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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Norway Chess Tournament

Sergey Karjakin6/9(+4 -1 =4)[games]
Magnus Carlsen5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Alexander Grischuk5/9(+3 -2 =4)[games]
Veselin Topalov4.5/9(+2 -2 =5)[games]
Fabiano Caruana4.5/9(+2 -2 =5)[games]
Anish Giri4/9(+1 -2 =6)[games]
Levon Aronian4/9(+1 -2 =6)[games]
Vladimir Kramnik4/9(+2 -3 =4)[games]
Peter Svidler4/9(+0 -1 =8)[games]
Simen Agdestein3.5/9(+0 -2 =7)[games]

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Karjakin vs Topalov ½-½482014Norway Chess TournamentE10 Queen's Pawn Game
2. Svidler vs Kramnik  ½-½402014Norway Chess TournamentA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
3. Aronian vs S Agdestein ½-½412014Norway Chess TournamentE15 Queen's Indian
4. Carlsen vs A Giri ½-½322014Norway Chess TournamentA34 English, Symmetrical
5. Grischuk vs Caruana 0-1392014Norway Chess TournamentA62 Benoni, Fianchetto Variation
6. Topalov vs Grischuk 0-1362014Norway Chess TournamentB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
7. S Agdestein vs A Giri ½-½362014Norway Chess TournamentD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
8. Kramnik vs Carlsen ½-½602014Norway Chess TournamentE00 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Aronian vs Karjakin 1-0552014Norway Chess TournamentE15 Queen's Indian
10. Caruana vs Svidler 1-0392014Norway Chess TournamentB48 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
11. A Giri vs Kramnik 0-1432014Norway Chess TournamentE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
12. Karjakin vs S Agdestein ½-½632014Norway Chess TournamentC11 French
13. Svidler vs Topalov  ½-½422014Norway Chess TournamentB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
14. Grischuk vs Aronian 1-0402014Norway Chess TournamentA18 English, Mikenas-Carls
15. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½672014Norway Chess TournamentD70 Neo-Grunfeld Defense
16. Karjakin vs Grischuk 1-0542014Norway Chess TournamentD85 Grunfeld
17. S Agdestein vs Kramnik  ½-½452014Norway Chess TournamentE54 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System
18. Aronian vs Svidler ½-½412014Norway Chess TournamentD85 Grunfeld
19. Topalov vs Carlsen ½-½282014Norway Chess TournamentD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
20. Caruana vs A Giri ½-½532014Norway Chess TournamentA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
21. Grischuk vs S Agdestein ½-½492014Norway Chess TournamentC11 French
22. Carlsen vs Aronian 1-0932014Norway Chess TournamentD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
23. A Giri vs Topalov 1-0432014Norway Chess TournamentB67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
24. Svidler vs Karjakin  ½-½382014Norway Chess TournamentA35 English, Symmetrical
25. Kramnik vs Caruana 1-0522014Norway Chess TournamentE60 King's Indian Defense
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 74 OF 74 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Kanatahodets> You were brought up in a totalitarian regime? In the United States you mean?

I think that despite such a devastating experience you could still perhaps keep your reading going.

Or take up a hobby or an interest of some kind.

Jun-16-14  torrefan: Maybe he meant the US under the teetotalitarian regime during the Prohibition. It was indeed very hard to read novels without a drink of some kind.
Jun-16-14  Kanatahodets: <Richard Taylor: <Kanatahodets> You were brought up in a totalitarian regime? In the United States you mean? I think that despite such a devastating experience you could still perhaps keep your reading going.

Or take up a hobby or an interest of some kind.> Nope not USA, its alter ego of 60s:)

Jun-16-14  Kanatahodets: <torrefan: Maybe he meant the US under the teetotalitarian regime during the Prohibition. It was indeed very hard to read novels without a drink of some kind.> That's a great compliment! But unfortunately I am not so old. Secondly, RT had in mind USA now. It's debatable but it has its point, I agree.
Jun-16-14  Conrad93: <To learn to use the word <entail> correctly does not entail much effort.>

I have been using the word <entail> for at least 8 years now, but thank you for the unneeded advice.

Jun-16-14  Refused: <Conrad93: There is a huge difference between being "knowledgeable" about a subject and being an "expert." While a study of linguistics will help you understand the nature and history of a language, it does not entail that you will become an expert on foreign grammar. Noam Chomsky is an expert in linguistics, but last time I checked he isn't an expert in Chinese or Russian, nor is he fluent in those languages.>

I am glad you are the one to define expert levels. Now we all know how your claim tobe an epert in ten languages is to be understood. But maybe I am being unjust here, and English is not among those ten languages.

And it also explains, how you consider yourself an expert of chess, despite your apparent lack of knowledge. Though, there it is less knowledge but more understanding that is amiss.

<I have been using the word <entail> for at least 8 years now, but thank you for the unneeded advice.>

So, when will you start to use it correctly?

Jun-16-14  Conrad93: I am using it correctly.

en·tail
verb
enˈtāl/
1. involve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence. "a situation that entails considerable risks"
synonyms: involve, necessitate, require, need, demand,...

How was it not used correctly?

Jun-16-14  Conrad93: <<Conrad93: There is a huge difference between being "knowledgeable" about a subject and being an "expert." While a study of linguistics will help you understand the nature and history of a language, it does not entail that you will become an expert on foreign grammar. Noam Chomsky is an expert in linguistics, but last time I checked he isn't an expert in Chinese or Russian, nor is he fluent in those languages.> I am glad you are the one to define expert levels. Now we all know how your claim tobe an epert in ten languages is to be understood. But maybe I am being unjust here, and English is not among those ten languages.

And it also explains, how you consider yourself an expert of chess, despite your apparent lack of knowledge. Though, there it is less knowledge but more understanding that is amiss.

<I have been using the word <entail> for at least 8 years now, but thank you for the unneeded advice.>

So, when will you start to use it correctly?>

Depends on how you define "expert."

Even some GM's are not experts in certain opening lines.

Not all are experts in the endgame either.

When it comes to the Traxler Gambit, the French Defense, and the King's Gambit I do consider myself an expert, since I know more about these openings then most 2000-2300+ rated players.

Jun-16-14  Conrad93: I have more books on the French Defense than any other opening.

My collection:

John Watson's Play the French 4th edition, which I let somebody borrow for a week and never got back...

The Wonderful Winawer by Moskalenko.

Winning with the French by Uhlmann.

The Frence Defense (Reloaded) by Nikita Vitugov.

The Flexible French (another work by Moskalenko).

Just as a sample...

Jun-16-14  kia0708: The French Defence is
the most difficult
to break for me :-(
Jun-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Refused: And it also explains, how you consider yourself an expert of chess, despite your apparent lack of knowledge. Though, there it is less knowledge but more understanding that is amiss.>

In this regard, <conrag> is not dissimilar to <ulhumbrus>, the latter hiding behind generalities, the better to conceal his lack of actual understanding. <conrag> attempts to show off for those who know better, but does nothing more than look a fool at every turn.

<Conrag> the Blowhard, coming soon near you.

Jun-16-14  1d410: Maybe Aronian was sick after all. I sadly missed his rising to 2800+ phase and last checked in at the candidates. Was trying to get a degree.
Jun-16-14  Laskerschueler: I think Aronian said something about a little surgery he recently had. Things might get better.
Jun-16-14  Conrad93: Perfidious, play a slow game against me if you dare.
Jun-16-14  Conrad93: <The French Defence is
the most difficult
to break for me :-(>

You are probably being too aggressive.
You have to play more methodically.

Jun-17-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Conrad> Your French library seems limited: I have about 30 books on the French, including five by Lev Psakhis whom I regard as the best authority on the opening.
Jun-17-14  NeoIndian: <Domdaniel:I have about 30 books on the French> Wow, I didn't know there were that many books on the French! Maybe you could suggest a good book to learn the French from White's perspective? All I have is "The Wonderful Winawar" by Victor Moskalenko(2010), and "Mastering the French" by Neil McDonald(1997). The later I find a bit more helpful as a "starting out" guide, but many variations given there are outdated.
Jun-18-14  IFNB: <conrad93> What is your rating?
Jun-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <torrefan: To learn to use the word <entail> correctly does not entail much effort.>

Indeed not: rather less than any efforts <conrag> has made to contribute here in worthwhile fashion.

Jun-18-14  SimonWebbsTiger: @<NeoIndian>

There aren't really that many books which suggest ideas in the French from a White perspective. When they do, the books often suggest the oldest approach: the Advanced Variation. Gary Lane wrote one about a decade ago. One of the leading exponents of the Advance, Sveshnikov, wrote a 2 volume work more recently.

Alexander Khalifman wrote a multi-volume series on 1.e4 (Opening for White According to Anand). It suggests the sort of stuff I have always played versus one my own favourite Black defences! 3. Nc3 and go into the complications of the Winawer (esp. 3...Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3 6. bxc3 c5 7. Qg4 -- which I have played with both colours) or some of the quieter lines from the Classical.

Just get some books, see what you like and don't forget to look at games to see how Smyslov, Fischer, Karpov and Adams play White and Botvinnik, Korchnoi and esp. Uhlmann played Black.

Jun-18-14  NeoIndian: <SimonWebbsTiger> Thanks for the reply!
Jun-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <NeoIndian> As I said, I like Psakhis's books -- a 1990s volume on the French as a whole, and 21st century books on individual lines - Classical, Winawer, Tarrasch, Advance, etc. Moskalenko on the Winawer is also good, as is Sam Collins on the Advance. An old book, Mainline Winawer by John Moles (1970s) is now dated, but a classic. I also like Watson's books, especially his 'Dangerous Weapons: the French'.
Jun-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <NeoIndian> The suggestions by <SimonWebbsTiger> are also excellent. As far as database games go, I've learned a lot from Uhlmann, Korchnoi and Vaganian ... if you like the Swiss-Armenian (SWARM) variation of the Winawer (1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.a3 Ba5 etc) - as I do - then games by Vaganian, Botvinnik, and Hug are classics. Nigel Short, playing both sides of the French, is good too.

There are also some interesting 'irregular' or rare lines -- I've had some success with 3.Nd2 b6 and 3.Nc3 a6, for example. Legky is worth looking at.

Jun-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: One more French comment: a few years ago, the Advance (or Nimzowitsch) Variation 3.e5 was very much a minority taste -- but now it's quite fashionable among GMs. I have a feeling that the Exchange Variation (3.exd5 exd5 -- long thought to be drawish and unambitious) is due for a reappraisal. I've lost twice in the past year to 3.exd5 exd5 4.c4 -- the French equivalent of the Panov attack, which is dangerous and underrated.

I don't know of any really good books on this line. Psakhis covers it, but one really needs to go deep into databases.

Jun-19-14  NeoIndian: Many thanks on the French suggestions, Dom. As mostly an enthusiastic amateur of about 1850 strength, I prefer solid, logical play in the opening, as opposed to irrational, memory heavy complications in search of an "edge". This is because I feel that as a beginner, I have a lot to learn and enjoy besides endless opening discussions. The one exception is the Sicilian Defence with both colours, which is something of an addiction of mine.

However, When I tried to study the French Defence from White's perspective a bit seriously, I realized just how resilient and dynamic the Black setups are in the main lines, and how difficult it is to achieve a harmonious development without conceding *something* as White. I initially loved the Winawer PP, but the main lines there are just too sophisticated. On the other hand, I like the Nc3,e5 approach as opposed to the Tarrasch because I feel the later gives Black a much freer game with lots of options.

I have studied many notable games in 3.Nc3 lines, mainly Kasparov and Vishy playing White- and a recurring theme is that Black's problems have absolutely nothing to do with the opening play. For example:

Kasparov vs Short, 1994

After 11...c4,


click for larger view

Black is solid here, Short's subsequent loss has very little to do with any failings of the French.

Another example,

Anand vs Shirov, 2000

After 10...00,


click for larger view

I'd much rather be Black here!

For these reasons, I've decided to just stick to positional principles after 3.Nc3 Bb5 4.e5, and 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5, and not worry too much about "lines". Here's a game I liked:

Caruana vs Carlsen, 2012

The only problem is, I don't have a chess coach, or super advanced chess-friends offline who can offer me any guidance. And there doesn't seem to be a lot of French books from White's perspective that discuss these lines on my level.

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