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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
London Chess Classic Tournament

Magnus Carlsen5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Anish Giri5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Levon Aronian5/9(+1 -0 =8)[games]
Alexander Grischuk4.5/9(+1 -1 =7)[games]
Michael Adams4.5/9(+0 -0 =9)[games]
Fabiano Caruana4.5/9(+0 -0 =9)[games]
Hikaru Nakamura4/9(+1 -2 =6)[games]
Viswanathan Anand3.5/9(+1 -3 =5)[games]
Veselin Topalov2.5/9(+0 -4 =5)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
London Chess Classic (2015)

The 7th London Chess Classic was played in London, England 4-13 December 2015. In the three-way rapid tiebreak, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave first defeated Anish Giri and then fell to Magnus Carlsen, who collected 12 Grand Chess Tour points (GP).

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 GP 1 Carlsen 2834 * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 5½ 12 2 Giri 2784 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 5½ 10 3 Vachier-Lagrave 2773 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 5½ 8 4 Aronian 2788 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 5 7 5 Grischuk 2747 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 4½ 6 =6 Caruana 2787 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 4½ 4½ =6 Adams 2737 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 4½ 4½ 8 Nakamura 2793 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ 4 3 9 Anand 2796 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 * 1 3½ 2 10 Topalov 2803 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * 2½ 1

Official site: https://www.londonchessclassic.com/... FIDE page: https://www.fide.com/component/cont... Chess.com: https://www.chess.com/news/view/mag... TWIC: https://theweekinchess.com/chessnew...

Carlsen's victory at this event (LC) crowned him the winner of the Grand Chess Tour 2015, which also included Norway Chess (2015) (NC) and Sinquefield Cup (2015) (SC):

NC SC LC GP Earnings 1 Carlsen 4 10 12 26 $215,000 2 Giri 7 6 10 23 $155,000 3 Aronian 2 13 7 22 $145,000 4 Vachier-Lagrave 5 7 8 20 $90,000 5 Nakamura 8 8 3 19 $95,000 6 Topalov 13 4 1 18 $105,000 7 Grischuk 3 5 6 14 $60,000 8 Anand 10 2 2 14 $80,000 9 Caruana 6 3 4½ 13½ $55,000 10 Adams - - 4½ 4½ $20,000 11 Hammer 1 - - 1 $15,000 12 So - 1 - 1 $15,000

Grand Chess Tour 2015: Wikipedia article: Grand Chess Tour#Grand Chess Tour 2015. Crosstables: http://grandchesstour.org/2015-tour...

Previous edition: London Chess Classic (2014). Next: London Chess Classic (2016)

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Carlsen ½-½282015London Chess ClassicB33 Sicilian
2. Caruana vs Aronian ½-½512015London Chess ClassicC78 Ruy Lopez
3. Topalov vs A Giri 0-1402015London Chess ClassicE60 King's Indian Defense
4. Anand vs Adams ½-½322015London Chess ClassicA20 English
5. Grischuk vs Nakamura ½-½382015London Chess ClassicC67 Ruy Lopez
6. Nakamura vs M Vachier-Lagrave ½-½562015London Chess ClassicA48 King's Indian
7. Topalov vs Grischuk ½-½332015London Chess ClassicC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
8. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½422015London Chess ClassicC67 Ruy Lopez
9. Aronian vs Anand ½-½342015London Chess ClassicD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
10. A Giri vs Adams ½-½262015London Chess ClassicE37 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
11. Grischuk vs A Giri ½-½472015London Chess ClassicC67 Ruy Lopez
12. Caruana vs Nakamura ½-½452015London Chess ClassicC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
13. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Topalov 1-0382015London Chess ClassicB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
14. Adams vs Aronian ½-½342015London Chess ClassicC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
15. Anand vs Carlsen ½-½562015London Chess ClassicC67 Ruy Lopez
16. Topalov vs Caruana ½-½832015London Chess ClassicC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
17. Nakamura vs Anand 1-0412015London Chess ClassicE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
18. Carlsen vs Adams ½-½782015London Chess ClassicA06 Reti Opening
19. Grischuk vs M Vachier-Lagrave ½-½432015London Chess ClassicB96 Sicilian, Najdorf
20. A Giri vs Aronian ½-½332015London Chess ClassicA22 English
21. Anand vs Topalov 1-0742015London Chess ClassicB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
22. Adams vs Nakamura ½-½562015London Chess ClassicC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
23. Caruana vs Grischuk ½-½582015London Chess ClassicC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
24. Aronian vs Carlsen ½-½402015London Chess ClassicD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
25. M Vachier-Lagrave vs A Giri ½-½312015London Chess ClassicC67 Ruy Lopez
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 41 OF 41 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-19-15  Absentee: <BOSTER: < Sokrates: I- and only I - am responsible for my moves on the board>. If it is so clear like Mona Lisa Smile, why do we need the arbiters in tour?>

To make sure you haven't roided up to make your pineal gland secrete an abnormal quantity of luck-enzyme.

Dec-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: < Jim Bartle: There may be no luck in chess but there is Michal Luch.>

And David Lucky

Also David Glueck (again David?) as well as Michael Glueck (although Glück can mean both luck and happiness... But is there happiness in chess?!)

Dec-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: No luck, oh really?

L Luck

Dec-19-15  BOSTER: The arbitres ( 4 arbitres watching the game) should see how Naka had < castled > with <two hands > in round 3, World Cup in Baku. In this case he'd be eliminated, not
Nepo.
Dec-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy:
<<... in the most fair game of all: a game of chess.>

Why is chess fairer than all other games or sports?>

<Jim Bartle: No dice. No luck of the draw. No lucky bounces.>

<tamar: No parquet floor>

There are other games that share those characteristics, Jim, but that is my lesser point.

My main point is this: A die or a ball are deterministic objects and they fully obey the laws of physics. Why should I view a mastery of these objects as being a matter of luck any more or less than mastery of the chess board?

You view a die or coin as a fair source of randomness. But in my grad school years, I TA'd for a guy who could toss a fair coin heads several times in a row. (He could also do perfect shuffles while lecturing on the applications of group theory to statistics; and many other parlor tricks.) He smiled an "ow shucks" smile when we oohed and aahed and he floored us with his explanation: "I practiced last night."

Or consider a soccer ball. You can pretty well figure its trajectory from its Reynold's number and initial conditions. The physics of its flight is that of Magnus effect (no, different Magnus). The amount of computation in fluid-dynamics number crunching is huge, but so is the amount of computation involved in evaluating a complex chess position.

All in all, there seems to be two aspects of skill -- (1) computing or estimating effects of our action, (2) executing our action sufficiently accurately.

My view is that if (1) does not allow completely perfect evaluation or if (2) does not permit perfect accuracy of action, we are in the realm where skill and luck combine.

Dec-19-15  Shams: <BOSTER> <The arbitres ( 4 arbitres watching the game) should see how Naka had < castled > with <two hands > in round 3, World Cup in Baku. In this case he'd be eliminated, not Nepo.>

Not true; the penalty would have been a warning and not a forfeit.

Dec-19-15  Chessinfinite: Nice commentary by the GMs-next time maybe they should invite Daniel Gormally for his passive/ aggressive commentary!
Dec-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Post-mortem with Aronian would be fun.
Dec-20-15  Clemens Scheitz: <Gypsy>, no ifs or buts, my view is that all human undertakings are in the realm where skill and luck combine.
Dec-20-15  Clemens Scheitz: ...and skill requires luck, but luck works in mysterious ways...
Dec-20-15  BOSTER: <Shams: not a forfeit>.

It was a blitz game.

In blitz chess rules are different.
According to the WBCA rules, a player who makes illegal move loses the game immediately.

This is the game So vs Akobian, US Champ.2015.


click for larger view

It 's difficult to believe that black in this pos. can win in one move.

"But Akobian played a winning move-he approached the arbiter and pointed out that So had been writing messages on a sheet of paper.

Since So had already been warned twice for writing notes arbiter forfeited So."

Dec-20-15  Shams: <BOSTER> Nakamura didn't make an illegal move, he made a legal move but he executed it wrongly. From what I've read that gets a warning.
Dec-20-15  BOSTER: < Shams>.Thanks.
Dec-20-15  Shams: <BOSTER> I found this but it's confusing: http://www.angelfire.com/games5/che...
Dec-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: < Sokrates: I- and only I - am responsible for my moves on the board>

True, but what about your opponent?

(not in white/black order):

In Grischuk/Giri, Gris missed his chances.

In Grischuk/Aronian, Gris spotted his chances.

In Grischuk/Carlsen, Gris missed his chances.

<I- and only I - am responsible for my moves on the board> ...assumes you will be punished for a mistake.
That's not necessarily the case, and where "luck" comes into play.

Dec-20-15  Absentee: <diceman: <I- and only I - am responsible for my moves on the board> ...assumes you will be punished for a mistake. That's not necessarily the case, and where "luck" comes into play.>

It's your opponent's skill that comes into play in that case.

Dec-20-15  Absentee: <Shams: <BOSTER> I found this but it's confusing: http://www.angelfire.com/games5/che...

I remember the discussion right after the game was played: it was confirmed that Nakamura would have been warned, not forfeited. I assume they were using FIDE's official rules, since it was the World Cup.

Dec-20-15  BOSTER: According to Chess Life < it was noted by the appeal commitee that Naka had moved his rook first, also illegal under FIDE laws>.
Dec-20-15  Absentee: <BOSTER: According to Chess Life < it was noted by the appeal commitee that Naka had moved his rook first, also illegal under FIDE laws>.>

The question isn't whether it was legal or not, it is what penalty it would have entailed.

Dec-20-15  schweigzwang: Sounds like the discussion of the London Chess Classic has run its course. It was SO dull! let's talk about Nakamura.
Dec-20-15  epistle: He is always dull outside of chess
Dec-20-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: Carlsen was really clutch & showed great nerves
at the end of this tournament. He won 2 out of his last 3 classical games to get to the rapid tiebreak & win the tournament!
Dec-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Clemens Scheitz: <Gypsy>, no ifs or buts, my view is that all human undertakings are in the realm where skill and luck combine.>

<Clemens Scheitz: ...and skill requires luck, but luck works in mysterious ways...>

Amen to all of that.

Dec-26-15  rayoflight: Could you please put link of PGN for tie-break games? I cannot find them!!!
Dec-26-15  zanzibar: <rayoflight> Google quickly comes up with:

http://www.londonchessclassic.com/r...

http://www.londonchessclassic.com/p... (direct pgn download)

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