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WCC: Lasker-Janowski 1910
Compiled by WCC Editing Project
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ORIGINAL: Lasker - Janowski World Championship Match (1910)

David Janowski was born in Wołkowysk, Poland (today Vawkavysk, Belarus), but later relocated to France. From the end of the 19th century onward, he was a regular participant in strong international tournaments.<1> Among his successes were a win in the Janowski - Marshall, Match 1 (1899) and a shared 1st with Geza Maroczy at the Barmen Meisterturnier A (1905). He became known for his strong combinational skills.<2> Janowski was described as "extremely ingenious, sometimes shifty, resourceful" and possessing first class education in chess technique.<3> He was also noted for his low percentage of draws.<3>

After London (1899), Janowski challenged world champion Emanuel Lasker to a match for Ł400 a side. Lasker accepted the challenge,<4> but the negotiations broke down when Janowski insisted on 10 games up and Lasker refused more than 8 games up.<5>

In May 1909, financed by his wealthy patron Leo Nardus, Janowski played an <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) against Lasker in Paris, which ended drawn (+2 -2 =0). Enthusiastic about the outcome of the match, Nardus proposed a match for the world championship. While Lasker had no objection in principle, he had to leave France before reaching a final decision.<6> In addition, he had already accepted Carl Schlechter 's challenge in November 1908 to a title match,<7> which was finally played in <early 1910>-<insert match link here>-Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910). Lasker and Janowski played a second <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) <8> in Paris from October to November 1909, which saw Lasker emerge as the clear winner (+7 -1 =2).<9> On November 12, 1909 they signed an agreement for a title match in autumn 1910, provided that Lasker retained his title in his upcoming match against Schlechter.<10>

Lasker defended his crown in the drawn Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910) in January and February, and Janowski got his shot at the title. Janowski was eager to crush the champion,<11> and had prepared for the match for several weeks in Ostend.<12>. He claimed to have studied hundreds of games by Lasker.<11> According to the challenger, Lasker had worse positions in most games and his opponents only lost because they played for a win prematurely. Janowski wanted to demonstrate to the world that "Lasker's game was not chess, but dominoes."<11> During their title match, Lasker characterized Janowski in the following way: "Independently he searches for the beautiful, ingenious, deep and hidden. Sadly, he goes too far therein. He pays not the slightest attention to ordinariness. In fact, this gives his play a special appeal, at the same time it is also his weak spot."<13>

The match for the world championship was held November 8 - December 8 in the Kerkau-Palast in Berlin.<14> Nardus donated a prize of 5,000 francs <14> for the first to score 8 victories, draws not counting.<10> Tournament director Alfred Ehrhardt Post let Janowski draw the lot to decide who would commence the match with the white pieces.<15> The match began at 4 pm with Lasker having the first move.<15> He won a <22 move miniature> Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 when Janowski blundered a piece on the 19th move. Janowski played for an attack in <game 2>, Janowski vs Lasker, 1910 <16> which was adjourned after 33 moves. Playing time was set from 4 pm to 8 pm the next day,<16> and the game ended in a draw.<17> <Game 3> Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 was a marathon game which had to be adjourned four times and Janowski defended tenaciously to salvage half a point after 101 moves.<18,19> The world champion won the next two games, although he had a losing position after 11 moves in <game 5>. Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 <20> Janowski defended stubbornly again in <game 6> Janowski vs Lasker, 1910 to split the point after two adjournments.<21> Lasker won <game 7> Lasker vs Janowski, 1910. In the twice-adjourned <game 8> Janowski vs Lasker, 1910, Janowski reached a favorable position and refused to take a draw by perpetual check, only to end up losing.<22,23> After losing <game 9> Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 following an adjournment, Janowski took a rest day.<24> Lasker also won games 10 and 11 and retained his title after only 11 games (+8 -0 =3).<25>

There was limited attention from the public since most people thought Janowski had little chance of winning, and it was the second title match in a short span of time.<14> Furthermore, the press gave limited coverage, because Lasker had secured the copyright for the games, so they couldn't be printed without charge.<26> A leading contemporaneous chess periodical criticized the quality of the games, claiming that Nardus' sponsorship was the only thing "grandmasterly" about the contest.<14>

1 Rod Edwards, http://www.edochess.ca/players/p487...

2 "Wiener Schachzeitung", July-August 1910, p. 252. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

3 "Wiener Schachzeitung", February 1927, pp. 29-30. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

4 "British Chess Magazine", September 1899, p. 373

5 "British Chess Magazine", December 1899, p. 509

6 "Wiener Schachzeitung", August 1909, pp. 234-236. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

7 "Wiener Schachzeitung", December 1908, p. 376. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

8 Edward Winter, "Lasker v Janowsky, Paris,
1909", http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

9 "Wiener Schachzeitung", December 1909, pp. 410-413. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

10 "La Stratégie", February 1910, pp. 60-61. In Edward Winter, "Lasker v Janowsky, Paris, 1909", http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

11 "Algemeen Handelsblad", 3 June 1910, p. 9. Provided in Delpher, http://kranten.delpher.nl/nl/view/i...

12 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 9 November 1910, p. 9. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

13 Emanuel Lasker, "Ost und West", December 1910, p. 825. In http://www.compactmemory.de/index_p...

14 "Wiener Schachzeitung", January 1911, pp. 32-33. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

15 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 10 November 1910, p. 10. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

16 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 12 November 1910, p. 7. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

17 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 13 November 1910, p. 11. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

18 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 14 November 1910, p. 4. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

19 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 16 November 1910, p. 6. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

20 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 25 November 1910, pp. 8-9. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

21 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 23 November 1910, p. 9. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

22 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 1 December 1910, p. 9. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

23 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 3 December 1910, pp. 8-9. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

24 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 6 December 1910, p. 7. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

25 Emanuel Lasker, "Pester Lloyd", 11 December 1910, p. 13. In ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, http://content.onb.ac.at/cgi-conten...

26 "Bohemia", 27 November 1910, p. 34. Provided in Kramerius (a project of the National Library of the Czech Republic), http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/h...

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Placeholder

In May 1909, financed by his wealthy patron Leo Nardus, Janowski played an <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) against Lasker in Paris, which ended drawn (+2 -2 =0). Enthusiastic about the outcome of the match, Nardus proposed a match for the world championship. While Lasker had no objection in principle, he had to leave France before reaching a final decision.<6> In addition, he had already accepted Carl Schlechter 's challenge in November 1908 to a title match,<7> which was finally played in <early 1910>-<insert match link here>-Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910). Lasker and Janowski played a second <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) <8> in Paris from October to November 1909, which saw Lasker emerge as the clear winner (+7 -1 =2).<9> On November 12, 1909 both masters signed an agreement for a title match in autumn 1910, provided that Lasker retained his title in his upcoming match against Schlechter.<10>

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IMPORTANT SOURCE IMPROVEMENT

The part about Janowski's preparation for the Lasker match based on source <2>, was taken over by the WSZ from the 'Algemeen Handelsblad'.

I found the original:

http://kranten.delpher.nl/nl/view/i...

'Algemeen Handelsblad', 3 June 1910, p. 9

the decisive paragraph is the in the 2nd column, right above the game score of the 2nd game.

If we implement it, this would be the new source <10> (the WSZ article had been used at the beginning for the characterization of Janowski as a strong combinational player so it has to stay and can't be simply replaced), so in this paragraph

"Lasker defended his crown in the drawn Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910)) in January and February, and Janowski got his shot at the title in late 1910. Janowski was eager to take revenge and claimed to have studied hundreds of games by Lasker.<2> He had prepared for the match for several weeks in Ostend.<10> The challenger considered Lasker's play to be weak, but the world champion's opponents lost because they tried to cash in on the victory prematurely. Janowski wanted to demonstrate to the world that "Lasker's game was not chess, but dominoes."<2> During their title match, Lasker characterized Janowski in the following way: "Independently he searches for the beautiful, ingenious, deep and hidden. Sadly, he goes too far therein. He pays not the slightest attention to ordinariness. In fact, this gives his play a special appeal, at the same time it is also his weak spot."<11>"

source <2> would become the new source <10> (i. e. the Algemeen Handelsblad):

"Lasker defended his crown in the drawn Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910) in January and February, and Janowski got his shot at the title in late 1910. Janowski was eager to take revenge and claimed to have studied hundreds of games by Lasker.<10> He had prepared for the match for several weeks in Ostend.<11> The challenger considered Lasker's play to be weak, but the world champion's opponents lost because they tried to cash in on the victory prematurely. Janowski wanted to demonstrate to the world that "Lasker's game was not chess, but dominoes."<10> During their title match, Lasker characterized Janowski in the following way: "Independently he searches for the beautiful, ingenious, deep and hidden. Sadly, he goes too far therein. He pays not the slightest attention to ordinariness. In fact, this gives his play a special appeal, at the same time it is also his weak spot."<12>"

and all the subsequent footnotes would have to be changed accordingly.

#############################################

EDIT <Karpova>- from Page 5 of 'The Brisbane Courier' of July 26, 1899: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/art...

-<CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP.
LONDON, July 25

Herr Lasker has accepted the challenge of M. Janowski to play for the chess championship of the world and Ł400 a side.

In the great international chess tourney which was recently concluded in London Herr Lasker easily won the first prize, and M. Janowski tied with Messrs. Pillsbury and Maroczy for second place. After the conclusion of the tourney M. Janowski challenged Herr Lasker to play for the championship of the world, and the challenge has now been accepted.>

#########################################################

EDIT <JFQ>- From Ken Whyld's article on Lasker-Janowski:

<"After the tournament Lasker fulfilled engagements in the Baltic states, but was taken ill in Riga and cancelled a projected tour of South Africa. After a period of convalescence in Berlin he went to Paris to play a short match against Janowsky who had a wealthy patron Leonardus Nardus, willing to finance it. The idea was that if Janowsky did well enough Nardus would pay for a full title match. Lakser was never unwilling to allow those with excess wealth to contribute to the needs of the chess community. Four good games were played, <<<Lasker>>> winning the first and last, and Janowsky the second and third. There is certainly no evidence from the games that Nardus was being led on, but the cynic may note that in total Lasker won twenty-six games, drew seven and lost four against Janowsky, and two of these losses were in this short match. Nardus was delighted, and soon arranged a well-paid match of ten games. Lasker explained that it could not be a championship match, because he was already committed to one with Schlechter, but Nardus went happily ahead. Janowsky won one game. It was a Pyrrhic victory for Lasker as it turned out, because it killed any interest in the Schlechter match...>

after the Schlecter match

<...Perhaps the result <<<of the Schlechter match>>> led Nardus to think that Lasker was fading-- after all, he had been at the top for almost 20 years. For whatever reason, he once more financed his protege, and, after a tour of North and South America, Lasker returned to Berlin to collect an easily earned wedding present...

(Whyld means the win over Janowski was a wedding present)>

-"Emanuel Lasker" by Ken Whyld
in <World Chess Champions> Edward Winter, ed.
Pergamon Press 1981
pp. 46-47

########################################################

In 1909, Emanuel Lasker played two exhibition matches in Paris against the strong Polish master, David Janowski, drawing the first one (+2 -2 =0) but handily winning the second (+7 -1 =2). These matches were not considered world championship matches. The matches were sponsored by a wealthy painter and chess patron, Léonardus Nardus, who paid Lasker 7,000 francs for the exhibition.

Janowski's relative success in the first exhibition match, combined with his financial backing, was enough impetus for Lasker to put his title on the line.

#####################

EDIT <Karpova>

Original version: <Janowski's relative success in these matches, combined with his financial backing, was enough impetus for Lasker to put his title on the line for the third time in a little over a year. >

INSERTED EDIT <JFQ>

Edited version: <<Janowski's relative success in the first exhibition match, combined with his financial backing, was enough impetus for Lasker to put his title on the line.>

You'll note I also changed "these matches" to "the first exhibition match" because Janowski's score in the second exhibition can in no way be considered part of a "relative success.">>

##############################

EDIT <Karpova>

<The 1909 'Wiener Schachzeitung' reports on pages 235-236 that the sponsor of the three matches, Leonardus Nardus, tried to arrange a WC match between Dr. Lasker and Janowski right after their drawn exhibition match. Dr. Lasker had agreed in principle (<Lasker hat im Prinzip seine Zustimmung gegeben>) but he had to leave Paris for New York before he could arrive at a decision (<bevor der Weltmeister zu einem Entschluß gelangen konnte.>). It should be noted, that the wording is rather ambiguous - Nardus wanted a WC match but that Dr. Lasker agreed in principle could mean that he merely considered a second match and not necessarily that he would be willing to put his title at stake.

Later that year, Nardus finally managed to make them play another match (page 410) but as far as I know there's no contemporary source proving that it was a WC match.

The actual WC match in 1910 received the least public attention (pages 32-33 of the 1911 'Wiener Schachzeitung') and the report on it was everything but nice for the following reasons:

1) Janowski not only hadn't faired too well against Dr. Lasker in the II. exhibition match, he had lost earlier in 1910 a match against Dr. Esser.

2) For sure, the dramatic WC match against Schlechter overshadowed such a one-sided affair.

3) Dr. Lasker had reserved the property law for the game scores so the periodicals could not print and annotate them. That's why that scant 2-pages report from 1911 is the only one on the match, while the exhibition matches got extensive coverage>

##############################

EDIT <Karpova>

<Winter's feature article on why the 1909 matches were not for the WC title reproduces the 1910 WC match agreement from pages 60-61 of the February 1910 'La Strategie' (as it is reiterated there, that no 1909 match was for the title): http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...>

#################################

It would be another 11 years before another world championship match would take place.

The first player to secure 8 victories (draws not counting) would claim the title. On the present occasion Janowski fared even worse than in the exhibitions, as Lasker gained an overwhelming victory by 8 games to 0, with 3 games drawn. Janowski was subject to unfortunate oversights in some of the games, and his erratic play was a great handicap to his chances. Play took place in Berlin. The first game was played on November 8th, the match finishing on December 8th.1

########################################

1 The Yearbook of Chess, edited by Fred Wilson

EDIT <Phony Benoni>

<"The Yearbook of Chess edited by Fred Wilson" is a misnomer. <The Year-book of Chess> was issued by E. A. Michell from 1907-1915. Wilson used selections from the Year-book to compile two books, issued by Dover in 1975 and 1976:

Classical chess matches, 1907-1913

Lesser-known chess masterpieces, 1906-1915.>

##########################

FINISHED DRAFT EDIT <Karpova>

David Janowski was born in Wołkowysk, Poland (today Vawkavysk, Belarus) but later relocated to France. From the end of the 19th century onwards, he was a regular participant in strong international tournaments.1 Among his successes were a win in the Janowski - Marshall, Match 1 (1899) and a shared first place with Geza Maroczy at the Barmen Meisterturnier A (1905). He became known for his strong combinational skills.2 The games of his heyday were described as showing the "lion's claw" and he was well-known for his low percentage of draws.3

Financed by his wealthy patron Leo Nardus, in May 1909 Janowski played an <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) against world champion Emanuel Lasker in Paris, which ended drawn (+2 -2 =0). Enthusiastic about the outcome of the match, Nardus proposed a match for the world championship. While Lasker had no objection in principle, he had to leave France.4 They played a second <exhibition match>-<insert match link here>- Lasker - Janowski (1909) 5 in Paris from October to November, which saw Lasker emerge as the clear winner (+7 -1 =2).6 It's possible that Lasker's contract with Carl Schlechter and his departure for America did not allow for negotiations for a world championship match with Janowski in 1909.

Despite the last setback, Janowski got his shot at the title in late 1910, after Lasker had defended his crown in the drawn Lasker - Schlechter World Championship Match (1910) in January and February. Janowski was eager to take revenge and claimed to have studied hundreds of games by Lasker. He considered the world champion's play to be weak but his opponents lost because they tried to cash in on the victory prematurely. Janowski wanted to demonstrate to the world that "Lasker's game was not chess, but dominoes."2 During their title match, Lasker characterized Janowski in the following way: "Independently he searches for the beautiful, ingenious, deep and hidden. Sadly, he goes too far therein. He pays not the slightest attention to ordinariness. In fact, this gives his play a special appeal, at the same time it is also his weak spot."7

The match for the world championship was held from November 8 to December 8 in the Kerkau-Palast in Berlin. Leo Nardus donated a prize of 5,000 Francs for the winner, declared to be the first to score 8 victories. The match began with Lasker winning a miniature, after Janowski blundered a piece on move 19. After an uneventful draw in game 2, Janowski defended tenaciously and salvaged half a point after 101 moves in game 3. The world champion won the next two games, although he had a losing position after 11 moves in game 5. Janowski defended stubbornly again in game 6 to split the point. But Lasker went on to win five consecutive games with Janowski refusing a 3-fold repetition in game 8. Lasker defended his title after only 11 games (+8 -0 =3).

The match received limited attention from the public as Lasker had secured the copyright for the games, which therefore couldn't be printed without charge. The games were also criticized as being of low quality with Nardus' sponsorship being the only thing "grandmasterly" about the contest.8

1 http://www.edochess.ca/players/p487...

2 Wiener Schachzeitung, July-August 1910, page 252

3 Wiener Schachzeitung, February 1927, page 29

4 Wiener Schachzeitung, August 1909, pages 234-236

5 http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

6 Wiener Schachzeitung, December 1909, pages 410-413

7 Ost und West, December 1910, page 825

8 Wiener Schachzeitung, January 1911, pages 32-33

Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 
(D40) Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch, 22 moves, 1-0

Janowski vs Lasker, 1910 
(D05) Queen's Pawn Game, 45 moves, 1/2-1/2

Lasker vs Janowski, 1910 
(D60) Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, 101 moves, 1/2-1/2

3 games

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