chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

There are 3 clues unsolved right now on the Holiday Contest Clues Page!   [Official Contest Rules]

🏆
TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Your Next Move (Rapid) Tournament

Wesley So7/9(+5 -0 =4)[games]
Levon Aronian5.5/9(+3 -1 =5)[games]
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave5.5/9(+2 -0 =7)[games]
Sergey Karjakin5/9(+2 -1 =6)[games]
Hikaru Nakamura5/9(+4 -3 =2)[games]
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov4.5/9(+2 -2 =5)[games]
Alexander Grischuk4/9(+2 -3 =4)[games]
Fabiano Caruana3.5/9(+3 -5 =1)[games]
Viswanathan Anand2.5/9(+1 -5 =3)[games]
Anish Giri2.5/9(+1 -5 =3)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Your Next Move (Rapid) (2018)

Played in Leuven, Belgium, 12-14 June, as part of the first leg of the Grand Chess Tour 2018. The ten participants first played nine games of rapid chess (25 min + 10 sec/move, this page) then 18 games of blitz (see Your Next Move (Blitz) (2018)), for a total prize fund of $150,000. Wesley So won the rapid with 7/9. Crosstable:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Pts 1 So * 1 1 1 1 1 7 14 =2 Aronian * 0 1 1 1 5 11 =2 Vachier-Lagrave * 1 1 5 11 =4 Karjakin 1 * 1 0 5 10 =4 Nakamura 0 0 * 1 1 0 1 1 5 10 6 Mamedyarov 0 0 * 1 1 4 9 7 Grischuk 0 0 0 * 1 1 4 8 8 Caruana 0 0 1 1 0 0 * 0 1 3 7 =9 Anand 0 0 0 0 1 * 0 2 5 =9 Giri 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 2 5

Combined with the blitz chess (Your Next Move (Blitz) (2018)), the overall event was won by Wesley So with 22 points using the scoring system which weighted rapid games twice as much as blitz.

Official site: https://grandchesstour.org/2018-gra...

TWIC: http://theweekinchess.com/chessnews...

Chess.com report: https://www.chess.com/news/view/so-...

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1h7...

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Aronian vs Nakamura 1-0712018Your Next Move (Rapid)A14 English
2. Anand vs Aronian  ½-½542018Your Next Move (Rapid)C67 Ruy Lopez
3. Grischuk vs Caruana 1-0362018Your Next Move (Rapid)C42 Petrov Defense
4. Mamedyarov vs A Giri ½-½282018Your Next Move (Rapid)D31 Queen's Gambit Declined
5. Nakamura vs Karjakin  ½-½502018Your Next Move (Rapid)C65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
6. M Vachier-Lagrave vs W So  ½-½442018Your Next Move (Rapid)E21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
7. Caruana vs M Vachier-Lagrave  ½-½432018Your Next Move (Rapid)E60 King's Indian Defense
8. Karjakin vs Grischuk 1-0482018Your Next Move (Rapid)C53 Giuoco Piano
9. W So vs Mamedyarov 1-0522018Your Next Move (Rapid)E04 Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3
10. Caruana vs W So 0-1482018Your Next Move (Rapid)C78 Ruy Lopez
11. Anand vs Mamedyarov 0-1512018Your Next Move (Rapid)B29 Sicilian, Nimzovich-Rubinstein
12. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Karjakin  ½-½1042018Your Next Move (Rapid)C53 Giuoco Piano
13. Nakamura vs A Giri  1-0412018Your Next Move (Rapid)D00 Queen's Pawn Game
14. Grischuk vs Aronian  ½-½332018Your Next Move (Rapid)A45 Queen's Pawn Game
15. A Giri vs Anand 1-0412018Your Next Move (Rapid)C82 Ruy Lopez, Open
16. Nakamura vs M Vachier-Lagrave  ½-½342018Your Next Move (Rapid)B50 Sicilian
17. Anand vs Caruana 1-0572018Your Next Move (Rapid)B42 Sicilian, Kan
18. W So vs Aronian  ½-½452018Your Next Move (Rapid)E06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
19. Karjakin vs A Giri  ½-½342018Your Next Move (Rapid)C42 Petrov Defense
20. Caruana vs Mamedyarov 0-1482018Your Next Move (Rapid)C60 Ruy Lopez
21. M Vachier-Lagrave vs Anand 1-0512018Your Next Move (Rapid)C67 Ruy Lopez
22. Grischuk vs Nakamura 0-1412018Your Next Move (Rapid)C67 Ruy Lopez
23. A Giri vs Aronian  0-1462018Your Next Move (Rapid)C67 Ruy Lopez
24. Mamedyarov vs Karjakin ½-½1232018Your Next Move (Rapid)E37 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
25. W So vs A Giri 1-0572018Your Next Move (Rapid)A15 English
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 45  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  


TIP: You can make the above ads go away by registering a free account!

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <jb> yeah, I changed my post because the first version was ambiguous. :)

I just meant to say that regardless of whether it was Judit or Susan there (I didn't watch, so I want to avoid seemingly commenting on that part), Judit Polgar's name has never been "Judith".

Judit <is> the Hungarian equivalent of the English Judith, but we don't take the liberty of renaming other players because their names have English equivalents - or we'd be talking about "Michael/Mike" Tal, "Joseph/Joe" Capablanca, "Victor" Korchnoi, "William/Bill" Steinitz etc.

Jun-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <Annie K>

My best (female) friend from 67-69 was Rita from Hungary. As Denmark took many refugees.Every day we took our bikes to school and also made some homework.But more often we listened to Beatles,Stones,Kinks etc. Those were the days :)

Jun-14-18  yhehy: GM WiseLey , AlphaSo Mode :))
Jun-14-18  Conrad93: Wesley So is top 2-3 in almost every rating category.

It's crazy how the the U.S. has three players in the top ten.

Jun-15-18  paavoh: Intriguingly, more Black than White wins (if I counted them properly).
Jun-15-18  jphamlore: Wesley So has an amazing capacity to self-correct something that is a problem with his chess game. I just wish he had had someone he could have trusted to be his trainer through Candidates.
Jun-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Annie K.> "William" <was> Steinitz's first name in the latter part of his life. As chessgames.com's bio of the man says, Wilhelm Steinitz <emigrated to the USA in 1883, taking out US citizenship, living in New York for the rest of his life, and changing his first name to "William".>
Jun-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <paavoh: Intriguingly, more Black than White wins (if I counted them properly).>

You're right - 13-12! I can't imagine that there are many tournaments, at whatever time control, where Black wins more often than White. See generally my award-winning Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First.... Remarkable.

Jun-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  gregory2188: Congrats GM Wesley So! Well done!
Hello chess lovers. Anyone knows where to play chess in Edinburgh 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿. Im just one avid chess patzer who loves losing as much as winning. 😂
Jun-15-18  jphamlore: Is Nakamura going to be spending an extra day in Belgium so that he is as rested as possible for his stunt match with various versions of Komodo?

https://www.chess.com/news/view/nak...

Even if the event is a farce, at least let Nakamura be at somewhat close to a rested optimal state.

Jun-15-18  paavoh: @FSR: Thanks for the link to your <Wikipedia article>, an impressive essay indeed!

My limited experience is that when I'm White, Black usually equalizes but when I have the Black pieces, I struggle to do the same...

Jun-15-18  WorstPlayerEver: The point is a mathematical one: obviously a game is drawn if both opponents play the correct moves.

Therefore the wiki article is greatly insufficient; human stats don't mean a thing in theory!

For instance: humans 'assume' (read: they don't know in fact) that opening theory has reached 'its limits.'

Complete nonsense! Zum beispiel: the variation 1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nf3 3. Bg2 Bd6 is not found in any database.

However, I let the engine run for a few days and you know what? SF thinks it's the best continuation (41 ply)!

In fact, just a matter of effort, the chess game IS solved; any game is a draw in theory.

Jun-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <WorstPlayerEver: The point is a mathematical one: obviously a game is drawn if both opponents play the correct moves.>

That's not obvious at all. I'm sure there are lots of bad openings that lose despite optimal play. For example , what about the Kamikaze opening 1. e4 f5 2. Nc3 g5? You can say that 2. Nc3 isn't the best move for black but bad openings are bad for that very reason, so you would have to assume no bad openings exist to support that hypothesis.

<FSR> <Annie K.> "William" <was> Steinitz's first name in the latter part of his life. As chessgames.com's bio of the man says, Wilhelm Steinitz <emigrated to the USA in 1883, taking out US citizenship, living in New York for the rest of his life, and changing his first name to "William".>

That's not entirely accurate, because most people called him <Billy-Boy Steinitz> or <Wild Bill Steinitz>, depending on the source.

Jun-15-18  john barleycorn: <WorstPlayerEver: The point is a mathematical one: obviously a game is drawn if both opponents play the correct moves.>

They have to play the correct move at the right time. A correct move at the wrong time may be a wrong move.

Jun-15-18  WorstPlayerEver: I guess it's my obsession with perfection ;)
Jun-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: OK, when a player actually changes their name, that's a different story. :)

For another example, so did Susan Polgar, which is why even I don't call her Zsuzsa anymore. ;p

But Judit didn't change her name, so, not to lose the point, she shouldn't be called "Judith", just like Mikhail (or Misha) Tal is never called Michael or Mike.

Jun-15-18  spazzky: Bill Steinitz reporting in... So's sweep if the tourney ended today with 2 losses.
Jun-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: <ChessHigherCat: ... That's not entirely accurate, because most people called him <Billy-Boy Steinitz> or <Wild Bill Steinitz>, depending on the source.>

LOL. - Coming up:
Manny Lasker
Ziggy Tarrasch
Joe Capablanca
Al Alekhine
Mike Botvinnik (sorry, <Annie K>)

But also surnames, Russian in particular, are prone to the transscription rules of each language. In Germany and Scandinavia Alekhine (Але́хин) is transscribed to Aljechin, and suffixes with -sky becomes -skij.

Well, in my birth town Haderslev there was a family living in a small city house. The namesplate on their front door said: Kxdzierzykowsky. Go pronuouncing that!

Jun-16-18  john barleycorn: <Sokrates: <ChessHigherCat: ... That's not entirely accurate, because most people called him <Billy-Boy Steinitz> ...>

Steinitz, being the 9th child out of 13 the <Billy-Boy> characterization may be not too fitting.

Jun-16-18  siamesedream: Congratulations to <GM Wesley So>!
Jun-17-18  QueentakesKing: I am still not impress with Wesley. He has to win at least 3 tournaments in a row to have my nod.
Jun-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: A fine victory for Mr So, although it's "only" a rapid tournament. In classical chess his results have been less impressive of late. Perhaps this victory will boost his self-confidence.
Jun-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dfb2YO3...
Jun-30-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  tuttifrutty: hmmm....I see Wesley topping this portion again. A truly remarkable achievement...there's no doubt he is the god in the world of Rapid chess. Amen...
Jun-30-18  epistle: Rapids. At least he is good at something
Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 3)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific tournament and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC