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🏆 China - Russia (2015)

  PARTICIPANTS (sorted by highest achieved rating; click on name to see player's games)
Peter Svidler, Yu Yangyi, Wei Yi, Nikita Vitiugov, Maxim Matlakov, Vladimir Fedoseev, Bu Xiangzhi, Daniil Dubov, Lu Shanglei, Wang Chen

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
China - Russia (2015)

Played in Ningbo, China 15-20 July 2015. China won 14-11, http://chess-results.com/tnr180562....

 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. D Dubov vs Bu Xiangzhi 0-1552015China - RussiaD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Wang Chen vs Vitiugov  ½-½322015China - RussiaA07 King's Indian Attack
3. Yu Yangyi vs Svidler ½-½622015China - RussiaC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
4. M Matlakov vs Lu Shanglei 1-0302015China - RussiaD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
5. V Fedoseev vs Wei Yi 0-1452015China - RussiaD87 Grunfeld, Exchange
6. Bu Xiangzhi vs M Matlakov  ½-½392015China - RussiaA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
7. Wei Yi vs Svidler 0-1672015China - RussiaC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
8. Lu Shanglei vs V Fedoseev 1-0572015China - RussiaC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
9. D Dubov vs Wang Chen  ½-½542015China - RussiaD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
10. Vitiugov vs Yu Yangyi  ½-½312015China - RussiaD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
11. Lu Shanglei vs D Dubov 1-0372015China - RussiaC85 Ruy Lopez, Exchange Variation Doubly Deferred (DERLD)
12. Wang Chen vs V Fedoseev  ½-½642015China - RussiaB25 Sicilian, Closed
13. Svidler vs Bu Xiangzhi  ½-½312015China - RussiaB97 Sicilian, Najdorf
14. Yu Yangyi vs M Matlakov  ½-½332015China - RussiaB48 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
15. Vitiugov vs Wei Yi 0-1402015China - RussiaE60 King's Indian Defense
16. Wei Yi vs D Dubov 1-0692015China - RussiaB25 Sicilian, Closed
17. V Fedoseev vs Yu Yangyi  1-0422015China - RussiaB20 Sicilian
18. M Matlakov vs Wang Chen 1-0402015China - RussiaD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
19. Bu Xiangzhi vs Vitiugov  1-0482015China - RussiaA35 English, Symmetrical
20. Svidler vs Lu Shanglei  ½-½222015China - RussiaD44 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
21. Wang Chen vs Svidler  ½-½612015China - RussiaB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
22. Lu Shanglei vs Vitiugov  ½-½452015China - RussiaC07 French, Tarrasch
23. M Matlakov vs Wei Yi 1-0322015China - RussiaD85 Grunfeld
24. Bu Xiangzhi vs V Fedoseev  1-0352015China - RussiaA04 Reti Opening
25. D Dubov vs Yu Yangyi  ½-½1012015China - RussiaA14 English
 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-18-15  7he5haman: Well then don't go around phrasing your 'opinions' as facts. Try using ' in my opinion' and 'i think ' so people know you aren't flat out contradicting them. But I doubt you'll listen.

There you go again. That's what made that match appealing to YOU. Don't try to tell me what made it appealing to me (or what should have made it appealing to me).

I haven't anything else to say on the matter. I was just saying that I would like to see an event. If you disagree that's fine but you don't have to try and belittle me and my posts in the process. And if that wasn't your intention then I'm sorry but you really do need to learn the difference between expressing an opinion and expressing a fact.

Good day.

Jul-18-15  SimplicityRichard: I have been gripped by an intense desire to comment on this thread my usual quietude notwithstanding.

Firstly, in my view, the political dimension of the Fischer-Spassky match as narrated in "Bobby Fischer Goes To War" introduced a thrilling aspect to the 1972 Chess Championship.

Secondly, I have made use of a few forums in the past but never have I encountered an erudite and often mature forum as Chessgames.com; my continued membership attests to this fact. Furthermore, this is the only forum to which I am a member, and not due to a lack of choice.

Finally, I have often observed that it is those that are guilty of an act who are first to accuse others of what they themselves are guilty of; a case of a "pre-emptory strike"! #

Jul-18-15  fgh: <SimplicityRichard: I have been gripped by an intense desire to comment on this thread my usual quietude notwithstanding.

Firstly, in my view, the political dimension of the Fischer-Spassky match as narrated in "Bobby Fischer Goes To War" introduced a thrilling aspect to the 1972 Chess Championship.

Secondly, I have made use of a few forums in the past but never have I encountered an erudite and often mature forum as Chessgames.com; my continued membership attests to this fact. Furthermore, this is the only forum to which I am a member, and not due to a lack of choice.

Finally, I have often observed that it is those that are guilty of an act who are first to accuse others of what they themselves are guilty of; a case of a "pre-emptory strike"! #>

Blah blah blah ... what a shame your "intense desire to comment on this thread" gave birth to nothing but a post not related to the China-Russia match.

Next time, stick to writing incoherent posts about how "discrimination must be fought," even though "women should be afforded special privileges."

Jul-18-15  soughzin: Oof, Fischer, Yi, Kasp, Carlsen, they were/are all great at a young age. Let's enjoy the play and not "Go To War" against each other ha
Jul-18-15  AzingaBonzer: <fgh>

First part of your post:

<Blah blah blah ... what a shame your "intense desire to comment on this thread" gave birth to nothing but a post not related to the China-Russia match.>

Second part:

<Next time, stick to writing incoherent posts about how "discrimination must be fought," even though "women should be afforded special privileges.">

"Pot, meet kettle."

Jul-18-15  AzingaBonzer: By the way, the rule of thumb for expressing opinions is simple: take whatever statement you wanted to make, and either prefix an "I think" or tack on an "in my opinion" at the end. There, problem solved, and you don't have to worry about people misinterpreting your words.
Jul-19-15  SimplicityRichard: <fgh>

It is absolutely clear that you've never heard of "positive discrimination". And just to re-visit the issue you recall so well, the recent Nigel Short comments that ignited a row with Judit Polgar served as an excellent example of what I had been attempting to put across.

Anyhow, be the first to join my ignore list; a function I never thought I would make use of, as I am a rather calm fellow.

Auf wiedersehen.

Jul-19-15  dumbgai: What a crazy round, with 7 decisive games out of the 10 games (4 in the men's section, 3 in the women's). The men split this round evenly, but the Chinese women scored a big win. China now leads both sections: 11.5-8.5 in the men's and 11-9 in the women's. Russia is going to need a miracle comeback in the final round.

I did say at the beginning that although Russia had the rating advantage, China shouldn't be counted out. Maybe the Chinese players perform even better when playing at home?

Jul-19-15  AzingaBonzer: Well, you've got to take into account that Chinese players who don't play internationally (e.g. Lu Shanglei and Wang Chen) are probably significantly underrated--as both of the above have been proving during this match.

The men's match could have been in China's favor too, though, if only Yu had won, or even drew. It wouldn't have been out of the question--I mean, he's the favorite by ratings and everything. Yu's been playing well below his usual level. Some sort of fatigue setting in from Capablanca and Danzhou, maybe?

Jul-19-15  Chichiboy: Get the best 5 Russians against the best 5 Chinese and I guess the Chinese would still come out on top. Which country won the Olympiads where all countries sent their best representative? Twenty years ago this was more than the best dream the Chinese could have and obviously beyond the worst the Russians could imagine.
Jul-19-15  soughzin: Eh that's no guarantee Chichiboy. Kramnik, Grischuk, Karjakin, Tomashevsky, Svidler. Could go either way, though.
Jul-19-15  dumbgai: Team Russia at the Olympiad is really a curious case. They always have the strongest team on paper, sometimes by a considerable margin. They got Karjakin to transfer from one of their top rivals, yet haven't managed to win it all since Kasparov was on the team. Contrary to what some people think, Russia doesn't necessarily severely underperform.

For example, the 2010 Russian team had an overall TPR of 2745, but only managed second place to the Ukrainians who performed at 2752. Similarly, in 2012 the Russians again performed at 2745 but got edged on tiebreak by Armenia (who had a slightly lower 2734 TPR).

Jul-19-15  AzingaBonzer: Well, China seems to have a pretty solid thing going at the Olympiads. Their strategy last year was pretty good: have the three youngsters (Wei Yi, Yu Yangyi, and Ding Liren) as the heavy hitters and the "veterans" (Wang Yue and Ni Hua) as the rock-solid defenders--<especially> Wang Yue. That guy really is the Chinese Petrosian.
Jul-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: In the final round (the current result is 2-2) Yu Yangyi is trying to win the following theoretically drawn endgame:


click for larger view

Jul-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  sonia91: According to http://www.chess-results.com/tnr180... the draw between Dubov and Yu is already agreed, although the live broadcast is still showing the game as in progress.

So China won the match with the final score of 29-21 (14-11 in the men's section, 15-10 in the women's section).

The best players in the men's section are Bu Xiangzhi (performance 2938) and Maxim Matlakov (performance 2894) with 4/5.

Jul-20-15  dumbgai: Bu Xiangzhi's strong performance pushes his live rating to 2707.4. China now has 8 players with a live rating of 2700+. Former #1 Wang Hao is currently 8th. It will be very interesting to see who will play for them in the next Olympiad.
Jul-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  sonia91: The Russian team despite the loss looks happier (except for Vitiugov who looks depressed) than the Chinese team at the closing cerimony:

http://slide.sports.sina.com.cn/go/... (Chinese men's team)

http://slide.sports.sina.com.cn/go/... (Russian men's team)

Jul-20-15  dumbgai: Svidler appears to have slimmed down a bit. He was quite chunky in his younger years. Wei Yi looks older than three of his teammates.
Jul-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: Next stop for China; team USA (preferably the A-team) http://www.legendarytv.com/the_a-te... <;)
Jul-20-15  AzingaBonzer: <dumbgai>

Which three?

Jul-20-15  AsosLight: Well he looks older than everyone including the coach.
Jul-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I couldn't believe Wei Yi was only 14 when I first saw his photo. He looked 19, at the time.
Jul-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: The Chinese are coming in waves.

Last December, 16 years old Chines IM Bai Jinshi shared win at the 2014 London Chess Classic Open.

After 10 rounds of the ongoing Chinese Championships (Group B) he is leading with 14 years old FM Zhu Yi scoring 8/10.

http://en.chessbase.com/Portals/4/f...

(Bai Jinshi playing against GM Robin van Kampen at the World Junior Chess Championship 2014)

Jul-21-15  Everett: "Positive discrimination?"
Jul-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  sonia91: A nice article by chess24:

<Donít play the Chinese in China!>

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/do...

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