chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

🏆
TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Capablanca Memorial Tournament

Yu Yangyi7/10(+5 -1 =4)[games]
Dmitry Andreikin5.5/10(+2 -1 =7)[games]
Pavel Eljanov5.5/10(+3 -2 =5)[games]
Leinier Dominguez Perez4.5/10(+2 -3 =5)[games]
Ian Nepomniachtchi4/10(+2 -4 =4)[games]
Lazaro Bruzon Batista3.5/10(+1 -4 =5)[games]

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Capablanca Memorial (2015)

Yu Yangyi of China scored 7 points after ten rounds, followed by Dmitry Andreikin and Pavel Eljanov who each tied with 5½. Leinier Dominguez Perez , Ian Nepomniachtchi and Lazaro Bruzon Batista also played in the Havana event. It took place from the 15th-25th of June and the time control was 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with 30 seconds increment from the start.

Games(1) such as E Cordova vs K Miton, 2015 or Y Bacallao Alonso vs E Espinosa, 2015 were part of the premier group (it was Vitaly Kunin who won(1) that section with 6.5, followed by Jan-Krzysztof Duda , Yusnel Bacallao Alonso and Isan Reynaldo Ortiz Suarez, each scoring 5/9), along with others, such as an open section.

The 49th Capablanca Memorial (2014) and Capablanca Memorial (Elite) (2016) were the previous and next events in this series.

Websites: (1) http://theweekinchess.com/assets/fi... , (2) https://lockerdome.com/chess/780173... , (3) https://hunonchess.com/50th-capabla... , (4) http://chess.business-news-blog.eu/... , (5) http://www.chessdom.com/capablanca-... , (6) Wikipedia article: Capablanca Memorial

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 30  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Yu Yangyi vs D Andreikin 1-0792015Capablanca MemorialC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
2. L Dominguez vs L Bruzon Batista  ½-½262015Capablanca MemorialC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
3. Eljanov vs I Nepomniachtchi 1-0352015Capablanca MemorialD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
4. I Nepomniachtchi vs L Dominguez 0-1502015Capablanca MemorialA04 Reti Opening
5. D Andreikin vs L Bruzon Batista 1-0432015Capablanca MemorialD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
6. Yu Yangyi vs Eljanov  ½-½322015Capablanca MemorialC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
7. L Bruzon Batista vs I Nepomniachtchi ½-½1092015Capablanca MemorialA04 Reti Opening
8. L Dominguez vs Yu Yangyi 0-1382015Capablanca MemorialE10 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Eljanov vs D Andreikin  ½-½472015Capablanca MemorialD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
10. Yu Yangyi vs L Bruzon Batista 1-0662015Capablanca MemorialC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
11. D Andreikin vs I Nepomniachtchi  ½-½862015Capablanca MemorialA33 English, Symmetrical
12. Eljanov vs L Dominguez  ½-½392015Capablanca MemorialA36 English
13. I Nepomniachtchi vs Yu Yangyi 0-1442015Capablanca MemorialB33 Sicilian
14. L Bruzon Batista vs L Dominguez ½-½132015Capablanca MemorialC67 Ruy Lopez
15. L Bruzon Batista vs Eljanov 1-0612015Capablanca MemorialC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
16. L Dominguez vs D Andreikin ½-½132015Capablanca MemorialB46 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
17. I Nepomniachtchi vs Eljanov 0-1522015Capablanca MemorialC45 Scotch Game
18. D Andreikin vs Yu Yangyi 1-0662015Capablanca MemorialB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
19. L Bruzon Batista vs D Andreikin  ½-½242015Capablanca MemorialA06 Reti Opening
20. L Dominguez vs I Nepomniachtchi 0-1612015Capablanca MemorialD83 Grunfeld, Grunfeld Gambit
21. Eljanov vs Yu Yangyi  ½-½692015Capablanca MemorialA18 English, Mikenas-Carls
22. I Nepomniachtchi vs L Bruzon Batista 1-0402015Capablanca MemorialC45 Scotch Game
23. D Andreikin vs Eljanov  ½-½252015Capablanca MemorialC67 Ruy Lopez
24. Yu Yangyi vs L Dominguez 1-0492015Capablanca MemorialB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
25. D Andreikin vs L Dominguez ½-½122015Capablanca MemorialA35 English, Symmetrical
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 30  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-20-15  Mr. V: check out this crazy fight!
I Nepomniachtchi vs Y Yu, 2015
Jun-20-15  dumbgai: Wow, Yangi destroying a field of 2700-level GMs. Very impressive stuff.
Jun-20-15  shintaro go: Yu yangyi has been impressive in terms of capitalizing on his opponents' mistakes. A fine showing nevertheless
Jun-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor:  <Mr. V: Before anyone asks, the tie-break system on the official website is: 1. Head-to-head  2. Sonnenborn Berger 
3. Number of won games 
4. Most victories with the black pieces 
5. I don't know how to translate this last one which I've never heard of, but it is given in spanish as "Sistema Koya">

No one needed to raise this question from the start. It was Yu "talking to me" Yangyi all over the place. He probably did not know the tie-break rules in Spanish or English <;)

Jun-21-15  ex0duz: Dunno why no one is commenting on this tourney. But yeah. Yu is really turning up the heat and taking his chances.. see his game vs Nepo for more info. He didn't play for a draw while up 3.5/4, but played wild/aggressive chess, and came out on top after a highly complex middle game.

I love it when players play like that, like they have nothing to lose.. which is why i loved Moro/Tal/Kasparov etc. Always going for 100% and aggressive attacking chess. It's not dead JUST yet.

And like others have said, maybe this performance is a response to Wei Yi breaking 2700 and catching up to Yu.. he is fighting for his position to be 3rd best player in China atm(after Ding Liren and Li Chao B). I also have no idea how Li Chao B got rated so high, because i don't remember him winning any SuperGM Tourneys etc.. whereas i at least remember Yu Yangyi winning Qatar Masters and beating the likes of Kramnik to do it..

The rivalry between the chinese youngsters seem to be alive and well. I have a feeling that because of them having such high skill and also high motivation, that the future WC will be one of these oung chinese guys. They all show lots of promise.. we tend to focus on the extreme(like Wei Yi), but then forget about the slow but steady guys.. like Li Chao B(who is rated 2nd best in China with a rating of like 2740+) :P

Jun-21-15  donjova: <ex0duz>, Li Chao had great results at a few open tournaments recently (I've just checked it out, those were Cappelle Grande and Neckar) and that's where he boosted his rating to these proportions. :) He hasn't played since that, so he keeps his rating. Perhaps he is currently overrated, at least in comparison to other Chinese players (they tend to be underrated, generally speaking, compared to the western players). He has been in high 2600 for a long time.
Jun-21-15  AzingaBonzer: <donjova: they tend to be underrated, generally speaking, compared to the western players>

Really? That's interesting. If so, what do you think is the reason for it?

Jun-21-15  donjova: Well, it' only a hypothesis, but someone has noticed that Chinese tend to gain the rating points when they play in international events, and then lose them when they play in the homeland (Chinese Championships, Chinese League etc). Also, western players who play in the Chinese League (such as Malakhov) usually lose rating points there. All of that may suggest that many Chinese players are actually stronger than their rating shows.

The reason for that may be the fact that the great majority of Chinese players rarely play in international events. Therefore, they form the semi-independent pool of players whose ratings don't really correspond to the ratings in the international pool (in this case, they turn out to be underrated, probably because with the smaller number of players in the pool it's harder for the top half to build up to the same numbers as their western counterparts).

Of course, as the Chinese "take away" points in the international events and "give them" to the other Chinese in their home events, this will correct eventually, but it takes some time.

Jun-21-15  dumbgai: Basically, they have a lot of talented young kids in China who don't get to play internationally. So chess in China is a somewhat closed system, where if someone improves in skill, they can only gain points at the expense of others in the same system. When this happens, the entire player pool becomes a bit underrated compared to those outside of the closed system. As an example, let's say a GM is properly rated at 2600 and starts to play lots of events in China. If many of his opponents are rated 2400 but are actually 2500-2600 in skill, this player's rating will drop, let's say to 2550. Then he decides to play in an international tournament, with a rating of 2550 but skill level of 2600. So he will likely gain rating points because he's now underrated.

Note that the converge is also true: if a closed system has many players who decline in skill (most commonly due to inactivity and age), the overall group will have inflated ratings. In a country like Russia or the United States, there are lots of rated players so the player pool is large enough that a few players gaining or losing playing strength won't substantially affect the group in either direction. In China, the player pool is quite small, and there are generally more players improving than declining. So the result is Chinese players being underrated as a whole.

Of course, it's not a completely closed system because the top Chinese players do face opponents from other countries regularly (either by playing abroad, or foreign players competing in the Chinese League).

Jun-21-15  dumbgai: To add to the above, the top Chinese GMs like Yu Yangyi, Ding Liren, etc. are probably not underrated, because they play the majority of their rated games abroad. It's the lower rated players who play only domestically who tend to be underrated. Every once in a while, an untitled Chinese player will show up out of nowhere and win a GM tournament, like Wang Hao at Dubai 2005, or Wei Yi at Reykjavik 2013.
Jun-23-15  fgh: <Every once in a while, an untitled Chinese player will show up out of nowhere and win a GM tournament, like Wang Hao at Dubai 2005, or Wei Yi at Reykjavik 2013.>

You're getting something mixed up:

Reykjavik Open (2013)

Jun-23-15  fgh: And for the record, Wei Yi was not untitled in 2013.
Jun-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Mr. V> Thanks for pointing out this game
Jun-23-15  dumbgai: <fgh> And <2200 ELO> in your profile should be <2200 Elo> (not all caps). We can all nitpick little details that have little to do with the main point. Let me correct what I wrote: <Every once in a while, a relatively unknown Chinese player will suddenly produce a very strong performance against higher rated GMs.> Happy now?
Jun-23-15  fisayo123: <Dunno why no one is commenting on this tourney. But yeah. Yu is really turning up the heat and taking his chances.. see his game vs Nepo for more info. He didn't play for a draw while up 3.5/4, but played wild/aggressive chess, and came out on top after a highly complex middle game. I love it when players play like that, like they have nothing to lose.. which is why i loved Moro/Tal/Kasparov etc. Always going for 100% and aggressive attacking chess. It's not dead JUST yet.>

I hear you <ex0duz> my brother, I hear you.

Jun-24-15  fgh: <We can all nitpick little details that have little to do with the main point.>

Except there's a big (not little) difference between winning a tournament and sharing 2nd place with several players, just as there is a big difference between most untitled players and the average IM/GM.

Jun-24-15  AzingaBonzer: <fgh>

Much stronger performance than implied by rating: check. Relatively unknown IM playing in field of top GMs: check. Those are the main points of <dumbgai's> comment, right there. Not hard to see what he's getting at.

So yeah. I'd call what you're doing nitpicking.

Jun-24-15  Shoukhath007: here is the amazing chess game. Which has 3 pawns on 7th rank. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SU1ke... bye
Jun-24-15  dumbgai: <Shoukhath007> Please don't post spam on these pages. That's a famous game but it has nothing to do with this tournament. You should discuss your analysis at McDonnell vs La Bourdonnais, 1834.

Also, I'm surprised <fgh> hasn't pointed out that you misspelled both McDonnell and La Bourdonnais in your video title.

Jun-25-15  Shoukhath007: <dumbgai> thanks for the information sir.but i will not agree with you, you said there is no relation between my video and this page but somebody may get entertained by watching my video. You are not interested in my video so you r negotiating me
Jun-25-15  dumbgai: Go away, troll. Welcome to my ignore list.
Jun-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Wow. In the last round, 2 games (combined <20> moves) took <15> minutes to finish. Eljanov-Bruzon still remaining.
Jun-25-15  Mr. V: honestly with the short draws why does Bruzón even bother to show up? Some games he fights hard but not often
Jun-25-15  AzingaBonzer: <Shoukhath007>

Your video is off-topic. Saying it might entertain someone is irrelevant. Pornography might entertain someone too. That doesn't mean you should start posting links to it here.

Jun-29-15  MindCtrol9: There is a site where players are 2200 who play higher rating players producing amazing games.I think, known .GMs take a look at those games, too.This is:"FIRE ON THE BOARD OR FIRE ON BOARD".
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC