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🏆 World Cup (2017)

  PARTICIPANTS (sorted by highest achieved rating; click on name to see player's games)
Magnus Carlsen, Fabiano Caruana, Levon Aronian, Wesley So, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Viswanathan Anand, Vladimir Kramnik, Hikaru Nakamura, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Alexander Grischuk, Anish Giri, Teimour Radjabov, Sergey Karjakin, Vassily Ivanchuk, Ding Liren, Boris Gelfand, Peter Svidler, Ruslan Ponomariov, Ian Nepomniachtchi, Pentala Harikrishna, Pavel Eljanov, Michael Adams, Evgeny Tomashevsky, Li Chao, Wei Yi, Richard Rapport, Wang Hao, David Navara, Radoslaw Wojtaszek, Yu Yangyi, Etienne Bacrot, Nikita Vitiugov, Le Quang Liem, Maxim Matlakov, Dmitry Andreikin, Baadur Jobava, Vladimir Fedoseev, Ernesto Inarkiev, Bu Xiangzhi, Francisco Vallejo Pons, Vidit Santosh Gujrathi, Laurent Fressinet, Alexander Areshchenko, Lazaro Bruzon Batista, Ivan Cheparinov, David Howell, Alexey Dreev, Sergei Zhigalko, Alexander Motylev, Maxim Rodshtein, Jan-Krzysztof Duda, Liviu Dieter Nisipeanu, Evgeny Najer, Boris Grachev, Igor Kovalenko, Alexander Onischuk, Bassem Amin, Vladislav Artemiev, Yuri Kuzubov, Baskaran Adhiban, Yifan Hou, Aleksej Aleksandrov, David Anton Guijarro, Hrant Melkumyan, Daniil Dubov, Martyn Kravtsiv, Gawain Jones, Jeffery Xiong, Varuzhan Akobian, Daniel Fridman, Kacper Piorun, Sandro Mareco, Anton Kovalyov, Ngoc Truongson Nguyen, Mikhael Mchedlishvili, Luka Lenic, Viktor Erdos, Sethuraman P Sethuraman, Jorge Cori, Anton Demchenko, Axel Bachmann Schiavo, Emilio Cordova, Alexandr Hilario Takeda dos Santos Fier, Murtas Kazhgaleyev, Ivan Salgado Lopez, Matthias Bluebaum, Johann Hjartarson, Alexey Goganov, Robert Hovhannisyan, Aleksandr Lenderman, Neuris Delgado Ramirez, Dimitrios Mastrovasilis, Levan Pantsulaia, Samuel Sevian, Mladen Palac, Benjamin Bok, Diego Flores, Julio Catalino Sadorra, Kaido Kulaots, Aryan Tari, Deep Sengupta, Vitaly Kunin, Mikhail Antipov, Kirill Stupak, Jahongir Vakhidov, Murali Karthikeyan, Yusnel Bacallao Alonso, Nana Dzagnidze, Tsegmed Batchuluun, Bator Sambuev, Yuri Gonzalez Vidal, Helgi Dam Ziska, Leandro Krysa, Amirreza Pourramezanali, Felipe de Cresce El Debs, Al Rakib Mollah Abdullah, Essam El Gindy, Mohamed Amine Haddouche, Anton Smirnov, Li Tian Yeoh, Muhammad Khusenkhojaev, Kenneth T Solomon, Guanchu Liu, Daniel J Cawdery, Changren Dai, Joshua Daniel Ruiz Castillo, Oluwafemi Balogun

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
World Cup (2017)

128 of the world's strongest players meet in Tbilisi, Georgia to compete in a knockout event, starting on Sep 3rd, through to Sep 27th. Top seeds include Carlsen, So, Caruana, Kramnik, Aronian, Mamedyarov, Nakamura, Vachier-Lagrave, Anand, Ding Liren, Grischuk, Karjakin, Giri, Wei Yi, Svidler, et al.

Official Site: http://tbilisi2017.fide.com

Pairings Tree: http://tbilisi2017.fide.com/wp-cont...

Wikipedia page (including results): Wikipedia article: Chess World Cup 2017

 page 1 of 18; games 1-25 of 430  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Areshchenko vs A Demchenko 1-0762017World CupB51 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
2. Ding Liren vs M Haddouche 1-0462017World CupE60 King's Indian Defense
3. Li Tian Yeoh vs Anand 0-1662017World CupB22 Sicilian, Alapin
4. Grischuk vs E El Gindy 1-0472017World CupC24 Bishop's Opening
5. Changren Dai vs Kramnik 0-1512017World CupC95 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Breyer
6. A Bachmann vs Dreev 0-1412017World CupB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
7. K Piorun vs Yifan Hou  ½-½402017World CupE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
8. L Bruzon Batista vs D Anton Guijarro 1-0452017World CupC67 Ruy Lopez
9. D Dubov vs D Fridman  ½-½362017World CupE04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
10. R Rapport vs E Cordova 1-0332017World CupE01 Catalan, Closed
11. S Sevian vs Nisipeanu  ½-½212017World CupC42 Petrov Defense
12. A Tari vs D Howell  ½-½292017World CupC45 Scotch Game
13. E Inarkiev vs M Mchedlishvili 1-0292017World CupB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
14. D Sengupta vs Wang Hao  ½-½342017World CupC50 Giuoco Piano
15. Bu Xiangzhi vs D Flores 1-0232017World CupA04 Reti Opening
16. A Giri vs N Dzagnidze 1-0672017World CupA27 English, Three Knights System
17. Adams vs T Batchuluun  ½-½572017World CupC50 Giuoco Piano
18. Eljanov vs Lenderman 0-1572017World CupE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
19. J Cori vs G Jones 1-0972017World CupE60 King's Indian Defense
20. I Kovalenko vs M Kravtsiv 0-1712017World CupC89 Ruy Lopez, Marshall
21. F Vallejo Pons vs M Karthikeyan 1-0642017World CupE10 Queen's Pawn Game
22. Li Chao vs L Krysa  ½-½1132017World CupD25 Queen's Gambit Accepted
23. A Pourramezanali vs Yu Yangyi  ½-½712017World CupA45 Queen's Pawn Game
24. L Lenic vs Fressinet  ½-½442017World CupD52 Queen's Gambit Declined
25. Y Kuzubov vs S Zhigalko  ½-½542017World CupD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
 page 1 of 18; games 1-25 of 430  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 22 OF 132 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <Regarding the above comment regarding "what happened to Shirov", one must remember that he's now...45.>

The second round here features quite many players older than Shirov is. Sorted by age these are Gelfand, Dreev, Ivanchuk, Anand and Adams. And with exception of Dreev they are all higher seeds in their 2nd round matches!

Sep-05-17  Nf8: <AylerKupp> I was talking about <Carlsen "qualifying" to the Candidates by rating (due to his participation in the World Cup), <and having to be replaced if he doesn't participate>> - that's the possibility which is actually realistic and likely to have some consequences, while the possibility that Carlsen would want to participate in the Candidates is extremely unlikely and good mostly for a few jokes (which have already became rather tiresome - what happens if he wins and plays a match against himself etc. etc.).

My point is that since he isn't considered as a potential qualifier, his non-participation would not require a replacement, which according to the regulations is supposed to be the 3rd in the final Grand Prix standings (as <devere> mentioned, according to section 2.6 of the regulations). This is also proven, btw, by FIDE's official announcement that if Carlsen reaches the World Cup finals there will be a match for 3rd place to determine a second qualifier for the Candidates - again, it indicates that Carlsen simply isn't considered a potential qualifier (otherwise his replacement should have come, again, from the GP standings).

Btw, I don't see any reason whatsoever to seriously think Carlsen would actually <want> to play in the Candidates - he's quite clearly playing in the World Cup not in order to "qualify" for anything, but mostly because he likes its special format and wants to show his superiority there. But even if he does, at worst it can be prevented by invoking section 1.5, "At any time in the course of the application of these Regulations, any circumstances that are not covered or any unforeseen event shall be referred to the President of FIDE for final decision" - his wanting to participate falling under "circumstances that are not covered."

Having said all that, the regulations are obviously lacking in their current form and should be phrased more explicitly with regard to what the World Champion can and cannot do within the cycle.

Sep-05-17  Arconax: <Marmot PFL: Someone ran 20,000 simulations (should be more like 200,000 I think) and came up with these winners - Carlsen 13.4% (too low IMHO, I would say about 20-25%) So, Nakamura 6.8%, Caruana 6.5%, Aronian 6.4%, Kramnik 6.3%, Vachier-Lagrave 5.2%, Karjakin 4.1%, Anand 4.0% etc. total is here>

Interesting how some players are consistently overrated, while others are (almost) always underrated. For instance, even if Wesley So at the moment has a higher ELO than Sergey Karjakin, I would prefer Karjakin's chances over So's in this tournament. Young Wesley showed terrible form in the recent Sinquefield Cup, while Karjakin is the Vice World Champion and winner of the last World Cup. A much better bet than the unreliable Filipino-American.

Sep-05-17  rogge: <Nf8>, precisely. Good post.
Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: I would favor So over Karjakin (not heavily though) partly because of a favorable path where the first really tough obstacle seems to be Naka in rd 5.

Karjakin struggled already, and potentially has to face Radjabov and Aronian in rds 3 and 4

Sep-05-17  Arconax: <Marmot PFL: I would favor So over Karjakin (not heavily though) partly because of a favorable path..>

In that case you may be correct. I did not consider the tournament set up, not having paid attention to it. Aronian will certainly be a handful in rd4 if Karjakin gets that far. I'm pretty sure he will defeat the Azeri Radjabov, though.

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Nf8> Well, at the risk of adding to the tiresomeness (which I will, of course, attribute to "jet lag"), the fact that Carlsen is not considered a qualifier by FIDE seems to me to be FIDE's problem, not Carlsen's. Under FIDE's current qualification rules he DOES indeed qualify to play in the 2018 Candidates Tournament as a result of (most likely) having the highest average rating in the Jan-2017 through Dec-2017 plus participating in the 2017 World Cup. Then again, this wouldn't be the first time that FIDE has ignored its own rules when it suits the powers that be, and I suspect that it wouldn't be the last.

And I missed FIDE's official announcement that if Carlsen reaches the World Cup finals there will be a match for 3rd place to determine a second qualifier for the Candidates. When and on what basis did that happen? Do you have any links to that announcement? At any rate, Carlsen would not need to reach the World Cup finals to qualify to the 2018 Candidates tournament by rating, so this announcement is not really relevant.

As far as Carlsen not having a reason to play in the Candidates, I can think of four: (1) he likes playing chess at the top level, (2) he's indicated that he hasn't been playing well lately and wants to fine-tune his game, and what better way to do that than to play in a tournament against the world's top players? (3) if he plays and wins the tournament he will have a psychological advantage against whoever his challenger is since he will have demonstrated that he's better, (4) the prize money isn't bad, $ 95,000 euros for first place. And, if he plays and doesn't do well, he can always say that he was "hiding his prep" :-)

As far as invoking section 1.5, what reason would the president of FIDE have for wanting to prevent Carlsen from playing in the Candidates Tournament? I know, FIDE can be arbitrary but he should state a reason, hopefully a plausible one. I think I've already addressed any rejection using the "unforeseen event" clause.

And, of course, you're right, the rules should be more explicit. Simply stating in the Rules and Regulations for the FIDE World Championship cycle that the World Champion is not eligible to participate in the Candidates Tournament should be enough.

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tuttifrutty: Aronian, LQL.\, Wesley...on to the next round. I'm happy.
Sep-05-17  markz: <Marmot PFL: Someone ran 20,000 simulations (should be more like 200,000 I think) and came up with these winners -

Carlsen 13.4% (too low IMHO, I would say about 20-25%) So, Nakamura 6.8%, Caruana 6.5%, Aronian 6.4%, Kramnik 6.3%, Vachier-Lagrave 5.2%, Karjakin 4.1%, Anand 4.0% etc.>

It seems that the simulation use August rating not September rating, and use URS rating for rapid and blitz, which are in question. Taking these into account, I think the odds should be something like:

Carlsen 16%, Nakamura 8.5%, Aronian, MVL, Kramnik 6.5%, So, Caruana 6%, Karjakin 5%, Aanad 4%

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tuttifrutty: <As far as Carlsen not having a reason to play in the Candidates, I can think of four: (1) he likes playing chess at the top level, (2) he's indicated that he hasn't been playing well lately and wants to fine-tune his game, and what better way to do that than to play in a tournament against the world's top players? (3) if he plays and wins the tournament he will have a psychological advantage against whoever his challenger is since he will have demonstrated that he's better, (4) the prize money isn't bad, $ 95,000 euros for first place. And, if he plays and doesn't do well, he can always say that he was "hiding his prep" :-)>

I agree with 1..2...3.. but no. 4 reason is a stinking horse manure. Especially when he personally said...

" It's nice to be financially secure but aside from that, I don't really care much about money."

I am very sure rogge...domdaniel(crybaby) and the rest of <the bad people> will now have another selective amnesia....as usual.

No balls...queers...hahaha

Sep-05-17  starry2013: Very glad Amin was eliminated, after having lost the first rapid he rather desperately claimed a win in the second based on his opponent promoting using two hands.
Sep-05-17  ketchuplover: Sounds legit to me
Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bobby Fiske: <Sally†Simpson:>and each will pick up a cheque for $10,000. First round losers got $6,000> Do they really receive $6000 just for showing up for R1? I thought it was reserved for the winners of R1?
Sep-05-17  Arconax: <starry2013: Very glad Amin was eliminated, after having lost the first rapid he rather desperately claimed a win in the second based on his opponent promoting using two hands.>

As they say in Denmark: -sludder og vrÝvl! This isn't skittles my friend, this is the World Cup, where a lot is at stake, money & prestige. Of course if your opponent breaks the rules, you should call him on it as Amin did.

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  PhilFeeley: It's good to see Kovalyov advancing, but now he faces Anand. Maybe he can catch him on a bad day ;-)

I'm looking forward to the American vs. the Cuban next round.

Sep-05-17  optimal play: <SirBrainless> Anton Smirnov and Sergey Karjakin aren't compatriots.
Sep-05-17  Sally Simpson: Hi Bobby Fiske.

http://www.fide.com/FIDE/handbook/W...

Round 1 losers: 64 x USD 6,000.

Sep-05-17  Sally Simpson: Amin and the double hand promotion.

The terms for this event are here.

http://www.fide.com/FIDE/handbook/W...

At the bottom it does state they are using FIDE rules as of the 1st July 2017.

so we go here:

http://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.h...

Rapid play rules:

A.4.2: "If the arbiter observes an illegal move has been completed, he shall declare the game lost by the player."

The Blitz rules are condensed basically using rapid rules with a few minor changes. But it does say:

B.4: Otherwise, play shall be governed by the Rapid chess Laws as in Article A.2 and A.4. (an illegal move loses.)

And here is the rule regarding using two hands.

7.7.1
If a player uses two hands to make a single move (in case of castling, capturing or promotion), it shall be considered as an illegal move.

Therefore Amin possibly had a point and it may be appealed.

Sep-05-17  Arconax: <Sally Simpson: Therefore Amin possibly had a point and it may be appealed.>

If only his grandfather Idi was still alive..

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<tuttifrutty> I agree with 1..2...3.. but no. 4 reason is a stinking horse manure.>

OK, I agree with that. I guess that we'll then have to consider reason 4 to be "gravy" in case he decides to play because of one of the other 3 reasons.

Sep-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  SirRuthless: <optimal play> Oops I read that as Anton Korobov who is Ukranian, just like Sergey

:D

Sep-05-17  Sally Simpson: HI Arconax.

:)

Usually after a game is over it's over but Amin raised his objection at the right time. The arbiter, an employee of FIDE may have got it wrong, and if...

(notice I am using 'if' 'perhaps' and 'maybe' I'm not 100% sure)

...and if Amin appeals then I don't think they will order a blitz rematch (they might) but instead bung some him cash, an extra $4,000 which brings his purse up $10,00 the 2nd round exit fee and add back on any rating points lost.

Sep-05-17  Sally Simpson: Hi Sir Ruthless,

Don't bend the knee so easily.

compatriots. = fellow countryman. Both were born in the Ukraine so they are compatriots. The play for different chess federations.

Now get back in the ring and tell him.

Sep-05-17  optimal play: <Silly Simpson> I'm under the impression Anton Smirnov was born in Australia where he has lived all his life (although his father was born in Russia), but if it can be shown that he was actually born in Ukraine (or even Russia) then I will acknowledge that he and Karjakin could be called compatriots and apologise to <SirRuthless>.
Sep-05-17  markz: <Sally Simpson: Therefore Amin possibly had a point and it may be appealed.>

World cup use the classical rules. chess.com explained it as following: <However, at World Cups the same rules are in effect for all time controls, to avoid confusion for the players. Therefore, also in tiebreaks, at the first occurrence an illegal move will lead to a warning and the opponent receives two minutes extra on the clock.>

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