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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess Club Tournament

David Janowski14.5/15(+14 -0 =1)[games]
William M De Visser0.5/1(+0 -0 =1)[games]
F Muller von der Werra0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Samuel Lipschutz0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Eugene Delmar0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Edward Hymes0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Charles B Isaacson0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Philip Richardson0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Oviedo Mesick Bostwick0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
David Graham Baird0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Gustave Simonson0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Louis Schmidt0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Gustav Henschel Koehler0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Alexander Schroeter0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
James Moore Hanham0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]
Albert Hodges0/1(+0 -1 =0)[games]

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess Club (1899)
In January, 1899, after the conclusion of Janowski - Showalter Match 1 (1898) and Janowski - Marshall, Match 1 (1899), David Janowski began a series of one-on-one exhibition games against the top players of the Manhattan Chess Club. The New York Sun for Sunday, January 22, 1899 reported:

"Janowski will begin playing his series of fourteen games against the first-class players of the Manhattan Chess Club tomorrow evening. For the week the schedule will be as follows: Monday at 8 o'clock, L. Schmidt, ex-champion of the club; Tuesday evening, Phil Richardson; Wednesday evening, Dr. Isaacson; Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Major Hanham; and on Friday evening the well-known amateur Schroeter."

The time limit was twenty moves an hour, though this could be changed on request and does not appear to have been strictly enforced in any event. A toss for color was made at the beginning of each game.

Eventually fifteen games were played from January 23 to February 7, with Janowski conceding only one draw in the series.

Game 1, Monday, January 23. Janowski 1 Schmidt

"The first of a series of fourteen games on even terms between Janowski and the crack players of the Manhattan Chess Club was decided at the clubrooms last evening, when ex-champion Louis Schmidt was pitted against the Parisian. According to arrangements the games are to be played at a time limit of twenty moves an hour, but by request of Schmidt the time limit in this case was agreed upon to forty moves in two hours. Janowski won the toss and selected the white pieces. The local player adopted the Dutch Defence against P-Q4, a defence which is not much liked by experts. In fact Tarrasch, upon one occasion, condemned it as weak. As early as the tenth move White began pressing his plan, and eventually won a pawn. Later on black sacrificed a piece for two pawns for the attack, but Janowski's twenty-fourth move settled the game, for one move later Schmidt resigned, as he could not any further prevent the threatening mate."

Report: New York Sun, January 24, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 24, 1899
Times: 20 moves: 0:25-1:50; Final: 0:30-1:51

Game 2, Tuesday, January 24. Richardson 0 Janowski

"Janowski, the Parisian chess player, was pitted against Philip Richardson, the Brooklyn expert and an honorary member of the Manhattan Chess Club, at the rooms of the latter club, on Tuesday night. It was the second game of the series of fourteen which Janowski will have to play on even terms. After sixty-two moves Richardson resigned early yesterday morning."

Report: New York Sun, January 26, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 26, 1899
Times: Final: 2:44-1:56

Game 3, Wednesday, January 25. Janowski 1 Isaacson

"In the third game Dr. Isaacson met Janowski. The latter opened with the Ruy Lopez. Isaacson selected a weak defence, names ...QPXB,. He soon lost the exchange and after his twenty-first move was mated."

Report: New York Sun, January 26, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 26, 1899
Times: Final: Move 20, 0:19-0:15; Final, 0:20-0:16

Game 4, Thursday, January 26. Janowski 1 Hanham

"Major Hanham was Janowski's opponent yesterday afternoon at the Manhattan Chess Club. The latter won the toss and opened with the Spanish attack, to which Hanham selected the Berliner Defense. All went well in the opening, but later on Janowski got the pull and won a pretty game after thirty-four moves.

Report: New York Sun, January 27, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 27, 1899
Times: Final: Move 20, 0:39-0:41; Final, 1;05-1:12

Game 5, Friday, January 27: Schroeter 0 Janowski

"Janowski met the well-known Munich artist, Schroeter, last night at the Manhattan Chess Club. Schroeter won the toss and offered a queen's pawn opening. He moved rapidly, played cleverly, and after the sacrifice of a rook got into a position that would have insured him a draw. He was not content with this, however, and although he won a bishop later on he resigned after forty-five moves."

Report: New York Sun, January 28, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 29, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:07-0:44; Final, 0:21-1:45

Game 6, Sunday, January 29: Janowski 1 Delmar

"The sixth game of the 14th to be played between Janowski and members of the Manhattan Chess Club was decided yesterday afternoon. Eugene Delmar was the Parisian's opponent. On losing the toss for the move, Mr. Delmar adopted a French Defence in answer to Janowski's P-K4. The game was rather interesting from the start, and after black's fifteenth move, P-K4, it seemed it seemed as if the local player had the superior position. This he maintained up the twenty-eighth move, when he allowed Janowski to proceed with a fine combination, which led to Delmar's resignation after thirty-four moves."

Report: New York Sun, January 30, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 30, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:36-0:21; Final, 1:18-1:05

Game 7, Monday, January 30. Van der Werra 0 Janowski

"Muller Van Der Werra was the seventh of the Manhattan Chess Club who tried conclusions with the Parisian player, Janowski, at the clubrooms yesterday evening. Van Der Werra won the toss, and on opening with P-K4 the Parisian adopted the Sicilian Defence. Pieces were freely exchanged, and even the queens went off the board, but black managed to isolate his adversary's queen's pawn, and he also had the advantage of remaining with two bishops against bishop and knight for the end game. Eventually Janowski won a pawn, and after fifty moves Van Der Werra resigned."

Report: New York Sun, January 31, 1899
Score: New York Sun, January 31, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:48-0:12; Move 40, 1:56-0:27; Final, 2:07-0:29

Game 8, Tuesday, January 31: Janowski 1 Bostwick

"Janowski contested the eighth game of the series against the crack players of the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday afternoon when the young and talented member, O. M. Bostwick, met the Parisian. The latter won the toss, and, on opening with P-K4, black adopted the French Defence as second player. Both contestants deviated from the book moves as early as on the seventh move, but while white seemed to be able to freely develop his pieces black got into a very cramped position. Although the latter made no palpable error, either in the opening or middle stages of the game, the Parisian quietly pressed his attack without gaining in material. Beginning with 20.P-KKt4 white had his plan well made, and in spite of the fact that Bostwick seemed to make the best move whenever it was his turn to play, all the experts present saw an early finish of the game in favor of Janowski. Black now took the king's bishop's pawn, whereupon the Parisian announced a mate in five moves, beginning with RxPch."

Report: New York Sun, February 1, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 1, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:07-0:44; Final, 0:21-1:45

Game 9, Wednesday, February 1: Janowski 1 D. G. Baird

"D. G Baird contested his game of the series of fourteen against Janowski at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday. The latter won the toss, and Baird selected the Petroff's Defence. This opening, however, was at once transformed into a regular Four Knights Game by the contestants. The opening and middle game stages became highly interesting, as the <partie> was played on rather novel lines. After about fifteen moves Janowski began an attack on the king side., when his adversary had castled. Little by little he managed to block Baird's position, and with his twenty-fourth P-Kt4 it there seemed as if there was no satisfactory defence for black, inasmuch as he could not possibly prevent the threatening advance of his opponent's pawns, However, Baird fought on gamely up to his thirty-eighth move, but had to resign after the rejoinder of white. Janowski played the game with very fine judgment throughout."

Report: New York Sun, February 2, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 2, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:23-0:55; Final, 0:37-1:49

Game 10, Thursday, February 2: Janowski 1/2 De Visser

"The tenth game of the series of fourteen was played by Janowski against William de Visser at the Manhattan Chess Club last evening. The Parisian won the toss, and on opening with P-K4 de Visser selected the Sicilian Defence. White at once introduced novel features into the opening, which made matters rather complicated shortly after the start. A sensation followed after Janowski gave up a knight after his eighth move, for not one of the experts presents could understand this procedure. De Visser took the knight and interesting developments were looked for. It must be added, however, that black had to forego the right of castling, as he had moved his king on his seventh move. Minus the piece white tried some very ingenious schemes to press the attack, but up to the twenty-third move the defence was very good, and De Visser maintained his numerical advantage. At his next turn black started aggressive movements on the queen's side of the board. Later on De Visser lost his bishop, and after fifty moves the game was drawn."

Report: New York Sun, Friday, February 3, 1899
Score: New York Sun, Sunday, February 5, 1899
Times: Move 20: 0:38-1:01; Move 40, 1:05-1:52; Final, 1:15-1:58

Game 11: Friday, February 3: Koehler 0 Janowski

"Gus Koehler, the State champion, met Janowski in the eleventh game of the series of fourteen at the Manhattan Chess Club last night. The former won the toss for move, and in reply to P-K4 the Parisian adopted the Sicilian Defence. White continued with the variation 6.K Kt-Kt 5, a continuation which Janowski adopted against De Visser. Nothing in particular happened until the thirteenth move of black, when Janowski took a knight with his king, thereby foregoing the right of castling. A few moves later while overlooked a rather simple combination which lost him his valuable king's pawn. Soon after this contretemps black began advancing his pawns on the king's side and centre of the board, and it became them only a matter of time for the Parisian to win the game, for he had established two joined pawns on the king's and queen's files, Finally, Koehler lost the exchanges and after forty-one moves the game."

Report: New York Sun, February 4, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 4, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:55-0:25; Move 40, 1:54-0:43; Final, 1:56-0L46

Game 12, Saturday, February 4, 1899: Janowski 1 Simonson

"Gus Simonson was Janowski's opponent in the twelfth game of the series, played at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday afternoon. The Parisian offered a Queen's Gambit, which Black declined to accept. The latter castled on his sixth move, while White left his king on his original square, and very soon he began an attack on the king's side. At first Simonson defended pretty cleverly, but after twenty moves it seemed as if Janowski would succeed with his aggression tactics, having secured an open file for the rook, while his queen was also well placed for action. Only three moves later Black took a pawn with his queen, and after the Parisian had a forced win, so Simonson resigned after the thirtieth move of White."

Report: New York Sun, February 5, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 5, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:15-0:51; Final, 0:31-1:33

Game 13, Sunday, February 5, 1899. Lipschutz 0 Janowski

"Play in the series of exhibition games between Janowski and members of the Manhattan Chess Club was resumed yesterday afternoon, when the noted local crack Lipschutz was scheduled to meet the Parisian. This context created unusual excitement, and at times nearly fifty amateurs were following the progress of the game. Lipschutz won the toss and selected the Queen's Gambit, which Janowski declined to accept. The opening moves were made rapidly and on lines well known to experts. White maintained the attack to the seventeenth move, when he threatened to capture the queen's rook's pawn. Black's rejoinder, 17...B-B3, still left that piece to be taken, but a glance at the board showed that Lipschutz could not get it, as 18...R-R would have won the queen. A few moves later, black became aggressive by pushing his queen's pawn to its fifth square. He then threatened to take the rook and also exchange the knight for bishop with good chances of an attack. White took a long time considering his answer. When it came it was found that he had temporarily given up his knight and won a pawn. This seemed at the time to be a superior position. However, the spectators were treated to a fine bit of strategy on the part of Janowski. He obtained a passed queen's pawn, which he which he advanced to the seventh square, and by good play won a rook. Then Lipschutz resigned."

Report: New York Sun, February 6, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 5, 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:38-0:28; Final, 1:17-0:38

Game 14, Monday, February 6, 1899: Hodges 0 Janowski

"A. B. Hodges, the well-known local chess player, met Janowski in the fourteenth game of the series at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday. Considering the Hodges is a likely winner of the championship tournament now in progress at the club, there was a large attendance of members and their friends. Hodges won the toss, and in reply to P-K4 black adopted the Sicilian Defence. Janowski compelled Hodges to resign after thirty-seven moves.."

Report: New York Sun, February 7, 1899
Score: New York Sun, February 7 1899
Times: Move 20, 0:41-0:25; Final, 1:59-0:46

Game 15, Tuesday, February 7, 1899: Hymes 0 Janowski

Throughout, the series had been advertised as being of 14 games. Then, in a note following the score of the Hodges game, The Sun announced that "Janowski will play Eddie Hymes tonight." However, the game was not printed in The Sun or other contemporary newspapers I have searched. The game was described in the American Chess Magazine, and there is a score available that matches the description. A contemporary copy of the score would be welcome.

Report: Am. Chess Magazine, March 1899, p. 395
Score: http://www.365chess.com/game.php?gi...

Articles in the New York Sun covering this match were accessed through the Library of Congress' Chronicling America site at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/. I have compared the scores in The Sun with those available at http://www.365chess.com/tournaments...

 page 1 of 1; 15 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Janowski vs Louis Schmidt 1-0251899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubA85 Dutch, with c4 & Nc3
2. P Richardson vs Janowski 0-1621899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC67 Ruy Lopez
3. Janowski vs C B Isaacson 1-0221899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC67 Ruy Lopez
4. Janowski vs J M Hanham 1-0341899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC67 Ruy Lopez
5. A Schroeter vs Janowski 0-1451899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubD00 Queen's Pawn Game
6. Janowski vs E Delmar 1-0341899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC10 French
7. F M von der Werra vs Janowski 0-1501899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubB40 Sicilian
8. Janowski vs O M Bostwick  1-0401899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC14 French, Classical
9. Janowski vs D G Baird  1-0391899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubC49 Four Knights
10. Janowski vs W M De Visser ½-½501899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubB45 Sicilian, Taimanov
11. G H Koehler vs Janowski  0-1411899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubB45 Sicilian, Taimanov
12. Janowski vs G Simonson 1-0301899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. Lipschutz vs Janowski  0-1321899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
14. A Hodges vs Janowski  0-1371899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubB40 Sicilian
15. E Hymes vs Janowski  0-1511899Janowski Exhibition Series at Manhattan Chess ClubB40 Sicilian
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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