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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
43rd Chess Olympiad Tournament

Andre Stratonowitsch9.5/11(+8 -0 =3)[games]
Mashala Kabamwanishi9.5/10(+9 -0 =1)[games]
Anish Giri8.5/11(+6 -0 =5)[games]
Nodirbek Yakubboev8.5/10(+7 -0 =3)[games]
Amir Zaibi8.5/11(+6 -0 =5)[games]
Ngoc Truongson Nguyen8.5/10(+7 -0 =3)[games]
Nils Grandelius8.5/11(+6 -0 =5)[games]
Ebrima Bah8/11(+8 -3 =0)[games]
Montasar Abo Moliana8/11(+7 -2 =2)[games]
Dejan Marjanovic8/11(+7 -2 =2)[games]
Yusup Atabayev8/11(+5 -0 =6)[games]
Asyl Abdyjapar8/10(+7 -1 =2)[games]
Mircea-Emilian Parligras8/10(+6 -0 =4)[games]
Diego Flores8/10(+7 -1 =2)[games]
Basher Iyti8/10(+8 -2 =0)[games]
Lewis Martin8/11(+7 -2 =2)[games]
Giorgi Sibashvili8/9(+8 -1 =0)[games]
Jure Skoberne8/11(+7 -2 =2)[games]
Raymond Song8/11(+6 -1 =4)[games]
Alireza Firouzja8/11(+6 -1 =4)[games]
Bader Al-Hajiri7.5/10(+6 -1 =3)[games]
Julio Catalino Sadorra7.5/11(+5 -1 =5)[games]
Urtnasan Nasanjargal7.5/9(+6 -0 =3)[games]
Ilya Yulyevich Smirin7.5/9(+6 -0 =3)[games]
Rodwell Makoto7.5/10(+7 -2 =1)[games]
Ferenc Berkes7.5/10(+6 -1 =3)[games]
Bu Xiangzhi7.5/10(+5 -0 =5)[games]
Martin Walker7.5/10(+6 -1 =3)[games]
Jonathan Westerberg7.5/9(+6 -0 =3)[games]
(909 players total; 880 players not shown. Click here for longer list.)

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
43rd Chess Olympiad (2018)

The 43rd FIDE World Chess Olympiad took place from 24 September to 5 October 2018 in Batumi, Georgia. The biennial tournament was an 11-round Swiss open, with one rest day on 29 September. The Open section featured 185 teams from 183 countries, with the 919 players including almost the whole world chess elite, and there was also a Women's section: 43rd Chess Olympiad (Women) (2018).

The time control was 90 minutes for 40 moves then 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1. Each team consisted of five players, with four playing each match. Draw offers were not allowed until move 30. The standings were determined by match points, with 2 points for a win and 1 for a draw; then modified Sonneborn-Berger scores (match points of each opponent, excluding the opponent who scored the lowest number of match points, multiplied by the number of game points in the match against the opponent); then game points. (1)

The first ten rounds started at 15:00 local time (13:00 CEST; 11:00 UTC; 07:00 USA/Eastern); the final round began at 11:00 local time.

China ended up taking double gold in this event by dominating the Women's section and edging out the United States with a tiebreak in the Open section, while Russia took third place.

Official site: http://batumi2018.fide.com/
Pairings and results: http://chess-results.com/tnr368908....

(1) Chess24: Batumi Chess Olympiad https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...

 page 1 of 161; games 1-25 of 4,016  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Mahdi Kaouri vs Tiviakov  0-134201843rd Chess OlympiadB73 Sicilian, Dragon, Classical
2. Harikrishna vs Jorge Ernesto Giron  1-033201843rd Chess OlympiadC10 French
3. M M Aithmidou vs Li Chao 1-087201843rd Chess OlympiadB20 Sicilian
4. Bu Xiangzhi vs Y Saber 1-031201843rd Chess OlympiadA07 King's Indian Attack
5. W So vs Roberto Sanchez Alvarez 1-034201843rd Chess OlympiadB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
6. Efran Andres Ramos vs Robson 45201843rd Chess OlympiadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
7. C Burgos Figueroa vs Krishnan Sasikirian ½-½52201843rd Chess OlympiadA25 English
8. Vianney Archeveq Koualet-Bebondi vs J Dempsey  0-162201843rd Chess OlympiadA45 Queen's Pawn Game
9. McShane vs Sergio Miguel ½-½51201843rd Chess OlympiadC50 Giuoco Piano
10. J Baules vs Nakamura 0-125201843rd Chess OlympiadE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
11. S Shankland vs Orlando Leon  1-039201843rd Chess OlympiadD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
12. Efren Andres Ramos vs Robson  0-163201843rd Chess OlympiadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
13. A Ssegwanyi vs Karjakin 0-131201843rd Chess OlympiadE54 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System
14. I Nepomniachtchi vs P Kawuma 1-029201843rd Chess OlympiadC11 French
15. Walter Okas vs Vitiugov  0-125201843rd Chess OlympiadA07 King's Indian Attack
16. Jakovenko vs Haruna Nsubuga 1-030201843rd Chess OlympiadB12 Caro-Kann Defense
17. Yu Yangyi vs M Tissir 1-044201843rd Chess OlympiadE73 King's Indian
18. A Onkoud vs Wei Yi  0-130201843rd Chess OlympiadA09 Reti Opening
19. A El Jawich vs L'Ami  0-127201843rd Chess OlympiadC44 King's Pawn Game
20. J van Foreest vs A Kassis  1-028201843rd Chess OlympiadB51 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
21. A Giri vs F Eid  1-028201843rd Chess OlympiadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
22. F Berkes vs Faniry Rajaonarison  ½-½60201843rd Chess OlympiadA49 King's Indian, Fianchetto without c4
23. Miora Andriamasoandro vs Z Almasi  0-136201843rd Chess OlympiadB20 Sicilian
24. F Rakotomaharo vs V Erdos  ½-½18201843rd Chess OlympiadC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
25. B Gledura vs Milanto Harifidy Ralison  1-038201843rd Chess OlympiadA05 Reti Opening
 page 1 of 161; games 1-25 of 4,016  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  


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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 37 OF 37 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <Well, here you are: https://www.google.no/url?sa=t&sour... Its actually based on an English original.>

Thanks <Diademas> !

Very funny and I see were Marve is comming from.Till 2 minuttes ago he was always some of the most norwegian comedian I have come across...

But he still is :)

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <Diademas> An English Fleksnes? Wow, cool. I didn't even remember that it was based on an English original. Thanks for posting that link, looking forward to view that episode. Shall be fun to spot the differences (and similarities). Fleksnes is a national treasure.
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <Sokrates: NYNORSK ("new Norwegian") which, in fact, is the old Norwegian from the valleys and hamlets in western Norway. It is the basic for Icelandish, since the settlers of Iceland in 7-800 primarily came from Norway.>

That's not entirely true.
Nynorsk came about as an amalgamation of dialects spoken in rural Norway (mainly Western Noreway and Telemark) in the latter part of the 19th century.

Icelandic started up in the middle ages as what Norweians were speaking at the time (Old Norse*).

The Norwegian language has changed much more than Icelandic in the meantime, so Icelandic is much closer to what our ancestors spoke and wrote than both Nynorsk and Bokmål.

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_N...

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: A more modern Norwegian comic approach to the Danish language. ;)

https://youtube.com/watch?v=s-mOy8V...

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  rogge: A classic :)
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <Count Wedgemore: My wife is from Italy, but has now lived in Norway for more than thirty years. She speaks Bokmål fluently, she's even basically lost her (for me enchanting and very charming..) distinct Italian accent over the years.>

I had an aunt who went completely the other way. She came from New York (originally Puerto Rico) in 1962, married my uncle, and lived here until she sadly passed away a few years ago. The longer she lived here, the more atrocious her accent became. Up to a point where we had to revert to speaking English with her.

We all found it endearing, but must have made her daily life a bit hard.

Ps! <She speaks Bokmål fluently> Technically Bokmål is a written standard, not a spoken one. As is Nynorsk.

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <Diademas: Ps! <She speaks Bokmål fluently> Technically Bokmål is a written standard, not a spoken one. As is Nynorsk.>>

Yeah, yeah, I know..! But it was in the context of explaining why she struggled with her understanding of Nynorsk.

Nobody likes a stickler (even though I am quite a bit of a stickler myself sometimes) :=

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <Diademas> I guess the correct thing would have to say that she (like me) speaks Standard Østnorsk which is the most common spoken form of Bokmål/Riksmål. But what do you call that in English? Standard East Norwegian? In English texts I've seen it referred to as Danish-Norwegian sometimes, which is really what it is, historically speaking.
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: < Count Wedgemore: <Diademas> I guess the correct thing would have to say that she (like me) speaks Standard Østnorsk which is the most common spoken form of Bokmål/Riksmål. But what do you call that in English? Standard East Norwegian? In English texts I've seen it referred to as Danish-Norwegian sometimes, which is really what it is, historically speaking.>

I'm not sure. Technically I guess I would say a "standard East Norwegian dialect", but there are differences even there. There are much variety between how someone from Fredrikstad and one from Gjøvik talks. Even a person from Bygdøy and one from Grorud speaks very differently.

Luckily not a problem where I am from! We know what we are ;) https://tv.kampanje.com/vg-med-elle...

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1g..., lol
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: <Diademas> Icelandic/Nynorsk. Thanks for detailing the history. It was actually what I meant by "basic". The original old Norse (norrøn) has survived relatively unchanged in Iceland due to its splendid isolation far away from main events in the history of Scandinavia - and in more recent times due to the extreme focus on preserving that language. It's a strict official policy to translate all foreign words into Icelandic. For instance: computer = tolva.

Contrary to that, Norway has been heavily influenced by its neighbor countries during those centuries, thus evidently prone to change. But the roots are the same, just as there still are reminiscents of ancient Nordic (norrøn) in Danish.

Well, diachronical language science is a huge and very interesting area, which, unfortunately, I haven't exercised since my candidate in Nordic Philology many decades ago :-)

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <Tabanus> LOL!!

<Diademas: Luckily not a problem where I am from! We know what we are ;)>

No! No Berxit!! #Better Together :)

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <Count Wedgemore: No! No Berxit!! #Better Together :)>

He He. Agreed!
I don't think, or hope, it will ever come to that, but I must admit I giggle every time I see the advertisement.

Especially the "Rhubarb test" ;)

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <Diademas> LOL. The whole idea is brilliant, really.
Oct-18-18  That Roger: So what do you guys think? Every possible series of moves white plays has drawable moves by black, or there is at least one undefendable, guaranteed win by white?
Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <So what do you guys think? Every possible series of moves white plays has drawable moves by black, or there is at least one undefendable, guaranteed win by white?>

If you are talking about the initial position the general knowledge says it is a draw,but white has a certain initiative,like the one who serves first in tennis.But there is no forced win for white.

Oct-18-18  That Roger: <But there is no forced win for white.> How is this known? So every white win by every +2700 elo player and engine in history has been analyzed for a good amount of time with engines that have found that black could have played moves to draw?

So every single possible line white can play can be drawn by black?

Maybe forcing is the wrong word because obviously when white makes a move black has non forced choice, but I guess the term is correct if in the scenario of considering the force being the absolute best move for black, if white can play a series of moves where the best engines and players in the world determine the best possible moves for black, and the outcome is a white win.

Oct-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Why waste time over trying to resolve that which, so far, has proven irresoluble? Chess is not a mathematical proof.
Oct-19-18  That Roger: <perfidious>
its merely a very interesting question because there must be an answer and it must be one or the other and I would like to know if any chess player here or person with extreme chess interest would have any educated guess or educated knowledge. Is it theoretically/practically impossible for there to be a forced/guaranteed/undefendable winning series of moves for white where black players the guaranteed absolutely proven best possible moves

And this line of thinking gets to the heart and soul of the totality of chess theory and opening repertoire, the history of forced lines, engine analysis, etc.

Oct-19-18  Absentee: <That Roger: <perfidious> its merely a very interesting question because there must be an answer and it must be one or the other and I would like to know if any chess player here or person with extreme chess interest would have any educated guess or educated knowledge. Is it theoretically/practically impossible for there to be a forced/guaranteed/undefendable winning series of moves for white where black players the guaranteed absolutely proven best possible moves

And this line of thinking gets to the heart and soul of the totality of chess theory and opening repertoire, the history of forced lines, engine analysis, etc.>

The answer equates to solving chess. It doesn't matter how interested or knowledgeable a player is, there's no such thing as an educated guess. It's a problem in combinatorics and one we're not even remotely close to approaching, never mind solving.

Oct-19-18  starry2013: Computers always say white has a very minor advantage on the opening move. I wonder how much that's just an automatic starting evaluation put in by the programmers.

People always say chess is a draw, and in theory every move can be equalised by black. White has the advantage of one tempo so I suppose the onus is on black to combat that. But it's conceivable that in some lines black might actually come up with something more surprising before white does. It's a game of thrust and counter-thrust but as a game goes on it must be harder for white to maintain the move advantage as the position slows down.

Oct-19-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <I wonder how much that's just an automatic starting evaluation put in by the programmers.>

I dont know(either) how the engines measure that,but in reality white is winning more games than black.As simple as that.(Everything equal). <but as a game goes on it must be harder for white to maintain the move advantage as the position slows down.>

Yes,this is the course of many games.

Oct-19-18  starry2013: I wonder how much psychology is involved as well though with some people thinking black is about just being defensive.
Oct-20-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <Sokrates: BOKMÅL ("book language") connected to the informal RIKSMÅL ("state language") is derived from Danish and the eastern part of ancient Nordic. It's the language of Ludvig Holberg, Henrik Ibsen and Knut Hamsun and today it is still dominating in a blended form with nynorsk>

Language in Norway has always been a hotly debated theme. After the start of the Kalmar Union (1397), amplified by the Reformation (1536) and cemented by absolutism in 1660, Danish became the only written standard in Norway. This continued all the way up to 1885 when by act of parliament, Nynorsk (Landsmål) and Riksmål (later Bokmål) both became official written standards.

Bokmål, as written today, is still very close to Danish. Any Norwegian can read a Danish text without problems, but may have a hard time deciphering spoken Danish.

Nynorsk: When this was introduced in the 1850s, in a wave of national sentiments, it got embraced by the cultural and economic elite. This would soon change.

Nobel prize winner Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson emerged as the champion for conservative forces that opposed this new direction. This controversy still lives. It reached its zenith in the 1950s, but is still a source of polarization amongst us.

My mother used to be a librarian at the University that holds a large collection dubbed the "Stridsarkivet" (the struggle files). This has nothing to do with the war, but all to with the irreconcilable fronts of this "language-war".

From around 1900, Bokmål has been seen as the sophisticated urban languge, and Nynorsk as its backward sibling. When I attended school in the 70s Nynorsk got the monicker "fjøslatin" (cowshed latin). Strangely this was in Bergen, a staunchly Bokmål city, even though our dialect is much closer to Nynorsk.

These sentiments still live, and Nynorsk has a low status in urban Norway.

<Well, diachronical language science is a huge and very interesting area>

Agreed!
If you want to continue this conversation, I suggest my forum. We are way off topic. It also has the added benefit of letting us communicate in Gods own language :)

Oct-20-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <That Roger:

So what do you guys think? Every possible series of moves white plays has drawable moves by black, or there is at least one undefendable, guaranteed win by white?>

White only has 1 tempo so it's doubtful he has a forced win.

Wins are typically created by:

1)missed tactics
2)structural weakness
3)lost material
4)poor planning
5)wasted tempo

None of that should happen with perfect play.

The interesting thing is, if there was
a forced win, black should win if he got to move first, since the position is symmetrical.

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