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Anand vs World Champs decisive games+ vs Asians
Compiled by visayanbraindoctor
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The Romance of the Chess World Championship Match and the World Champions that won them:

There can only be Two.

The Champion to hold the Title he beat all the masters for.

The Challenger on quest for same Title of yore.

Viswanathan Anand

Viswanathan Anand is a Tamil from Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; and is the first Tamil, Indian, and Asian to become Chess World Champion. I regard him as the greatest natural talent that the chess world has produced since Capablanca.

When in the zone, some chess players may experience a rare phenomenon. They see a chess game's variations as rapidly moving pictures flashing in and out of their mind's eye. When this occurs, you do not analyze in the traditional step by step manner: I move this, he moves that, in an iterative process. Instead, chess positions appear and disappear in your mind's eye very quickly. You stop analyzing as much as simply viewing these potential positions. Playing the game then becomes a matter of choosing which of these positions you go into.

I believe that this phenomenon has occurred to most chess players, but it does not happen all the time, or only rarely. However for chess players like Capablanca, and before him I believe Morphy, it occurred nearly all the time. This explains the rapidity in which they could hack their way through the weirdest and most bizarre middlegame complications with hardly an error.

Anand I believe has this rare ability to a degree better than any one else active today. It is a gift that cannot be taught. It's the reason why in crucial rapid tourneys, when he is motivated he has been able to impose his game on other players. It's the main reason IMO why he is so good in calculating variations in the middlegame.

Historically Anand has had the misfortune of rising during the peak of the Kasparov epoch. Against the master that many chess fans regard as the greatest chess player in history, Anand repeatedly went down with very little fight both in tournaments and in their 1995 World Championship match, some analysts saying that his obvious lack of confidence being the decisive factor. When he did gain the World Title, it was though a World Championship tournament FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007), which some chess fans do not regard as a legitimate way of selecting a Champion. In effect, Anand became a kind of semi World Champion, the holder of a devalued World Title.

Fortunately, history has righted itself. Anand decisively beat Kramnik, the previous Titleholder, in a World Championship match next year Anand - Kramnik World Championship Match (2008). This match definitively settles the question of who holds the Title. Anand has now become the Undisputed 15th World Chess Champion, at the relatively late age of 39. Better late than never.

After beating Kramnik, Anand seems to have suffered from a lack of motivation and confidence, again giving rise to talk about his lack of killer instinct mentality. He barely squeaked past Topalov by a point Anand - Topalov World Chess Championship (2010), and only when Topalov took risks in the last game probably in order to avoid quick games tiebreaks. He could only tie Gelfand Anand - Gelfand World Chess Championship (2012), retaining his title only in the quick games tiebreaks. He then decisively lost his Title to Carlsen Anand - Carlsen World Championship (2013), again playing with obvious loss of confidence. It was quite a surprise that Anand did pull his act together and proceeded to win the next Candidates tournament World Chess Championship Candidates (2014).

This game collection includes Anand vs World Champions decisive games and vs Asian GMs.

Viswanathan Anand tied Vasily Smyslov 0 to 0, with 2 draws

Viswanathan Anand beat Mikhail Tal 1 to 0, with 0 draw

Viswanathan Anand beat Boris Spassky 1 to 0, with 1 draw

Viswanathan Anand beat Anatoli Karpov 8 to 5, with 18 draws

Garry Kasparov beat Viswanathan Anand 16 to 6, with 32 draws

Viswanathan Anand beat Vladimir Kramnik 10 to 8, with 67 draws

Viswanathan Anand tied Magnus Carlsen 6 to 6, with 27 draws

I am trying to find Anand games vs Asian GMs, but the data base seems incomplete during his early years when he was still active in the Asian circuit. After 1990, we see Anand playing mostly in the European circuit.

Anand vs Spassky
Anand vs Spassky, 1989 
(C95) Ruy Lopez, Closed, Breyer, 51 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Tal
Tal vs Anand, 1989 
(A30) English, Symmetrical, 37 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov
Karpov vs Anand, 1991 
(E15) Queen's Indian, 53 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Karpov, 1991 
(B12) Caro-Kann Defense, 57 moves, 1-0

Karpov vs Anand, 1991 
(A04) Reti Opening, 46 moves, 0-1

Karpov vs Anand, 1991 
(D45) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 32 moves, 1-0

Karpov vs Anand, 1991 
(D45) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 70 moves, 0-1

Karpov vs Anand, 1991 
(D45) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 43 moves, 1-0

Karpov vs Anand, 1992 
(D47) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 50 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov, 1996 
(D21) Queen's Gambit Accepted, 36 moves, 1-0

Karpov vs Anand, 1998 
(D47) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 108 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Karpov, 1998 
(C78) Ruy Lopez, 42 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Karpov, 1998 
(B14) Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack, 49 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov, 1998 
(A45) Queen's Pawn Game, 42 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Karpov, 2003 
(B12) Caro-Kann Defense, 44 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kasparov
Kasparov vs Anand, 1991 
(C07) French, Tarrasch, 49 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Kasparov, 1991 
(B82) Sicilian, Scheveningen, 29 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1991 
(B48) Sicilian, Taimanov Variation, 29 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1992 
(D19) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch, 17 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1993 
(D19) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch, 65 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1994 
(B57) Sicilian, 35 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1995 
(C51) Evans Gambit, 25 moves, 1-0

World Championship 1995 round 9
Anand vs Kasparov, 1995 
(B84) Sicilian, Scheveningen, 35 moves, 1-0

World Championship 1995 round 10
Kasparov vs Anand, 1995 
(C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 38 moves, 1-0

World Championship 1995 round 11
Anand vs Kasparov, 1995 
(B78) Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long, 31 moves, 0-1

World Championship 1995 round 13
Anand vs Kasparov, 1995 
(B77) Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 25 moves, 0-1

World Championship 1995 round 14
Kasparov vs Anand, 1995 
(B01) Scandinavian, 41 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Anand, 1996 
(B13) Caro-Kann, Exchange, 36 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kasparov, 1997 
(B84) Sicilian, Scheveningen, 41 moves, 0-1

Kasparov vs Anand, 1998 
(B17) Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation, 35 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kasparov, 1999 
(B90) Sicilian, Najdorf, 50 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Kasparov, 2000 
(B92) Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation, 32 moves, 0-1

Kasparov vs Anand, 2003 
(B19) Caro-Kann, Classical, 62 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik
Kramnik vs Anand, 1996 
(A04) Reti Opening, 108 moves, 0-1

Kramnik vs Anand, 1996 
(A30) English, Symmetrical, 41 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 1996 
(D85) Grunfeld, 101 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 1997 
(D43) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 42 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Kramnik, 1998 
(C42) Petrov Defense, 35 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 1999 
(D27) Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical, 70 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 2000 
(A17) English, 65 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 2001 
(D27) Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical, 39 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik, 2005 
(C42) Petrov Defense, 20 moves, 1-0

Kramnik vs Anand, 2007 
(E06) Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3, 53 moves, 1-0

World Championship 2008 round 3
Kramnik vs Anand, 2008 
(D49) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran, 41 moves, 0-1

World Championship 2008 round 5
Kramnik vs Anand, 2008 
(D49) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran, 35 moves, 0-1

World Championship 2008 round 6
Anand vs Kramnik, 2008 
(E34) Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation, 47 moves, 1-0

World Championship 2008 round 10
Kramnik vs Anand, 2008 
(E21) Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights, 29 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik, 2010 
(C42) Petrov Defense, 45 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik, 2013 
(C65) Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense, 27 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Carlsen
Anand vs Carlsen, 2007 
(C96) Ruy Lopez, Closed, 38 moves, 1-0

Carlsen vs Anand, 2007 
(D47) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 40 moves, 0-1

Carlsen vs Anand, 2008 
(D44) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 59 moves, 0-1

Carlsen vs Anand, 2008 
(B84) Sicilian, Scheveningen, 42 moves, 0-1

Carlsen vs Anand, 2009 
(D45) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 77 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Carlsen, 2010 
(C95) Ruy Lopez, Closed, Breyer, 77 moves, 1-0

Carlsen vs Anand, 2010 
(C65) Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense, 45 moves, 0-1

Carlsen vs Anand, 2012 
(B52) Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack, 30 moves, 1-0

Carlsen vs Anand, 2013 
(E46) Nimzo-Indian, 29 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Carlsen World Championship rd 5
Carlsen vs Anand, 2013 
(D31) Queen's Gambit Declined, 58 moves, 1-0

Carlsen vs Anand World Championship rd 6
Anand vs Carlsen, 2013 
(C65) Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense, 67 moves, 0-1

Carlsen vs Anand World Championship rd 9
Anand vs Carlsen, 2013 
(E25) Nimzo-Indian, Samisch, 28 moves, 0-1

Anand's games in CG.com vs. famous Asian GMs
Anand vs H Ardiansyah, 1986 
(B47) Sicilian, Taimanov (Bastrikov) Variation, 38 moves, 0-1

Anand vs P Thipsay, 1986 
(C78) Ruy Lopez, 48 moves, 1-0

Anand vs N Murshed, 1986 
(B46) Sicilian, Taimanov Variation, 60 moves, 1-0

Anand vs D Barua, 1986 
(C84) Ruy Lopez, Closed, 42 moves, 1-0

D Barua vs Anand, 1986 
(B46) Sicilian, Taimanov Variation, 52 moves, 1-0

E Torre vs Anand, 1986 
(E15) Queen's Indian, 29 moves, 1-0

Anand vs D Barua, 1987
(C55) Two Knights Defense, 42 moves, 1-0

Anand vs P Thipsay, 1987 
(C90) Ruy Lopez, Closed, 59 moves, 1-0

Anand vs P Thipsay, 1987 
(C69) Ruy Lopez, Exchange, Gligoric Variation, 6.d4, 70 moves, 1-0

Anand vs J Ye, 1989 
(B81) Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack, 31 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Ye Rongguang, 1990 
(C79) Ruy Lopez, Steinitz Defense Deferred, 58 moves, 1-0

Anand vs E Torre, 1990 
(C64) Ruy Lopez, Classical, 47 moves, 1-0

Anand vs E Torre, 1990 
(C86) Ruy Lopez, Worrall Attack, 47 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Adianto, 1992 
(B14) Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack, 33 moves, 1-0

Sasikiran vs Anand, 2002 
(A07) King's Indian Attack, 53 moves, 1-0

Zhong Zhang vs Anand, 2004 
(B40) Sicilian, 40 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Wang Yue, 2009 
(D15) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, 33 moves, 1-0

Wang Yue vs Anand, 2010 
(E00) Queen's Pawn Game, 51 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Wang Hao, 2011 
(E25) Nimzo-Indian, Samisch, 33 moves, 1-0

Wang Hao vs Anand, 2013 
(C45) Scotch Game, 49 moves, 1-0

Wang Hao vs Anand, 2013 
(A34) English, Symmetrical, 38 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Ding Liren, 2013 
(B18) Caro-Kann, Classical, 32 moves, 1-0

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