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WCC: Alekhine-Euwe 1935
Compiled by WCC Editing Project
--*--

ORIGINAL: Alekhine - Euwe World Championship Match (1935)

DRAFT EDIT in progress: <JFQ>

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During the Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934) Alekhine accepted a title challenge from Max Euwe.<1 "American Chess Bulletin" April 1934, p.66. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" (McFarland 1989), pp.233-234> Jose Raul Capablanca regarded this agreement to be "unjustifiable," insisting that Alekhine first "play the promised return-match with himself."<2 "British Chess Magazine" April 1935, p.189. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" p.234>

But Alekhine held Capablanca to the $10,000 purse requirement guaranteed by the London rules of 1922.

3 "American Chess Bulletin" May-June 1934, p.75. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" p.234

The champion felt justified to play Euwe for a lower purse because Euwe never signed the London rules.<4> Capablanca, who had blanked Euwe +2 -0 =8 in a Capablanca - Euwe (1931) match, did not regard him to be a "serious competitor" for the title,<2>. According to Hans Kmoch, in January 1934 he and Euwe were discussing his equal record against Alekhine of "7:7 out of their last 14 games," and Euwe decided that evening to challenge Alekhine.<5>

Euwe's record suggests he was a serious competitor for the title. Though he had never beaten Capablanca, he had finished ahead of him at Hastings (1930/31) and Hastings (1934/35). He boasted victories over Mikhail Botvinnik, Efim Bogoljubov, Salomon Flohr, and most importantly Alekhine himself, including their <last encounter>-<insert game link here Euwe vs Alekhine, 1934> at Zurich (1934)>

The match conditions stipulated an initial limit of 30 games to be played in 13 different Dutch cities. The first to 15 1/2 points with 6 wins would triumph, with Alekhine enjoying draw odds.<7> If Euwe led after 30 games without 6 wins, the match would continue until he made 6 wins or Alekhine equaled his score.<4> Alekhine would also receive the entire purse of 10,000 guilders ($6,700) win or lose, and the right to a rematch within one year.<4,8> Hans Kmoch was arbiter and the seconds were Geza Maroczy (Euwe) and Salo Landau (Alekhine). Euwe recalls that "...after the 26th or the 27th game Landau withdrew after a disagreement with Alekhine. In the remaining games (Ernst Ludwig Klein helped Alekhine, but he had no official status." <9>

Alekhine began by surging to a 5-2 lead. Some fans believed Euwe "would crack completely," but he clawed back with a sparkling win in <game 8>-Euwe vs Alekhine, 1935 .<10> Alekhine remained sanguine, later recounting that "from the 10th to the 14th games, I was falsely persuaded into a belief that the match was virtually over."<11> It wasn't. With the champion leading by a point, a mishap caused Alekhine to show up late for game 21. Alekhine became angry that the car sent to pick him up was delayed by traffic, and he began drinking hours before the game. The next day "the press became harsh towards Alekhine, claiming that he had come to the game totally intoxicated... to upset his opponent with unsportive behavior."<12> The "Het Volk" appears to have been the first Dutch newspaper to make these charges.<13> Alekhine, Euwe, Kmoch, and FIDE president Alexander Rueb later denied the charges.<11,12,14>. Alekhine lost the game, handing Euwe a momentum he would never relinquish. Euwe struck twice more to lead by 2 points with only 4 games to play. Alekhine responded magnificently by winning <game 27>- Alekhine vs Euwe, 1935, a performance Emanuel Lasker called "a brilliant achievement... It is the more to be acclaimed, as he was obviously getting through a crisis of the soul."<15> Euwe led by a point heading in to the final game, meaning Alekhine had to win to retain his title. After move 40, the game was agreed drawn. Max Euwe had become the 5th world chess champion.

At the victory celebration, Alekhine announced "I am proud and happy that the world has as a chess champion, a gentleman.” Euwe replied that "from my birth I've been your friend and admirer... I will always be." Alekhine then interrupted Euwe with a spontaneous remark, "Mister World-Champion, you were always my friend, and will always stay my friend." This triggered a thunderous burst of applause, and Euwe, visibly moved, walked over to Alekhine to shake his hand, as the ex-champion finished by murmuring "I have always respected you."<16>

1 "American Chess Bulletin" April 1934, p.66. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" (McFarland 1989), pp.233-234

2 "British Chess Magazine" April 1935, p.189. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" p.234

3 "American Chess Bulletin" May-June 1934, p.75. In Edward Winter, "Capablanca" p.234

4 Leonard Skinner and Robert Verhoeven, "Alexander Alekhine's Chess Games 1902-1946" (MacFarland 1998), pp.534-535

5 Hans Kmoch, "Max Euwe" (Berlin and Leipzig 1938), p.123. In Edward Winter, "Chess Facts and Fables" (McFarland 2006), p. 298

7 "Wiener Schachzeitung" May 1936, pp.133-139

8 "Het Phohi-Sportpraatje. Schaken en Voetbal."
in "Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië" (24 Dec 1935), p.3 In http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

9 "The Times" 18 February 1978, p.13. In Edward Winter, "Ernst Ludwig Klein" http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

10 "Wiener Schachzeitung" October-November 1935, pp.309-310

11 "Chess" 14 Dec. 1935, p.124. In Edward Winter, Chessnote 7937 http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

12 "Wiener Schachzeitung" Jan 1936, pp.17-20

13 "Het Volk" 20 Nov 1935. Cited in "Limburger koerier" 21 Nov 1935, p.7 http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

14 Munninghoff, p.131

15 "Wiener Schachzeitung" January 1936, pp.8-10

16 "Profilti-News" 15 Dec. 1935. French transl. Sarah Brown, Dutch and German transl. Dakgootje.
http://www.geschiedenis24.nl/speler...

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-<On DRAW ODDS> <Alekhine-Euwe 1935>

Kmoch describes with the last sentence beginning on that page and ending on the other. Here my rough translation:(concerning game 30) "If Alekhine wins, the match is drawn, the champion undefeated and everthing remains the same, as it has happened after the match Lasker vs Schlechter."

-pp. 133-134 of the May 1936 'Wiener Schachzeitung' (Hans Kmoch, Amsterdam, 15 December 1935).

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Rematch Clause

<As noted in C.N. 2473, the contract for the 1935 championship match specified that, if defeated, Alekhine would be entitled to a rematch ‘at a time acceptable to Dr Euwe, in view of his profession’. Euwe narrowly won that 1935 contest, and page 393 of the August 1936 BCM reported that when the two players met in Amsterdam on 19 June 1936 ‘the arrangement was then confirmed to begin the return match for the world championship title in October 1937’, in various Dutch cities.>

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

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1

Between April 1 to June 14, 1934 (Alekhine-Bogoljubov match)

<"It seems... that the next match for the title will be between Dr. sic Alekhine and <<<Dr. Max Euwe>>> of Amsterdam, whose challenge was accepted by the former 'in principle,' pending the outcome of the match with Bogoljubow.">

"American Chess Bulletin"
April 1934
p. 66
In Edward Winter,
"Capablanca"
(MacFarland 1989), p.p. 233-234

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2

February-March 1935

<"During the Moscow tournament in February-March 1935 Capablanca gave an interview to the <Moscow Daily News>. 'He considered Dr. sic Alekhine's retention of the title without a match against a serious competitor <<<unjustifiable...>>> Alekhine should, in the first instance, play the promised return-match with himself.">

British Chess Magazine
April 1935
p. 189

In Edward Winter
"Capablanca"
MacFarland, 1989
p.234

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3

May-June 1934

<"Dr. sic Alekhine and Dr Max Euwe... have agreed to play the next match for the title the latter part of next year...

The champion has also announced that he will be prepared, within four months of the conclusion of this engagement, to play a return match with Jose R. Capablanca under the agreement of 1922, stipulating, however, that the amount of the purse must be guaranteed in <<<gold>>> dollars.">

-"American Chess Bulletin
May-June 1934
p. 75

In Edward Winter
"Capablanca"
MacFarland, 1989
p.234)

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4

June 1934

<"As early as June 1934, even before the world championship match between Alekhine and Bogoljubow had finished, Euwe had cabled Alekhine signifying his agreement to play a match for the world championship on Alekhine's terms.... One important point was that Euwe had not been a signatory to the <<<London Convention of 1922,>>> so Alekhine felt quite justified in stipulating financial conditions that were considerably easier than those he was insisting on from Capablanca.">

-Skinner and Verhoeven
"Alexander Alekhine's Chess Games 1902-1946"
MacFarland, 1998
pp. 534-535

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5

Alexander Munninghoff
"Max Euwe, The Biography"
New in Chess, 2001
pp. 101-103

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6

Chessmetrics http://chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/Mont...

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7

On DRAW ODDS <Alekhine-Euwe 1935>

Kmoch describes with the last sentence beginning on that page and ending on the other. Here my rough translation:(concerning game 30)

<"If Alekhine wins, the match is drawn, the champion undefeated and <<<everything>>> remains the same, as it has happened after the match Lasker vs Schlechter.">

<Amsterdam, Bellevue, December 15. Who would have thought at the beginning of the match taht the 30th game would be decisive? Again reiterating: If Alekhine wins, the match is drawn, the WC not beaten

P. 134: and like in Lasker - Schlechter 1910, veverything stays the way it was. The committee rented the biggest hall available, but the capacity of 2,000 people was not enough. a strong platoon of ploicemen on horses had to keep the people seeking entrance at bay. Snow fell, yet the enthusiast stood in the queue for hours. It was Sunday, or else the press would have printed a special for every phase of the game, but this way the resorted to posting the moves with chessplayers explaining them. One newspaper rented a hall for 1,000 people (completely full) wherein an international grandmaster explained the moves, as they didn't want the people to have to wait outside in the cold.

The game began at 7 pm, the committee had delayed the game for half an hour to lower the excitement. Euwe arrived at 6:30 pm and was hailed frenetically by the audience. In the last minute, Alekhine arrived. The WC was very elegantly dressed, though pale but glancing like during his lordliest/proudest days and welcomed with applause. he bowed down and said they meant his opponent (<<<Der Weltmeister trug Festkleidung: Frack, weiße Binde, Lackschuhe - eine blendend elegante Erscheinung. Wohl war sein Antlitz bleich, aber er hielt den Kopf hoch und blickte drein wie in seinen stolzesten Tagen. Die Menge klatschte. Da trat er an die Rampe, verneigte sich tief und sagte lächelnd: "Ich weiß, daß der Beifall meinem Gegner gilt". Es war eine wehmütige Ablehnung.>>>). P. 135: Game 30 (last), December 15, Hotel Bellevue, Amsterdam. White 2 h 10 min, Black 1 h 50 min. P. 136: Euwe offered a draw after 25.Rf2 but Alekhine declined, showing signs of earnest regret. P. 137: After move 34, Euwe repeated his draw offer but Alekhine rejected with tortured mien (<<<gequälter miene>>>) <<<"Ich muß, ich muß weiterspielen!">>> (i must, i must to play on). After Euwe had made his 40th move and prepared to sealhis following move, Alekhine understood that everything was over. <"Werden sie ihren nächten Zug abgeben?"> (are you going to seal your next move?) alekhine asked with low voice, Euwe shrugged <<<Wir haben es doch immer so getan.>>> (we always did it that way). The WC lowered his head for the fraction of a second, composed himself immediately and declared to be willing to accept the draw offer. Euwe gladly did, they stood up and Alekhine was the first one to congratulate him.

Kmoch has a hard time decribing what happened then as exaltation was breaking out. 40 guards stormed the hall. cohorts of filmmakers appeared (<<<Scharen von Filmoperateuren>>>). Euwe got a huge laurel crown around his neck and flowers, flowers, flowers. Mr and Mrs Alekhine got a lot (<<<wurden reichlich bedacht>>>). Alekhine congratulated chess-holland. Euwe managed to esape outside but he was spotted and carried on shoulders to Hotel Carlton, wherein an improvised victory party took place <<<wobei es derart toll zuging, daß sogar Euwe ein Glas Whisky an die Lippen hob>>> (it was so great/mad a party that even Euwe put a glass of whisky at his lips). The celebrations went on for some days. P. 138: Euwe slept at most 3-4 h per night. This is how his vacancies went by (he was granted 3 additional weeks). last great obeisanc on january 19 in Delft, the <<<Unterrichtsminister>>> awarded him the <<<Offizierskreuz des Oranje-Nassau-Ordens>>>. Now the chess company (most attended the official closing banquette) : Lasker & Mieses had left earlier, then followed Maroczy. Tartakower left, Flohr stayed longer and then left for Hastings.

official closing banquette: about 600 people in the hotel carlton. schort note by alekhine: he challenged the WC to a rematch. celebrations ended on january 30. "Alekhine-Euwe committee": van Dam, van Harten, mr. levenbach and liket. euwe surprisingly proved stronger in the field of psychology, which was the main battleground of the match. P. 139: Kmoch thinks that the new WC's strength may be his methodical way of thinking. a "weakness" rests on the fact that he doesn't have that much practice, so he can still improve. He could only beat Alekhine because in the critical time, chess was his only profession.>

-pp. 133-139 of the May 1936 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung' (Hans Kmoch, Amsterdam, 15 December 1935)

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8

<Money: Münninghoff in his Euwe biography (English version, p 174): "...the match had yielded Euwe fame but <<<no money.>>> ... Alekhine had stipulated in advance that he would be given the total available 10,000 Dutch guilders, so Euwe, the winner, got nothing.">

-Munninghoff, p. 174

===

First talks about Euwe being an amateur player: "Even so for the latest worldchampionship match he has received nought; whereas Alekhin -as one knows- has gotten 10000 guilders."

Header: Het Phohi-Sportpraatje. Schaken en Voetbal. Newspaper: Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië Publication date: 24-12-1935
p.3

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

=================

EDIT <thomastonk>:

Money conversion newspaper sources:

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

The Dutch newspapers state that 1 dollar = 1.48 guilders at the beginning of the match. A French Franc was around 9.75, a pound sterling around 7.25.

===

thomas tonk Match conditions newspaper sources:

Header: Om het wereldkampioenschap schaken. De a.s. match tusschen Aljechin en Euwe. Newspaper: Soerabaijasch handelsblad
Date: 16th August 1935
Page: 3
http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

Header: Euwe’s spel ligt Aljechin niet.
Newspaper: Soerabaijasch handelsblad
Date: 17th August 1935
Page: 5
http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

===

EDIT <dakgootje>:

Back to monetary issues. I did find an article drifting lightly along that subject, concerning an interview with Euwe just <after> the match. http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

Dr Euwe furthermore mentioned that if Alekhine wants a rematch, he'll have to gather 10.000 guilders, which according to the ideas of Euwe will have to be yielded* to some fund. And the prizes that one wins? Dr. Euwe mentioned that mainly prizes aren't that big, and secondarily they'll have to be seen as cover for personal expenses.>

So it appears the prize-money wasn't really public knowledge.

Seems to indicate a donation, but you'd expect a deposition.

===

EDIT <dakgootje>:

Sidenote:
There have been some monetary problems. There seems to have been an annulment-clause in the contract, in case at August 28th 1935 not all money had been raised yet.

This happened.

However, the organizing comite trusted in the chesspublic to raise the remaining money (I think to have read 5000 guilders) before the match started.

Bit of financial tightrope-walking that.

Title: ANNULEERINGS-CLAUSULE IN HET CONTRACT GEPASSEERD. De wedstrijd Euwe—Aljechine. In: De Telegraaf evening newspaper
At: Tuesday 28th of August 1935; page 9.

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

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9

Match Officials

Arbiter: <Hans Kmoch>

Seconds: <Géza Maróczy> (for Euwe) <Salo Landau> (for Alekhine)

"The Times" 18 February 1978, p.13 (page 13) Harry Golombek wrote:

‘It looks as though the first world championship match in which there were seconds whose official duty it was to aid their principals in analysis during adjournments was the 1935 Alekhine-Euwe match in the Netherlands. Alekhine’s second was the Dutch master Landau, and Euwe had the Hungarian grandmaster Maróczy as his second.’

"The Times" 18 February 1978, p.13. In Edward Winter, "Ernst Ludwig Klein" http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

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10

Hans Kmoch:

<Game 8, again in Militiezaal (planned was October 19, changed <<<den Zuschauen zuliebe>>> for the spectators but the audience was a bit smaller nonetheless. Euwe's fans were pessimistic, some believed that Euwe would eventually crack completely. Game started at 18:30. Game 8, October 20, Militiezaal, Amsterdam. Adjourned after move 40, White 2 h 22 min, Black 2 h 5 min. Page 311: Amsterdam, October 21, resumption of the adjourned game. Game began at 16 o'clock (on 1st day 40 moves in 2 h 30 min, then 32 moves in 2 h and 16 moves per h for the rest). Euwe won and the Netherlands gain new courage, except for Euwe who hadn't lost his old one. Page 312: The Dutch do not necessarily expect Euwe to win, they hope for exciting games and Euwe to put up strong resistance. They just don't want him to fail completely. Resumption October 21, Militiezaal, Amsterdam. White 4 h 13 min, Black 4 h 5 min.>

-"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung," October-November 1935, pp. 309-310

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11

Alekhine's excuses for his loss at Alekhine-Euwe 1935

<"During one period, from the 10th to the 14th games, I was falsely persuaded into a belief that the match was virtually over. In consequence, I treated the openings of these games with a carelessness unpardonable and committed errors which to anybody with a knowledge of my powers seemed incomprehensible."

"From about this period, I have been the butt of a campaign of calumniation and misrepresentation organized by a part of the Dutch press and several members of the soi-disant 'Euwe-Alekhine' committee. This campaign reached its climax with the 21st game. This game was played absolutely without any unpleasant incident- contrary to press reports. This is officially confirmed by my adversary, Euwe; the director of the match, Kmoch and both our seconds, Maroczy and Landau. Such a <<<campaign>>> can hardly fail to have an unfortunate effect on a player engaged in a strenuous match, in which his title is at stake. In comparison with the atmosphere of this match, the one at Buenos Ayres in which I gained my title, and those against Bogoljubow in which I succeeded in retaining it, were ideal.">

"Chess" vol 1 1935, p.124. In Edward Winter, Chessnote 7937 http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

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12

EDIT <Karpova>- new Ermelo material/analysis

In C.N. 8538, Silman asks for information on Alekhine allegedly having been found drunk in a field during the 1935 match. Winter announces to turn all actual evidence into a feature article. So there is not much yet, but maybe in the future.

Edward Winter "Alekhine and Alcohol"

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

<"In C.N. 8538 Jeremy Silman (Los Angeles, CA, USA) asked about suggestions that Alekhine was found drunk in a field during his 1935 world championship match against Euwe. Noting that the subject of Alekhine and alcohol had been referred to in a number of C.N. items, we invited further documentation, adding: ‘The word documentation is stressed; frequently elsewhere the subject is treated merely as good for a gossip and a giggle.’ We also promised to gather C.N. material in a single feature article, as is now done here.

The feature article A Question of Credibility, written in 1997, commented with regard to Bill Wall:

Among Mr Wall’s other effluence is a pitiful feature on ‘eccentric chessplayers’ (www.txdirect.net/users/wall/chess.htm). A couple of sentences about Alekhine will give the flavour:

‘In a few tournaments he was found in a field drunk. He would urinate on the floor in other events.’

For these dainty tidings no documentary source is given, of course, for the Walls of this world expect us to take on trust their attacks on the chosen prey of the day. It can only be guessed that he has gleefully seized and embroidered upon what Reuben Fine (strong master, undependable writer) said on page 54 of The Psychology of the Chess Player, but that really won’t do. Poach from a dubious source some suspect chitchat about a deceased master and whisk it up from an alleged one-off incident into a categorical denunciation of repeated misconduct. Yes, being a chess journalist is that easy.

Even today, Wall still allows his words about Alekhine to appear on the Internet, although at a different site.

On pages 410-413 of the August 1978 Chess Life & Review Max Euwe was interviewed by Pal Benko. Here is one exchange, regarding the 1935 world championship match:

‘Benko: I have heard many rumors that Alekhine was drinking heavily during the match and was behaving strangely sometimes. Can you comment?

Euwe: I don’t think he was drinking more then than he usually did. Of course he could drink as much as he wanted: at his hotel it was all free. The owner of the Carlton Hotel, where he stayed, was a member of the Euwe Committee, but it was a natural courtesy to the illustrious guest that he should not be asked to pay for his drinks. I think it helps to drink a little, but not in the long run. I regretted not having drunk at all during the second match with Alekhine. Actually, Alekhine’s walk was not steady because he did not see well but did not like to wear glasses. So many people thought he was drunk because of the way he walked.’

(3005)

Harry Golombek on Alekhine:

‘... even when drunk he could see a great deal further over the board than most chessplayers sober. I remember that, at the Warsaw International Team Tournament of 1935, I was showing a game I had won that day to the fellow members of my team. Alekhine came up, recognized the game and complimented me on it in mellow, if somewhat thickly intoxicated, tones and, in a flash, indicated a vital, winning variation we all had missed.’

Source: ‘Recollections of Alekhine’ by Harry Golombek, Chess Review, May 1951, pages 140-141. See too C.N. 1313. Golombek’s article can also be found on pages 191-196 of The Treasury of Chess Lore by Fred Reinfeld (New York, 1951). The relevant game from the 1935 Olympiad was not identified, but one possibility is Golombek v Horowitz. The former’s annotations on pages 480-481 of the October 1935 BCM referred to 24 h4 as a possible improvement suggested by Alekhine; at moves 28 and 33, shorter wins were pointed out by Golombek (without, however, any mention Alekhine).

(7205)

From Chess and Alcohol:

Alexander Alekhine’s heavy drinking is not in doubt, and Pablo Morán’s monograph on him has a chapter entitled ‘Exhibitions Under the Influence’. There are, though, inferior writers (which is certainly not a description of Morán) who enjoy pouncing on and blowing up any great master’s adversities. See, for instance, the examples quoted at the start of our article The Games of Alekhine. A person who writes that a champion played a world title match ‘more or less in a perpetual stupor’ is capable of writing any old thing about anyone.

A contribution from Martin Weissenberg (Savyon, Israel):

‘In his article on Alekhine in the series “Grandmasters I Have Known” Hans Kmoch wrote:

“It was also at Bled 1931 that Alekhine started to indulge openly in unrestrained drinking. One day, when he joined our wives and me at afternoon tea, his behavior was erratic and he had difficulty speaking. When he snuffed out his cigarette in my wife’s cake, Nadasha Alekhine’s wife rose and led him away. Returning alone after a few minutes, she said to my wife, in grammatically broken German, ‘Excuse me, dear, Alekhine – Russian pig. Now sleeping like child.’

At the closing ceremony of that tournament, Kostić, that inveterate enfant terrible, caused some further painful embarrassment by calling from his end of the table to the other end, where the world champion was sitting next to a few high officials, “Herr Alekhine!”. He always called him “Herr.” “What was it that made you so drunk yesterday, cognac or klekovača?” (Klekovača is the Slovene equivalent of gin.) Alekhine mumbled some denial, but Kostić persisted. “Of course you were drunk! How else could I have beaten you seven to one? I’m very good at skittles, that’s true, but seven to one is too much!”

Kmoch also relates:

“One night when I was out dancing with my wife, Alekhine entered the place just as the band was beginning a Viennese waltz. Alekhine never danced, but on this occasion, though for obvious reasons he was unsteady on his feet, he asked my wife to join him in the waltz. The result was that they both had to be helped up from the floor. We left immediately and I took Alekhine home. There was a moment of anxiety when the world champion, in the process of entering the taxi, almost propelled himself out the other side.”

Elsewhere in his article, Kmoch wrote:

“It is incredible how long Alekhine remained on top despite his pernicious addiction to alcohol.”

A large trunk containing “nothing but liquor bottles – a traveling bar” in Alekhine’s hotel room during his 1934 match against Bogoljubow was also mentioned.’"

Latest update: 14 March 2014>

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I've had a look at Kmoch's report on Ermelo again (January 1936 WSZ, p. 18), which is probably the candidate. Where Alekhine was found is left out (the decisive parts are <Es herrschte große Nervosität, denn Alekhine war nicht zu finden.> and <Schließlich wurde Aljechin gefunden. Er stand zweifellos unter dem Einfluß von Alkohol, was bei ihm keine Seltenheit ist.>). The whole scene plays in the lounge and it is only said that Alekhine couldn't be found, and, in the end, that he was found, not where. So it is possible that he was still somewhere in the hotel the whole time.

===

Hans Kmoch: Ermelo, November 19

<P. 17: Kmoch wants to report in all conscience, without drawing conclusions. The small Ermelo prepared the day well (<<<rührige Vorsorge getroffen>>>), among other things sending 3 cars to Amsterdam P. 18: to pick the whole company up. The cars drove in a single file. But their file was divided by a Amsterdam traffic policeman (<<<Verkehrsschutzmann>>>) and one car lost connection to the others. The driver was non-local and didn't know about chess (<<<orts- und schachfremd>>>) and didn't know the specific address. He arrived at the Hotel Carlton to pick up Alekhine with a delay of almost a whole hour. All the others had already gathered here. There was great nervousness as Alekhine was nowhere to be found. His wife was there and explained in excited tone that her husband considered the delay an insult and would not play today. This dispute took place in the public, in the hall of the Hotel. The <<<Reisemarschall>>> of the committee (<<<Reise>>> means journey/voyage, so he was probably the committee member organizing the travel) did not accept that. He explained that they would arrive 2 hours (<reichlich zwei Stunden>) before the start of the game in Ermelo. Apart from that, he only wanted to negotiate with Alekhine personally. Finally they found Alekhine. There was no doubt that he stood under the influence of alcohol which was not uncommon for him (<<<Er stand zweifellos unter dem Einfluß von Alkohol, was bei ihm keine Seltenheit ist.>>>). In earlier years, Alekhine had been observed in such a state. Then, he is will-less and calm. When he is drunk, you can hardly argue with him and today also, he didn't cause any trouble, agreeing to play. They asked him whether he wanted to travel to Ermelo by car or train and he chose train. His second Landau was entrusted to bring him to Ermelo. Furthermore, the committee decided to start the game half an hour later because of the delay in picking them up. The others left, while Alekhine went to sleep. He was supposed to come to Ermelo about <<<fünfviertel>>> hours (unusual expression, taken literally it's 5 times 15 min, so 1 h 15 min) prior to the game but didn't show up. It was told by telephone that he had missed the train and had to wait for the next one. This would suffice to reach the playing hall in time, i. e. at 7 pm. In the meantime, Alekhine had slept well and also in the train he appeared well-rested. Now he claimed that he would only play under moral protest. The committee refused to register this statement and suggested to let a physician decide whether Alekhine was capable of playing or not. Alekhine refused. The game began.

Kmoch says that Alekhine's appearance did not make a good, but also not an unsual impression on him. He played calmly and his behaviour during the game gave no reason for complaint to opponent and officials (committee, <<<Kampfleiter>>>, second).>

Neue Wiener Schachzeitung, Jan 1936, pp. 17-20

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13

Dakgootje Primary sources on ERMELO "Alekhine was Drunk and Disrespectful"

<the <<<primary source>>> seems to have been newspaper Het Volk of the 20th. Given that http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... is of the 20th, and mentions Het Volk published that morning.>

"Het Volk" 20 Nov 1935. In "De Gooi- en Eemlander" 20 Nov 1935, p.10 http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

Which mentions that Alekhine was warned for being in a doubtful state by mr Levenbach of the comite, to which apparently the response came that it was none of his business. And then goes on telling that OTHER newspapers mentioned Alekhine was drunk. Plural sounds promising.

===

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

is even more useful. Header 'Was Alekhine drunk?', and then goes on to quote a newspaper Het Volk The People, which apparently reported that YES he was drunk, and that it is a shame due to the Dutch hospitality yadda yadda.

But I couldn't quickly find this Het Volk newspaper article. Article of the last link was published the 20th, so if the Het Volk article is around, it will be either publish on 19 or 20. Hopefully there are multiple sources though.

===

Well, the positive news is that the primary source seems to have been newspaper Het Volk of the 20th. Given that http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... is of the 20th, and mentions Het Volk published that morning.

The Major negative news is that the archives at the Royal Library for Het Volk stops February 1934. Not completely clear whether other archives do contain those editions - but if so it seems very likely only in hardcopy-form.

Other newspapers consistently write that Het Volk wrote Alekhine was drunk - taking no responsibility for themselves. Rather on the contrary, one newspaper http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... literally goes on saying they would've have written anything about this sad turn of events if another newspaper only identified by morning paper from Amsterdam hadn't reported about it, driven by the opportunity of sensation. Related to that, this article http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... s very explicit in being very implicit. The first paragraph translates roughly 'During the 21st game of Euwe - Alekhine yesterday, an incident has happened - to which we referred to with half a word, with the thought that this is enough for a careful reader'. The rest of the article deals with a reaction of Levenbach whether there are rules for this (no, though there are sickdays, which is not valid here); and whether Euwe's win was due to these conditions (no). However, during the full article, no further clarification concerning the condition is given.

Interesting chances next day 21 however.
The match is halted due to Alekhine's health reasons. The following article is published: http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... It includes further rough commentary, presumbly from Levenbach: It has been known widely that the World Champion takes strong alcoholic drinks. This is no cause of problems for him, but rather helps him - and causes him to be at his most dangerous for his opponents. It's logical he needs to be at his most dangerous versus Euwe. This was known before. For many this information might seem strange, but they are well-established facts. It then continues noting that the Russian and Dutch mentality are significantly different; and that masters such as Flohr could not yet find any mistake in play by Alekhine - calling the 21ste game potentially one of the best.

===

The plot thickens!

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... starts with 'as we mentioned yesterday that Alekhine was under influence of strong alcoholic beverages'. Goes on telling about how Alekhine is stronger that way, previously beat Bogoljubow 16th apparently in Bayreuth that way; and (!) includes a decleration by comite-member G van Dam, who had spoken Euwe. He said, according to Euwe there were 4 reasons for the drinking: 1 playing stronger, 2 hoping Euwe will underestimate him, 3 hopes to influence public opinion against Euwe 4 due to this third reason, the interest by Euwe for the title is starting to dwindle. Unclear whether the last reason was the feeling of Euwe, or a thought Euwe had as reason for Alekhines drunkness.

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... reiterates many of the same points. Yes, Alekhine was presumably drunk, but he plays better, has multiple reasons etcetera. Main differences with previous article: it starts at length with the place of the press in society (no, really, it does). Apparently the comity called a meeting with the press, moreorless telling them they shouldn't have reported about it. Second difference: they say they didn't actually have a reporter over at Ermelo. However several reliable persons confirmed that Alekhine was drunk. Third, it ends with a German letter by a German physician written to Euwe - thay they both know Alekhine needs alcohol to play at his top, and noting the chess community should thank Euwe twice for not only being the most able but also the morally better person.

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... again much of the same - though in this case Alekhine was dead drunk /utterly drunk. It actually quotes a paragraph of the original Het Volk-article. Which, as per usual now, notes that Alekhine plays better when drunk, but public opinion won't take note of this. The actual article reiterates these points by itself as well.

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... Besides same-old-same-old this mentions that no incident has actually occured the 21st game or earlier in public life. Think I've read this before - seems that aside of drunkly playing brilliantly nothing really happened.

-> There are several more articles. However they all mention 1) Alekhine was drunk; 2) he plays best that way. If not all, then they almost all mention 3) this is mainly a shame because it might decrease the worth of the title in the eyes the general public

I think that's all there is to it.

===

<>Think it may be better to use http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... as a source. This is the only newspaper I could find that has a direct quote from Het Volk rather than a paraphrase.

<>I find it very hard to join articles and opinions found in the press' articles, with the views expressed later about the press.

Almost all articles were apologetic in tone (rather than harsh); many initially avoiding writing about the subject. Even the quote from Het Volk shows they wrote 'beschonken' (viz. inebriated). Later articles (when the match was paused) tended to use drunk more often.

I think I've read 2 articles which may be classified as more harsh, which indeed used terms like 'dead drunk'. However that's on a sample of.. 25-30 articles I looked over concerning the situation.

<>Suppose claims that the drinking may be to upset Euwe are trueish.

True because many papers indeed report such sentiments.

The problem is that it's hearsay. Initial reports say Euwe expressed those sentiments to comite-member Van Dam, who shared them with the press. Problem is of course that we can't be sure whether Euwe actually said and meant it - and even if so presumably wouldn't have wanted it to leak to the press.

<>Was the intoxication denied, or the presumed unsportive intentions?

The former would be rather odd.

===

thomastonk NEW INFORMATION:

When I begun yesterday, I observed that the evening issues of the provincial newspapers had the 'story', and some of them refered to "Het volk", which is unavailable. I also observed what happened in the evening issues of the other major newspapers, but then I went to their morning issues ("ochtend"), in hope for an unbiased view. There is almost nothing but http://kranten.kb.nl/view/paper/id/... has a short paragraph that is maybe worth a look. This paragraph begins with "Dr. Aljechin maakte ..."

My rough translation: 'Alekhine seemed not only to be tired, but also mentally absent. This was for Euwe to such a discomfort that he declared at the 15th move to be unwilling to continue the game under these circumstances. Some efforts were needed to convince him to proceed the game.'

This came as a surprise to me, because I knew Münninghoff's description, who wrote that nothing special happened after the game had begun, except "that Euwe left the hall after his 15th move to catch his breath and compose himself in the fresh forest air". (Some newspapers reported this, too, though they named the 14th move.)

############################################

14

Max Euwe:

"The story that he was drunk is utter nonsense..."

Munninghoff, p.131

########################################

15

<Dr. Lasker annotates (he got help from the Russian master Grigoriew) the 27th match game exclusively for the 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung' on pages 8-10 (January 1936 issue). This is just chess analysis, but his final comment on page 10: <<<Diese Partie ist eine glänzende Leistung Aljechins. Sie ist umso mehr anzuerkennen, als er offenbar eine seelische Krise durchzustehen hatte.>>> (this game is abrilliant achievement by Alekhine. It is the more to be acclaimed, as he was obviously getting through a mental/psychological crisis.)>

"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung" January 1936, pp. 8-10

###############

16

DUTCH NEWSREEL 15 Dec. 1935

ALJECHIN'S SPEECH IN FRENCH:

<“So, I am proud and happy that the world has as a chess champion, a gentleman. I am proud and happy that this gentleman is so ornamented. I take his occasion to revoke my competition officially. <<<I am happy,>>> without being hypocritical, that if it's not me who is champion, then it is Euwe who is champion.”>

--Translation by Sarah Brown

EUWE'S SPEECH IN DUTCH,ALEKHINE IN GERMAN

<3:52 – Euwe: Mister Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, I am already World Champion for 2 days. And I have already had my ups and downs. To tell you the truth, there have been moments when I thought by myself: Such a fuss for only a single point of difference. However, currently I am in another mood. I am as enthusiastic as you are, though I do find it a pity I can’t take part when ‘Long shall he live’ will be sung. 4:30 – Euwe: I am very grateful at mister Aljechin for his words. I think it’s pleasant he did not say that he hoped he would die as Chess-champion as, considering my own prognosis and those of others, I would not live for much longer in that case. I would now like to address Dr. Aljechin. 4:58 – Euwe German: Dear mister docter, You know that so-to-say, from my birth <<<I am your friend and admirer>>>. Applause will always be. I very much hope that we, as we said, in two years, within two years, will have played our duel. It is always for me a very big pleasure to play with You. 5:29 – Aljechin German: Mister World-Champion, you were always my friend, and will always stay my friend. applause, handshaking – can’t make out Aljechins exact next remark, something along the lines that he has always respected Euwe>

--Translation by dakgootje

Carlton Hotel victory celebration
"Profilti-News" Newsreel
15 Dec. 1935
French transl. Sarah Brown
Dutch and German transl. Dakgootje
http://www.geschiedenis24.nl/speler...

######################

NEW EDIT INFORMATION from <Karpova>;

Fine's observations from p. 200 of the November 1941 'Chess Review', e. g. <Nothing could be further from the truth. Alekhine’s chess in the first match was no worse than the quality of chess he had been producing in the four or five years preceding the 1935 debacle, while Euwe’s play in the return encounter was considerably below his best form.>

-Edward Winter C.N. 8326 http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

#############################

3 Oct. - 15 Dec. 1935

Amsterdam (1-3; 8-9; 12-13; 18; 20; 23; 25; 28-30)

The Hague (4; 11; 22; 27)

Delft (5; 24)

Rotterdam (6)

Utrecht (7)

Gouda (10)

Groningen (14)

Baarn (15)

s'Hertogenbosch (16)

Eindhoven (17)

Zeist (19)

Ermelo (21)

Zandvoort (26).

#############################

BEFORE THE MATCH

Euwe the Challenger

================

Budapest (1921 5-19 Sept. 1921

(5th behind Alekhine)

Budapest (1921)

Euwe vs Bogoljubov, 1921 <1-0>

===

Alekhine-Euwe Training Match (1926) 22 Dec. - 8 Jan. 1927

(Lost the match +2 -3 = 5)

Alekhine - Euwe Training Match (1926)

Round 7

Alekhine vs Euwe, 1927 <0-1>

Round 8

Euwe vs Alekhine, 1927 <1-0>

Alekhine: <"After a stay of four months in South America, I returned home in December 1926, and had to face <<<Dr. Euwe>>> in Holland straight afterwards, a week later. This arrangement had already been agreed upon a year beforehand, and was for ten training games. I played for the first time under the new time control of 40 moves in 2 and a half hours ... unfamiliar, and because of this I ended up suffering very badly from time-trouble.

"The result (+3-2=5 in my favour) gave a reasonable indication of both sides' achievements. Dr. Euwe played much more soundly, but on the other hand I was tactically superior to him. I committed, however, a large number of mistakes in time trouble. Thus, for instance, in the 1st, 7th and 9th games I had clearly winning positions, but I gained only a single point (!) from these three games.">

A. Aljechin, "Auf dem Weg zur Weltmeisterschaft, 1923-1927", de Gruyter, 4th edition, 1978, p. 132

===

Bogoljubov - Euwe: First FIDE Championship (1928) 4 April - 5 May 1926

(Lost the match +2 -3 =5)

Bogoljubov - Euwe: First FIDE Championship (1928)

===================

The Hague 1928 World Amateur Championship July-Aug 1928

(1st over Dawid Przepiórka, Karel Treybal, Hermanis Matisons)

===

Bogoljubov - Euwe: Second FIDE Championship (1928) 23 Dec. 1928 to 6 Jan. 1929

(Lost the match +1 -2 =7)

Bogoljubov - Euwe: Second FIDE Championship (1928)

===

Hastings (1930/31) 29 Dec. 1930 - 7 Jan. 1931

(1st over José Raúl Capablanca and Mir Sultan Khan)

Hastings (1930/31)

Sultan Khan vs Euwe, 1931 <0-1>

===

Capablanca - Euwe (1931) 1-10 July 1931

(Lost the match -0 +2 =8)

Capablanca - Euwe (1931)

===

Euwe-Flohr Match 1932 June-Aug 1932

(Drew the match +3 -3 =13)

Euwe vs Flohr, 1932 <1-0>

Euwe vs Flohr, 1932 <1-0>

=================

Berne 1932 16-30 July 1932

(Shared 2d with Flohr behind Alekhine, over Mir Sultan Khan, Ossip Bernstein, Efim Bogoljubov)

Berne (1932)

Euwe vs Bogoljubov, 1932 <1-0>

Alekhine vs Euwe, 1932 <Drawn in 70 moves>

===

Zurich 1934 July 14 - 28th, 1934.

(Shared 2d with Flohr behind Alekhine, over Bogoljubov, Emanuel Lasker and Aaron Nimzowitsch)

Zurich (1934)

Euwe vs Alekhine, 1934 <1-0>

Alekhine's only loss in the tournament

===

Leningrad 1934 17 Aug. - 1 Sept. 1934

(6th, behind Botvinnik, Riumin, Romanovsky, Rabinovich and Kan)

Leningrad (1934)

Botvinnik vs Euwe, 1934 <1/2>

===

Hastings 1934/35 27 Dec. 1934 - 5 Jan. 1935

(Shared 1st with Thomas and Flohr, over Capablanca, Botvinnik and Lilienthal)

Hastings (1934/35)

Botvinnik vs Euwe, 1934 <0-1>

===

####################

Negotiations

Summer 1933

"Euwe... stayed at home during the summer of 1933... Invitations for all kinds of tournaments and simultaneous displays kept arriving... but all were... refused. Inexplicably, one of these letters does not get an immediate reply. It is an invitation from... Alekhine: he wants to play a match against Euwe, similar to their 1927 encounter- but this time on a big passenger ship to the Dutch Indies and back... Five games on the way there, five during the return voyage. The stake: the world championship if need be... Euwe puts the offer from the World Champion aside for the moment and then forgets about it... One evening in 1934... Euwe suddenly remembered Alekhine's letter of some months earlier...

Summer 1934:

<Euwe himself says of this occasion: <<<'(...) at that point the decision had in fact been made: I would challenge Alekhine to a match for the world championship! This decision didn't happen by chance, it was preordained>>>.'>

Alexander Munninghoff
"Max Euwe, The Biography"
New in Chess, 2001
p. 101-103

==================

Between April 1 to June 14, 1934 (Alekhine-Bogoljubov match)

<"It seems... that the next match for the title will be between Dr. sic Alekhine and <<<Dr. Max Euwe>>> of Amsterdam, whose challenge was accepted by the former 'in principle,' pending the outcome of the match with Bogoljubow.">

"American Chess Bulletin"
April 1934
p. 66
In Edward Winter,
"Capablanca"
(MacFarland 1989), p.p. 233-234

==============

May-June 1934

<"Dr. sic Alekhine and Dr Max Euwe... have agreed to play the next match for the title the latter part of next year...

The champion has also announced that he will be prepared, within four months of the conclusion of this engagement, to play a return match with Jose R. Capablanca under the agreement of 1922, stipulating, however, that the amount of the purse must be guaranteed in <<<gold>>> dollars.">

-"American Chess Bulletin
May-June 1934
p. 75

In Edward Winter
"Capablanca"
MacFarland, 1989
p.234)

==============

June 1934

<"As early as June 1934, even before the world championship match between Alekhine and Bogoljubow had finished, Euwe had cabled Alekhine signifying his agreement to play a match for the world championship on Alekhine's terms.... One important point was that Euwe had not been a signatory to the <<<London Convention of 1922,>>> so Alekhine felt quite justified in stipulating financial conditions that were considerably easier than those he was insisting on from Capablanca.">

-Skinner and Verhoeven
"Alexander Alekhine's Chess Games 1902-1946"
MacFarland, 1998
p. 534

==================

July 27-29, 1934

<FIDE officially recognized Dr. Euwe as Alekhine's challenger at the 11th <<<FIDE>>> Congress (1934.07.27-29), this was item Nr. 7. Match to be played in autumn 1935.>

-"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung" 1934, p.305

================

<Dr. Hannak comments on the result of Zürich 1934: <<<Es kann keinem Zweifel unterliegen, daß Euwe heute der reellste Kandidat für den nächsten Weltmeisterschaftskampf gegen Aljechin ist.>>> (It cannot be subject to doubt that today Euwe is the most realistic candidate for the next WC fight against Alekhine)>

-"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung" 1934, p.210

===

Hans Kmoch reports the financial difficulties the organizers of the WC match faced. The funding was secure, but the <<<Zahlmeister>>> (paymaster) complained about the money coming from non-chessplayers mainly, pleading for more financial support from the chessplayers. Furthermore, the WC match was also the reason for the lack of prestigious tournaments in the Netherlands in 1934 (<<<konnten hier im letzten Jahr keine internationalen Treffen von Belang veranstaltet werden>>> couldn't host international meetings of importance/matter/interest in the last year).>

-"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung" 1935, p.281
(on page 280, it says Amstardam, August 1935)

==================

Edward Winter "World Championship Disorder" (2002) http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

<(Alekhine) was involved with <<<FIDE,>>> attending their congresses for example, at the end of the 20ties at least.>

<In the meantime, <<<FIDE>>> was still trying to introduce rules on the selection of the challenger, applicable to subsequent matches. Its congress in Warsaw on 28-31 August 1935 had passed the following resolution:>

<‘Each year the above-mentioned Committee comprising Oskam, Alekhine, Louma, Przepiórka and Vidmar shall draw up a list of masters who have the <<<right to challenge>>> the world champion. Those who in the past six years have three times won or divided the first prize in international tournaments with a minimum of 14 competitors, of which at least 70% are international masters, shall automatically be included on this list.’>

<'CHESS', 14 October 1937 (pages 45-46) quoted from 'Šachový Týden' Alekhine’s reaction to the Stockholm congress: ... <<<I shall not hold myself bound by the decisions of the FIDE>>> and I am under no obligations towards it. I shall act, should I beat Euwe, according to my own judgment, reckoning with the FIDE as a moral factor only insofar as I find their decisions correct and of benefit to chess at large. ...>

=================

Beginning of August 1934

<"The September <British Chess Magazine> (pages 383-384) noted that in New York at the beginning of August Capablanca described 'Dr. sic Alekhine's latest statement, that the fund of $10,000 for a return match must be guaranteed in gold, as <<<'another deliberate stumbling-block'>>> in the way of a match, not justified by the London agreement of 1922.">

Just to clarify- this is the only part of the quote that is direct speech from Capa: <<<'another deliberate stumbling-block'>>>

"British Chess Magazine" Sept. 1934, pp. 383-384. In Edward Winter
"Capablanca"
MacFarland, 1989
p.234

============

February-March 1935

<"During the Moscow tournament in February-March 1935 Capablanca gave an interview to the <Moscow Daily News>. 'He considered Dr. sic Alekhine's retention of the title without a match against a serious competitor <<<unjustifiable...>>> Alekhine should, in the first instance, play the promised return-match with himself.">

British Chess Magazine
April 1935
p. 189

In Edward Winter
"Capablanca"
MacFarland, 1989
p.234

===

May 1935

Contract is signed.

<Alekhine visited the Netherlands at the end of March 1935 for final negotiations. The basic rules are printed here: http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... Two months later, he visited the Netherlands again and signed the<<< contract.>>>

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...>

########################

THE MATCH 3 Oct. - 15 Dec. 1935

Venues

Amsterdam (1-3; 8-9; 12-13; 18; 20; 23; 25; 28-30), The Hague (4; 11; 22; 27), Delft (5; 24), Rotterdam (6), Utrecht (7), Gouda (10), Groningen (14), Baarn (15), s'Hertogenbosch (16), Eindhoven (17), Zeist (19), Ermelo (21), Zandvoort (26).

Match Conditions

EDIT <thomastonk> MATCH CONDITIONS:

<The 30 games/6wins rule is also <<<explained>>> in WSZ 1935, p 284. http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...>

=============

<Money: Münninghoff in his Euwe biography (English version, p 174): "...the match had yielded Euwe fame but <<<no money.>>> ... Alekhine had stipulated in advance that he would be given the total available 10,000 Dutch guilders, so Euwe, the winner, got nothing.">

-Munninghoff, p. 174

===================

<Alekhine visited the Netherlands at the end of March 1935 for final negotiations. The <<<basic rules>>> are printed here: http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i... Two months later, he visited the Netherlands again and signed the contract.

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...>

<The following two articles give detailed information on the work of the <<<"Euwe-Aljechin-Comité",>>> which prepared the match over the period of one and a half year. The single most useful information are the costs of the whole match: 19,000 guilders

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...

http://kranten.kb.nl/view/article/i...>

=================

DRAW ODDS

<"...according to the <<<rules,>>> a 15-15 score would... suffice for the World Champion to retain his title.">

Munninghoff, p. 137

==============

EDIT <thomastonk> and <Karpova>

On DRAW ODDS <Alekhine-Euwe 1935>

Kmoch describes with the last sentence beginning on that page and ending on the other. Here my rough translation:(concerning game 30)

<"If Alekhine wins, the match is drawn, the champion undefeated and <<<everything>>> remains the same, as it has happened after the match Lasker vs Schlechter.">

-pp. 133-134 of the May 1936 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung' (Hans Kmoch, Amsterdam, 15 December 1935).

==============

On page 284 of the September 1935 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung', there is a short note in the news section:

<The <<<conditions were the same as in the last two WC matches.>>> At least 30 games, winner is the one with more points, if he won at least 6 games or else the match goes on until he reached 6 wins>

-"Neue Wiener Schachzeitung" September 1935, p.284

===

Match Officials

Arbiter: <Hans Kmoch>

Seconds: <Géza Maróczy> (for Euwe) <Salo Landau> (for Alekhine)

"CHESS" 14 Dec. 1935, p.124.
In Edward Winter, Chessnote 7937 http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

################

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS during the Match

<Chessnote 8301. Alekhine and cats (C.N.s 4794 & 5575)

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

<José Fernando Blanco (Madrid) enquires about reports that Alekhine had feline company at the board during his 1935 world championship match against Euwe.

The most direct evidence that we can quote is Euwe’s comment in an interview with Pal Benko on page 411 of the August 1978 Chess Life & Review:>

<‘Alekhine was very superstitious. He had a Siamese cat, and sometimes before a game he would put the cat on the chessboard to smell it. He could not play with the <<<cat in his lap,>>> so he wore a sweater with the cat’s picture on it. These things did not disturb me in the first match in 1935. Either Alekhine was not normal or the rest of us are not normal. Anyway, the fact that such a great player as Alekhine needed little tricks like that gave me encouragement.’>>

================

December 1935

Edward Winter, Chessnote 4577. Capablanca’s views on his rivals

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...>

<At a dinner organized by the Spanish Chess Federation at the Casino de Madrid in December 1935 Capablanca was questioned about his rivals. The Alekhine v Euwe world championship match was then being played in the Netherlands, and the Cuban was guarded on that subject. As for the future, he believed that he himself had the greatest right to challenge for the world title, followed by Flohr (who had enjoyed much success in recent years) and Lasker (regarded by Capablanca as still in the first rank of champions, despite his age). The <<<Cuban>>> had very high praise for Botvinnik, whom he considered more likely to become world champion than such other young players as Lilienthal and Reshevsky. Finally, Capablanca spoke highly of Tartakower, saying that he was, when on form, one of the most redoubtable masters.>

The report, published on pages 491-492 of the December 1935 issue of El Ajedrez Español

Euwe vs Alekhine, 1935 
(D21) Queen's Gambit Accepted, 40 moves, 1/2-1/2

1 game

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