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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-Mansiysk Tournament

Dmitry Jakovenko6.5/11(+4 -2 =5)[games]
Hikaru Nakamura6.5/11(+2 -0 =9)[games]
Fabiano Caruana6.5/11(+3 -1 =7)[games]
Leinier Dominguez Perez6/11(+2 -1 =8)[games]
Boris Gelfand6/11(+1 -0 =10)[games]
Peter Svidler5.5/11(+3 -3 =5)[games]
Alexander Grischuk5.5/11(+1 -1 =9)[games]
Anish Giri5.5/11(+2 -2 =7)[games]
Sergey Karjakin5.5/11(+2 -2 =7)[games]
Evgeny Tomashevsky5/11(+2 -3 =6)[games]
Baadur Jobava4/11(+1 -4 =6)[games]
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave3.5/11(+0 -4 =7)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-Mansiysk (2015)

Played in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia 14-26 May 2015. This was the fourth and final tournament in the Grand Prix series 2014-2015, the other ones being FIDE Grand Prix Baku (2014), FIDE Grand Prix Tashkent (2014) and FIDE Grand Prix Tbilisi (2015). Each player collected Grand Prix points (GPP) from three of the four events. Official site: http://khantymansiysk2015.fide.com/. Crosstable and final GP standings:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 GPP Baku Tash Tbil Khan GPP =1 Jakovenko * ½ 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 6½ 140 1 Caruana 155 75 --- 140 370 =1 Nakamura ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 6½ 140 2 Nakamura 82 125 --- 140 347 =1 Caruana 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 6½ 140 3 Jakovenko --- 30 140 140 310 =4 Domínguez 1 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 6 85 4 Tomashevsky 82 --- 170 30 282 =4 Gelfand ½ ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 6 85 5 Gelfand 155 15 --- 85 255 =6 Svidler 1 ½ ½ 0 0 * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 5½ 55 6 Mamedyarov 35 125 75 --- 235 =6 Grischuk ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 5½ 55 7 Karjakin 82 75 --- 55 212 =6 Giri 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 ½ 5½ 55 8 Radjabov 50 50 110 --- 210 =6 Karjakin 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * 1 ½ 1 5½ 55 9 Andreikin 20 170 10 --- 200 10 Tomashevsky ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 0 * 1 ½ 5 30 10 Grischuk 82 --- 40 55 177 11 Jobava ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 * ½ 4 20 =11 Giri --- 40 70 55 170 12 Vachier-Lagrave 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * 3½ 10 =11 Dominguez 10 --- 75 85 170 13 Svidler 82 --- 20 55 157 14 Jobava --- 75 40 20 135 =15 Kazimdzhanov 35 15 75 --- 125 =15 Vachier-Lagrave --- 75 40 10 125

The two best players overall, Caruana and Nakamura, qualified in this way for the World Championship Candidates (2016).

 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 66  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Jakovenko vs A Giri 1-0612015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
2. Karjakin vs Nakamura ½-½302015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskB76 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
3. Grischuk vs Svidler ½-½312015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD22 Queen's Gambit Accepted
4. Jobava vs Tomashevsky 0-1392015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
5. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Gelfand ½-½332015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskB30 Sicilian
6. Caruana vs L Dominguez ½-½402015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskC67 Ruy Lopez
7. Tomashevsky vs Grischuk ½-½742015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskE90 King's Indian
8. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Jobava ½-½682015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskB12 Caro-Kann Defense
9. A Giri vs Karjakin ½-½312015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskA07 King's Indian Attack
10. L Dominguez vs Jakovenko 1-0362015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD43 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
11. Svidler vs Caruana ½-½352015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD57 Queen's Gambit Declined, Lasker Defense
12. Gelfand vs Nakamura ½-½502015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskE97 King's Indian
13. Nakamura vs A Giri ½-½312015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskC54 Giuoco Piano
14. Caruana vs Tomashevsky 1-0412015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD15 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
15. Karjakin vs L Dominguez ½-½302015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskA07 King's Indian Attack
16. Jakovenko vs Svidler 0-1572015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskC69 Ruy Lopez, Exchange, Gligoric Variation
17. Grischuk vs M Vachier-Lagrave ½-½422015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskB54 Sicilian
18. Jobava vs Gelfand ½-½402015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD90 Grunfeld
19. Jobava vs Grischuk ½-½232015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskC53 Giuoco Piano
20. L Dominguez vs Nakamura ½-½232015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskB32 Sicilian
21. Svidler vs Karjakin ½-½312015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskA04 Reti Opening
22. Tomashevsky vs Jakovenko ½-½442015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskE00 Queen's Pawn Game
23. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Caruana 0-1432015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
24. Gelfand vs A Giri ½-½402015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
25. Karjakin vs Tomashevsky 1-0992015FIDE Grand Prix Khanty-MansiyskA04 Reti Opening
 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 66  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 36 OF 36 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-02-15  Absentee: Who's the "in-crowd"? I can't say I have noticed any huge bias in moderation.
Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <<diceman: Well, blame the players not the system.>>

Just the opposite. I can't blame the players for opting out with a premature peace declaration, but organizers shouldn't allow them to.

As for saying that <top players should be allowed to draw whenever they want>, the drawn result, just like the number of moves, is neither here nor there. What should not be allowed is the termination of a game in media res.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <In medias res is a Latin phrase used by the poet Horace; it means “in the middle of things.”>

Cool thing to learn.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < Gypsy: <In medias res is a Latin phrase used by the poet Horace; it means “in the middle of things.”> Cool thing to learn.>

And he used it to describe the beginning of the Iliad. Homer spends five lines invoking the Muse and then leaps in to the story.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Appaz: <<diceman> I think top players should be allowed to draw whenever they want.>

Of course they should, but then I'd rather prefer watching something else.

How do <real men> (including women) battle it out these days? Checkers?

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Eggman> In the 1984 World Championship Match game I cited above, the two Ks could not have opted out with a 3-fold.>

Never underestimate the ability of two top chess players to achieve a mutually desired goal. For example, from the final position in that game:


click for larger view

Stockfish 6 gives the following line at d=31 as the second best line of play for both sides:

36.Qd2 Be7 37.Nd5 Bc5 38.Nde3 Nxe3 39.Nxe3 Bxe3 40.fxe3 Qg5 41.Kf2 Qf5+ 42.Kg1 Qg5


click for larger view

And a draw by repetition. Whether you agree with Stockfish or not, this is not an unreasonable series of move <if both players have their mind set on achieving a draw by 3-fold repetition from the initial position>. Granted, White could have tried for more but at d=31 Stockfish evaluated the principal variation at only [+0.18], and at d=40 it evaluated its top 3 lines at [0.00]. So, in retrospect, I don't think that it was an "abomination" that Karpov agreed to a draw in that position, particularly if short of time.

So I disagree that "even peacefully inclined players can only really opt for a draw by 3-fold rep in a lifeless position that was already headed for a draw anyhow." I think that the opportunities for a 3-fold draw by repetition are much more prevalent than that <provided that this is the goal of both players>. Of course, this is only one example and for every counter-example that you can provide I suspect that I can come up with a counter-counter example, etc. so I don't think that is the way to settle this disagreement if indeed there is a way. We'll just have to agree to disagree.

So, like I said, I agree with your idea and players should be forced to continue playing a position that is not clearly drawn, I just don't see how that can be done while the 3-fold repetition rule is in effect. And since I don't think that it would be wise to eliminate the 3-fold repetition rule, I am afraid that we are stuck with the current imperfect system.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <<Of course they should>>

<Of course> players should be allowed to draw whenever they want? <Of course>? As in, obviously, no doubt about it, nothing to discuss? Tennis players proclaim a draw, it would be the sporting scandal of the century, but with chess players, well, <of course> they should be able to do so??

Really, it's not the players or even the arbiters who are to blame; it's complacent chess fans. That culture needs to change.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<HeMateMe> A moot point, because such players wouldn't behave this way. If they did, what sponsor would pay any of them an appearance fee? Chessplayers are well aware of this.>

Perhaps I am overly cynical but I think that players are already behaving that way, it's just not that apparent. For example, take the following games from this tournament:

L Dominguez vs Nakamura, 2015 (23 moves)


click for larger view

Gelfand vs Tomashevsky, 2015 (23 moves)


click for larger view

Nakamura vs A Giri, 2015 (31 moves)


click for larger view

All 3 games were, or were about to be, draws by 3-fold repetition. The players could have been forced to play on until move 40 but that then would have simply been an 18-fold position repetition for the first 2 games and a 10-fold position repetition for the last game. Then it would have been obvious what was going on.

And as far as to which sponsor would pay any of them an appearance fee, I think that the sponsors would be up in arms against the set of rules that caused this condition more than anything else, and that they would put pressure on the chess rules committee to rescind the appropriate rules.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Appaz> How do <real men> (including women) battle it out these days? Checkers?>

I think that they play rock-paper-scissors-lizard-Spock. :-)

Jun-02-15  schweigzwang: <Really, it's not the players or even the arbiters who are to blame; it's complacent chess fans.>

Oh, so you're blaming me. Huh. Meh. I guess so, whatever.

Jun-02-15  1d410: Older players need quick draws or they will run out of energy and go on losing streaks like Kramnik
Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Eggman: <<diceman: Well, blame the players not the system.>>

Just the opposite. I can't blame the players for opting out with a premature peace declaration, but organizers shouldn't allow them to.>

Maybe if the draw doesn't meet your
standards the <organizers> can step in and play it out?

What does Magnus know anyway?

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <<What does Magnus know anyway?>>

When it comes to "GM draws", I wouldn't say that Carlsen is a big offender - far from it. Really, things have gotten much better among top players in the last ten years or so.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Eggman> things have gotten much better among top players in the last ten years or so.>

I agree. So maybe this is a non-issue, at least at the moment.

Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <keypusher: < Gypsy: <In medias res is a Latin phrase used by the poet Horace; it means “in the middle of things.”> Cool thing to learn.>

And he used it to describe the beginning of the Iliad. Homer spends five lines invoking the Muse and then leaps in to the story.>

Thank you my friend!

---

Growing up behind Iron Curtain, my education in classics is a bit lacking. We were more schooled in the adventures of Chuk and Gek.

My grandfather remembered his Latin, though: I can still see him to rise from the kitchen table and begin recite immortal words of Cicero. I understood nil of it, just the sound of beautiful words washed over me in grand waves and echoed in the room. I admired his memory and his Austro-Hungarian classical education which left him with such grand knowledge. Yet, there too was a flaw in all of that: My grandfather remembered those words of Cicero ... phonetically.

Jun-03-15  schweigzwang: Cicero was great but you can't beat a the late Horace.
Jun-03-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Eggman: <<What does Magnus know anyway?>>

When it comes to "GM draws", I wouldn't say that Carlsen is a big offender - far from it. Really, things have gotten much better among top players in the last ten years or so.>

He has the motivation that doesn't require <organizers>.

...he loses rating points. :)

Jun-03-15  haydn20: Modern GM defensive skills are so high that if one takes the risk necessary to win, one also runs an appreciable risk of losing (esp. as Black). Therefore, if a GM has nothing to gain and something ($ or qualification) to lose, he will often steer for safe waters (esp. as White), and it would be irrational not to. If the opponent wants trouble, let him start it.
Jun-03-15  Kinghunt: Carlsen also has such great confidence in his defensive skills that he can quite realistically push for wins without risking anything. Most of his losses come from very different types of positions, where he does not benefit from securing a draw and is instead pushing too hard for a win. I would argue that this explains his relatively high loss rate to non-elite players (say, 2725 and below).
Jun-03-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <<haydn20>>

For my part I am only objecting to the *premature* cancellation of a game by mutual agreement, commonly known as the "GM draw". I am not objecting to draws or to "drawing masters" like Ulf Andersson.

Jun-04-15  1d410: Topalov is not rating sitting. He is taking a well-deserved vacation :)
Jun-05-15  Kinghunt: FIDE should ideally average live ratings over the course of the year, after each game. Barring that, they should at least weight the average by number of games played in the previous month. If you don't play in a given month, that month shouldn't affect your average rating for the year.
Jun-10-15  Caissanist: Nakamura lightly annotates several games from the event here: http://www.chess.com/blog/Hikaru/fi... .
Jun-25-15  Shoukhath007: in norway chess championship anand played amazing move vs lagrave https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lTxVt... bye
Mar-10-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Eggman: <<I'll break every frigging roulette wheel in creation to prevent the possibility of that abomination from 1983 recurring. Once was too often for that wretchedness.>>

Yes, but on the other hand, you could hardly have chosen a better victim than Huebner, who, having deprived the chess world of a candidates final in the previous cycle, got his comeuppance!>

Excellent point.

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