beating him the second time and the second match wasn't really a title match, et cetera, is it?
May-09-14  Chessinfinite: <Petrosianic> Thanks for a response.

No it does not have anything to do with that- actually the reason for the second Chigorin match can be ignored for this answer, which to be honest i was not aware of.

Please ignore that all title matches outside the chess arena- meaning political etc can be ignored. Steinitz and Chigorin played 2 world title matches for this questions. Thanks

May-09-14  Chessinfinite: Petrosianic, that was a nice hit, i think you may be quite close to the answer :) You may also ignore FIDE KO matches such as Anand-Karpov , Anand - Shirov etc.

I consider the PCA matches played between Kasparov, Short, Anand as legitimate for the official world title. Please ignore all rival matches played between Karpov - Timman, Karpov- Kamsky in the 90s. The last match Karpov played was his last match against Kasparov in 1990 for this question.

Clue: If you include The rival FIDE matches held during the 90s, then Karpov can also be added in that group of 3, it can be argued, though it gets complicated - Actually it is best to ignore all Karpov matches starting from the Timman match. Nice catch !

May-09-14  Petrosianic: Occasionally, I've heard people argue that Steinitz gave up the title, Tchigorin won it at New York 1889, and that Steinitz-Tchigorin 1892 wasn't a title match. The idea was that Tchigorin was Steinitz's successor despite losing the two matches to him.

I've only heard this idea from 1 or 2 people, who pretended to have no idea that there was anything controversial about it, and seemed to think that everyone regarded it the same way, even though they had no sources for it (which is why I called it a trolling argument).

May-09-14  Chessinfinite: That is very strange about Chigorin and Steinitz. Without wanting to disclose too much for the moment, i will just say that for this question, Steinitz played 6 world title matches from 1886- 1896.
May-10-14  Chessinfinite: The answer :)

"Those 3 are the only players who do not have a continuous world title cycle matches in all their title matches played - someone else played a world title match in between any two World title matches played ever played by Chigorin, Anand , Topalov. "

Between two of Chigorin's matches against Steinitz, there was a world championship match between Steinitz and Gunsberg in 1890, for Anand there was the match in 95 vs Kasparov and a long gap before 2008 match with Kramnik, for Topalov there was a match played in 2008 (Anand v Kramnik) between his two title matches in 2006 (vs Kramnik) and 2010 (vs Anand) . None of the other players had a 'break' in the middle of all of their matches played for world title, including of course those with just one match played !

Petrosianic almost got it, if the Gunsberg match was considered as a world title match and in view of the reasons, it is possible that it was missed ! Very close !

Sep-22-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: Compare this Candidates tournament with the original ones:

Budapest Candidates (1950)

1 Bronstein ** ½½ 01 ½1 11 1½ 01 ½½ 1½ ½1 12.0/18
2 Boleslavsky ½½ ** 1½ ½½ ½½ 1½ ½½ ½1 ½1 11 12.0/18
3 Smyslov 10 0½ ** ½½ 1½ ½1 01 ½1 ½½ ½½ 10.0/18
4 Keres ½0 ½½ ½½ ** ½½ 10 1½ ½½ ½1 ½½ 9.5/18
5 Najdorf 00 ½½ 0½ ½½ ** ½½ ½½ 11 ½1 ½½ 9.0/18
6 Kotov 0½ 0½ ½0 01 ½½ ** ½1 10 10 1½ 8.5/18
7 Stahlberg 10 ½½ 10 0½ ½½ ½0 ** ½½ ½½ ½½ 8.0/18
8 Lilienthal ½½ ½0 ½0 ½½ 00 01 ½½ ** 10 ½½ 7.0/18
9 Szabo 0½ ½0 ½½ ½0 ½0 01 ½½ 01 ** 10 7.0/18
10 Flohr ½0 00 ½½ ½½ ½½ 0½ ½½ ½½ 01 ** 7.0/18

Zurich Candidates (1953)

1 Vasily Smyslov ** ½½ ½1 11 ½½ ½½ 11 ½0 ½½ ½½ ½½ ½½ 1½ 11 1½ 18.0 2 David Bronstein ½½ ** 11 1½ ½½ ½½ ½0 ½½ 1½ ½½ ½½ 01 1½ ½½ ½½ 16.0 3 Samuel Reshevsky ½0 00 ** ½½ ½½ ½½ ½½ 10 ½½ ½1 ½1 1½ ½1 11 1½ 16.0 4 Paul Keres 00 0½ ½½ ** ½1 ½½ ½1 ½½ ½½ 0½ 11 1½ ½1 ½½ 11 16.0 5 Tigran Petrosian ½½ ½½ ½½ ½0 ** 0½ ½½ ½½ 00 ½½ ½½ 11 ½1 1½ 11 15.0 6 Miguel Najdorf ½½ ½½ ½½ ½½ 1½ ** 00 1½ 1½ ½0 ½½ ½½ ½½ 0½ 11 14.5 7 Efim Geller 00 ½1 ½½ ½0 ½½ 11 ** ½0 01 ½½ 01 1½ ½1 01 ½½ 14.5 8 Alexander Kotov ½1 ½½ 01 ½½ ½½ 0½ ½1 ** 10 1½ 00 10 1½ 0½ 01 14.0 9 Mark Taimanov ½½ 0½ ½½ ½½ 11 0½ 10 01 ** 10 ½½ ½½ ½0 0½ 11 14.0 10 Yuri Averbakh ½½ ½½ ½0 1½ ½½ ½1 ½½ 0½ 01 ** ½½ ½½ 0½ 11 00 13.5 11 Isaac Boleslavsky ½½ ½½ ½0 00 ½½ ½½ 10 11 ½½ ½½ ** ½0 ½½ ½1 ½½ 13.5 12 Laszlo Szabo ½½ 10 0½ 0½ 00 ½½ 0½ 01 ½½ ½½ ½1 ** 1½ ½½ 1½ 13.0 13 Svetozar Gligoric 0½ 0½ ½0 ½0 ½0 ½½ ½0 0½ ½1 1½ ½½ 0½ ** ½1 11 12.5 14 Max Euwe 00 ½½ 00 ½½ 0½ 1½ 10 1½ 1½ 00 ½0 ½½ ½0 ** 1½ 11.5 15 Gideon Stahlberg 0½ ½½ 0½ 00 00 00 ½½ 10 00 11 ½½ 0½ 00 0½ ** 8.0

Amsterdam Candidates (1956)

1 Smyslov ** ½½ ½½ 0½ ½½ ½1 11 ½1 1½ ½1 11½ 5000 2 Keres ½½ ** ½½ ½½ ½½ ½1 ½½ ½0 1½ 1½ 10 3500 =3 Szabó ½½ ½½ ** 1½ ½½ ½½ ½1 0½ ½½ 01 9½ 1310 =3 Spassky 1½ ½½ 0½ ** ½½ ½1 0½ ½½ ½½ ½1 9½ 1310 =3 Petrosian ½½ ½½ ½½ ½½ ** 0½ 01 1½ ½½ 1½ 9½ 1310 =3 Bronstein ½0 ½0 ½½ ½0 1½ ** ½1 1½ ½½ ½1 9½ 1310 =3 Geller 00 ½½ ½0 1½ 10 ½0 ** 11 ½1 1½ 9½ 1310 =8 Filip ½0 ½1 1½ ½½ 0½ 0½ 00 ** 10 ½1 8 650 =8 Panno 0½ 0½ ½½ ½½ ½½ ½½ ½0 01 ** 1½ 8 650 10 Pilnik ½0 0½ 10 ½0 0½ ½0 0½ 0½ 0½ ** 5 500

Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959)

1.Tal XXXX 0010 ==== 01=1 1111 1=11 111= 111= 20 2.Keres 1101 XXXX 0=== 1==0 0101 ==11 1110 1111 18.5 3.Petrosian ==== 1=== XXXX ==0= 11== 0==1 100= =11= 15.5 4.Smyslov 10=0 0==1 ==1= XXXX ==10 0=10 =1=1 =011 15 5.Fischer 0000 1010 00== ==01 XXXX 10=1 ==10 =1=1 12.5 6.Gligoric 0=00 ==00 1==0 1=01 01== XXXX ==10 =1== 12.5 7.Olafsson 000= 0001 011= =0=0 10=0 ==01 XXXX 00=1 10 8.Benko 000= 0000 =00= =100 =0=0 =0== 11=0 XXXX 8

Curacao Candidates (1962)

1.Petrosian XXXX ==== ==== =1== ==11 ==1= 11=* =11= 17.5 2.Keres ==== XXXX ==== 0=1= ==1= 1110 1=1* =11= 17 3.Geller ==== ==== XXXX 11=0 ==1= ===1 =11* =11= 17 4.Fischer =0== 1=0= 00=1 XXXX 010= 01=1 =1=* 1=1= 14 5.Korchnoi ==00 ==0= ==0= 101= XXXX ===0 10=* 1111 13.5 6.Benko ==0= 0001 ===0 10=0 ===1 XXXX 10=* 011= 12 7.Tal 00=* 0=0* =00* =0=* 01=* 01=* XXXX 10=* 7 8.Filip =00= =00= =00= 0=0= 0000 100= 01=* XXXX 7

The old ones were a lot longer. The players look to me just as tough as the ones now. Any one has any speculation on how Anand, Karjakin, Mamedyarov, Kramnik, Andreikin, Svidler, Aronian, Topalov might do in such company in such a marathon tournament format?

Two players immediately stand out IMO. Smyslov wins 2 out of 4. Keres not only is the only one to qualify and play in all of them, he takes second place 4 out of 5 times!

Oct-10-14  jphamlore: The real chess tragedy apart from Nakamura this event may be Mamedyarov. After all, the event is being held in Baku and Mamedyarov was good enough in the last FIDE Grand Prix cycle to qualify for Candidates 2014.

But as Candidates 2014 showed, Mamedyarov's defense as Black to 1. d4 has simply collapsed. He simply can't find anything to play that can reliably draw. He's tried just about everything in his career. And it's killing him this event as well.

Karjakin as a 1. e4 opener has used that mostly against Mamedyarov for indifferent results, including Candidates 2014. But Karjakin has shown more variety this event. This may be the time for Karjakin to try 1. d4 as White.

Oct-10-14  Troller: <The real chess tragedy apart from Nakamura this event may be Mamedyarov. After all, the event is being held in Baku...>

This is an interesting point and has some relevance for the ongoing GP tournament also in Baku. In fact Sutovsky, another strong Baku GM, opined that Mamedyarov would be affected negatively by playing in his home city. Mamed has of course a history of nervousness - often falling apart in the games following a loss - but he seems to have improved in this respect recently. However, (according to Sutovsky) Mamedyarov has a great awareness of his fans which in turn triggers his old nervousness when fans are closely following him, as they will do in Baku.

Oct-10-14  jphamlore: <Troller: This is an interesting point and has some relevance for the ongoing GP tournament also in Baku. In fact Sutovsky, another strong Baku GM, opined that Mamedyarov would be affected negatively by playing in his home city. Mamed has of course a history of nervousness - often falling apart in the games following a loss - but he seems to have improved in this respect recently. However, (according to Sutovsky) Mamedyarov has a great awareness of his fans which in turn triggers his old nervousness when fans are closely following him, as they will do in Baku.>

That would be highly unfortunate if Mamedyarov plays worse in Baku than elsewhere because Baku is always a potential bidder for a Candidates tournament or even to host a World Championship match if Mamedyarov were to benefit by being a potential player, particularly if hosting a Candidates tournament would allow Baku to select Mamedyarov as the sponsor's choice.

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 221)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 221 OF 221 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies