chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
 
Jaredfchess
Chess Game Collections
[what is this?] --*-- [what is this?]

<< previous | page 1 of 4 | next >>

  1. "Chess-Games" >Problem of The Day< (2014)
    All the problems for 2014 ... if I can manage it. [I like the games in a certain format. I also do not care if a game gets repeated.]

    A star (asterisk) next to a game is there for one of many reasons:

    <#1.)> This game may be found in another one of my game collections.

    <#2.)> It is a really nice game ... a cool combination or an artistic mate.

    <#3.)> The game may be of historical importance.

    <#4.)> Two stars would mean a game of possible theoretical importance.

    <#5.)> Three stars (or asterisks) indicate that I have a web page on this particular game. (Or that I annotated the game right there on the web page, look in the comments/kibitzing section.)

    ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** *****

    <Of course, my collection is an extremely poor relative.>

    The rich mother of all game collections would have to be:

    Game Collection: Puzzle of the Day 2014.

    92 games, 1864-2014

  2. 50_Bishop pair -how to get it in the opening
    An INTRO referring to a chapter of John Watson' <Secrets of modern chess strategy> should be possible on a trial basis... (see there part II, chapter 4-7)

    < White active: ♗b5xc6 or ♗g5xf6; passive ♘x ♗g3/♗f4/♗e3/♗d2 or x ♗b3/♗c4/♗d3/♗e2

    <<< Black active: ♗b4xc3 or ♗g4xf3; passive ♘x ♗g6/♗f5/♗e6/♗d7 or x ♗b6/♗c5/♗d6/♗e7

    <<>>>>>

    < ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ <>>

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3>


    click for larger view

    C18/C19: French, Winawer/Winawer Advance Opening Explorer (3,209 games)

    < ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ >

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6>


    click for larger view

    C69: Ruy Lopez, Exchange Opening Explorer (3.208 games) with 5. O-O f6 6. d4 Bg4 7. dxe5 Qxd1 8. Rxd1 fxe5 --> Game Collection: 50_Queenless middlegames

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Qxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E32: Nimzo-Indian, Classical Opening Explorer (2,757 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Nd5>


    click for larger view

    B33: Sicilian -Sveshnikov Opening Explorer (2096 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Nd5 Be7 10. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B33: Sicilian -Sveshnikov Opening Explorer (1954 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 c6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


    click for larger view

    D43: Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Opening Explorer (1232 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O Nc6 8. a3 Bxc3 9. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E58: Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line with 8...Bxc3 Opening Explorer (934 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6>


    click for larger view

    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (859 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. a3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3>


    click for larger view

    E24-E29: Nimzo-Indian, Saemisch Opening Explorer (819 games) [<1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 >]

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nc3 Bg4 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3>


    click for larger view

    B11: Caro-Kann, 2♘s variation, 3...Bg4 Opening Explorer (807 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 b6 5. a3 Bxd2+ >


    click for larger view

    E11: Bogo-Indian Defense Opening Explorer (552 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Be7 6. Bxf6 gxf6>


    click for larger view

    Classical C11: Classical French, Rubinstein Opening Explorer (551 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Nf3 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7. Nxg5 >


    click for larger view

    D91: Grunfeld, 5.Bg5 Opening Explorer (537 games) with <7...e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 Bf6 11. h4> as mainline (107 games left)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


    click for larger view

    D38: Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation Opening Explorer (481 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 b5 10. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B67: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7 Opening Explorer (451 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O 5.a3 Bxc3 6.Qxc3>


    click for larger view

    A17: English Opening Explorer (418 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d5 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (380 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nh4 Bg6 7. Nxg6 hxg6 >


    click for larger view

    D12: Queen's Gambit Declined Slav Opening Explorer (371 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 c5 5. Bd3 Nc6 6. Nf3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 d6 >


    click for larger view

    E41: Nimzo-Indian, Huebner variation Opening Explorer (348 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (319 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B30: Sicilian Opening Explorer (285 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (274 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 g6 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (222 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6>


    click for larger view

    C65: Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense Opening Explorer (216 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6 3. Nf3 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 >


    click for larger view

    A46: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (215 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. cxd5 Qxd5 4. e3 e5 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. Bd2 Bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (211 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (209 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. g3 Nf6 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Bg5 d4 11. Bxf6 Qxf6>


    click for larger view

    D34: Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch Opening Explorer (206 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Bg5 h6 5. Bh4 c5 6. d5 d6 7. e3 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E30/E31: Nimzo-Indian, Leningrad /Main Line Opening Explorer (203 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bg5 Bb7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E12/E13: Queen's Indian, 4.Nc3, Main line / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (202 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


    click for larger view

    C13: French Opening Explorer (202 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bg5 Bb7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 g5 8. Bg3 Ne4 9. Qc2 Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E12/E13: Queen's Indian, 4.Nc3, Main line / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (173 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 O-O 5. a3 Bxd2+ >


    click for larger view

    E11: Bogo-Indian Defense Opening Explorer (169 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bd3 Nc6 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3>


    click for larger view

    C01: French, Exchange (Winawer) Opening Explorer (139 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. c4 Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (139 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 Be7 10. Nf3 b5 11. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B69: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 11.Bxf6 Opening Explorer (138 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 >


    click for larger view

    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (134 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 g6 2. c4 Bg7 3. Nc3 c5 4. d5 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 f5 >>


    click for larger view

    A40: Queen's Pawn Game aka <The <Dzindzi Indian> Opening Explorer (117 games) see also my Game Collection: 98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 e6 3.c4 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.e3 b6 8.Qb3 Bb7 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.cxd5 exd5>


    click for larger view

    D58: Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) System Opening Explorer (117 games)

    else <1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 b6 8. Bd3 Bb7 9. Bxf6 Bxf6 10. cxd5 exd5 >


    click for larger view

    Opening Explorer (88 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. g3 Bb4 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. O-O e4 7. Ng5 Bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    A29: English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto Opening Explorer (107 games +)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (105 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Qb6 8. Qd2 Qxb2 9. Rb1 Qa3 10. f5 Nc6 11. fxe6 fxe6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. e5 dxe5 14. Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B97: Sicilian, Najdorf Opening Explorer (99 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Ne5 Nc6 8. Bxc6 bxc6 9. Nxc6 >


    click for larger view

    E06: Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3 Opening Explorer (98 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. g3 Bb4 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. O-O Bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    A29: English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto Opening Explorer (90 games +)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nc3 c5 5. g3 cxd4 6. Nxd4 Ne4 7. Qd3 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E20: Nimzo-Indian / E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights Opening Explorer (95 games)

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Qb6 8. Qd2 Qxb2 9. Nb3 Qa3 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. Be2 >


    click for larger view

    B97: Sicilian, Najdorf Opening Explorer (90 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. e3 O-O 8. Rc1 dxc4 9. Bxc4 c5 >


    click for larger view

    D38: Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation Opening Explorer (87 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nc6 4. O-O Bd7 5. Re1 a6 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B30: Sicilian / B51: Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack Opening Explorer (84 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 h6 10. Bxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B67: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7 Opening Explorer (79 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    E40: Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 Opening Explorer (78 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


    click for larger view

    D80: Grunfeld Opening Explorer (77 games) with <6. cxd5 c6 7. Rc1 O-O 8. dxc6> as mainline (22 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 h6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 >


    click for larger view

    B63: Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack Opening Explorer (70 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B08: Pirc, Classical Opening Explorer (69 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    < 1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 e6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nf6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. e5 Nd5 8. Ne4 f5 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. Nd6+ Bxd6 11. Qxd6>


    click for larger view

    B40: Sicilian / B45: Sicilian, Taimanov Opening Explorer (53 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. Bc4 Nc6 6. d3 Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3>


    click for larger view

    C30: King's Gambit Declined Opening Explorer (46 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Be2 Nh6 7. Bxh6 gxh6 >


    click for larger view

    C02: French, Advance Opening Explorer (45 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. Qg4 Ne7 7. dxc5 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 >


    click for larger view

    C17/C18: French, Winawer Opening Explorer (42 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 Nf6 2. Bb2 g6 3. Bxf6 exf6>


    click for larger view

    A01: Nimzovich-Larsen Attack Opening Explorer (41 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. a3 Nh6 7. b4 cxd4 8. Bxh6 gxh6 9. cxd4 >


    click for larger view

    C02: French, Advance Opening Explorer (41 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Be7 7. c4 Nb6 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Be3 d5 10. c5 Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B05: Alekhine's Defense, Modern Opening Explorer (37 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. b4 cxd4 7. Nb5 Bc7 8. f4 Bd7 9. Nxc7+ Qxc7 >


    click for larger view

    C17/C18: French, Winawer Opening Explorer (35 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B05: Alekhine's Defense, Modern Opening Explorer (35 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. Bxf6 exf6 >


    click for larger view

    A45: Queen's Pawn Game Opening Explorer (32 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B01: Scandinavian Opening Explorer (31 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O Bg4 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Qd2 e5 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Rad1 Qc8 11. Qc1 Rd8 12. Rxd8+ Qxd8 13. Rd1 Qf8 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B08: Pirc, Classical Opening Explorer (30 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. g3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Ndb4 8. Nxc6 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 Nxc6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    A15: English / A04: Reti Opening Opening Explorer (27 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. Nc3 e6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bf4 Bxf3 7. gxf3 >


    click for larger view

    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense Opening Explorer (27 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Nf3 c5 5.g3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3>


    click for larger view

    E21: Nimzo-Indian, Three Knight Opening Explorer (26 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 Nf6 6. c3 O-O 7. d4 cxd4 8. cxd4 d5 9. e5 Ne4 10. Bxc6 bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    B31: Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation Opening Explorer (26 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. cxd5 Nxd5 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Nb6 6. d3 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Bxc6+ bxc6 >


    click for larger view

    A16: English Opening Explorer (24 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Be7 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 c6 7. Qc2 g6 8. Bxf6 Bxf6 >


    click for larger view

    D43: Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Opening Explorer (19 games) [this looks like a bad trade-off for white, %-wise]

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    B01: Scandinavian Opening Explorer (18 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 d6 4. Nc3 g6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Bd3 O-O 7. Nf3 Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A56: Benoni Defense (5) / A40: Queen's Pawn Game (3) / A42: Modern Defense, Averbakh System; even B27: Sicilian Opening Explorer (14 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bb2 Bg4 4. e3 Nbd7 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A06: Reti Opening Opening Explorer (14 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <
    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. d5 Bg4 8. O-O Na6 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 >


    click for larger view

    E91: King's Indian (various openings actually) Opening Explorer (12 games, there are actually more games, if you go along, eg <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. d5 Bg4 8. O-O Na6 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nc7 11. Be3 Nd7 > with 20 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. b3 d5 2. Bb2 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e3 Nf6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. O-O e6 7. d3 Be7 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Bxc6 Bxc6 10. Ne5 >


    click for larger view

    A06: Reti Opening / A01: Nimzovich-Larsen Attack Opening Explorer (10 games [only])

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. e4 Nf6 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 >


    click for larger view

    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (7 games (only))

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ || ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ ♕ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 Bg4 3. c4 Nd7 4. e4 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 g6 >


    click for larger view

    A41: Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6) Opening Explorer (4 games (only))

    # <1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nc6 4. O-O Bg4 5. h3 Bh5 6. c3 a6 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 > 9 games

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. h4 c6 6. Bg5 O-O 7. Bxf6 Bxf6> (3 games)

    # <1. Nf3 d5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d3 Bg4 4. Bg5 h6 5. Bxf6 gxf6> G Welling vs G Tammert, 1986

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bf4 Nh5 5. Be5 f6 6. Bg3 Nxg3> Euwe vs Alekhine, 1935

    # <1.g3 Nf6 2.c4 d5 3.cxd5 Nxd5 4.Bg2 g6 5.Nc3 Nb6 6.Nf3 Bg7 7.d3 O-O 8.Be3 Nc6 9.Qc1 Bg4 10.h3 Bxf3 11.Bxf3> K Spraggett vs M Campbell, 1974

    50 games, 1923-2016

  3. 50_Queenless middlegames
    Queenless middlegames - where the ♕s will be traded-off as 1st or 2nd pair of pieces until move 15.

    <1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8>


    click for larger view

    Berlin Wall (C67) Opening Explorer (1,734 games, and counting) --> Game Collection: Kramnik with Berlin Wall by tesasembiring and others...

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. dxe5 dxe5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 >


    click for larger view

    E92: King's Indian Defense: Exchange Variation Opening Explorer (555 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e5 4. dxe5 dxe5 5. Qxd8+ Kxd8>


    click for larger view

    B07: Pirc Defense, General Opening Explorer (543 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e3 Nf6 4. Bxc4 e6 5. Nf3 c5 6. O-O a6 7. dxc5 Qxd1 8. Rxd1 Bxc5 >


    click for larger view

    D27: Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical Opening Explorer (291 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d4 exd4 6. Qxd4 Qxd4 7. Nxd4 >


    click for larger view

    C68: Ruy Lopez, Exchange Opening Explorer (244 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 6. d3 Nf6 7. Bg5 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 Be7 9. Nc3 >


    click for larger view

    C42 Russian Game: Cozio (Lasker) Attack Opening Explorer (233 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Bxc4 c5 6.O-O a6 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8>


    click for larger view

    D27: Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical Opening Explorer (225 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. O-O f6 6. d4 Bg4 7. dxe5 Qxd1 8. Rxd1 fxe5 >


    click for larger view

    C69: Ruy Lopez, Exchange, Gligoric Variation, 6.d4 Opening Explorer (200 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Qxd1+ 7.Kxd1>


    click for larger view

    A 14 English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. King's Indian Formation Opening Explorer (175 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 d6 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 dxe5 4. Qxd8+ Kxd8 >


    click for larger view

    Rat Defense: English Rat (A41) Opening Explorer (132 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Qd2 Nc6 10. Rc1 cxd4 11. cxd4 Qxd2+ 12. Kxd2 >


    click for larger view

    Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Modern Exchange Variation (D85) Opening Explorer (107 games, probably more due to transpositions or similar move orders)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    <1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. g3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Ndb4 8. Nxc6 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 Nxc6 >


    click for larger view

    A15: English / A04: Reti Opening Opening Explorer (49 games)

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♖ ♘ ♗ _ ♔ ♗ ♘ ♖ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    Other, rare lines

    # <1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e4 e5 4. Nf3 Bb4+ 5. Nc3 exd4 6. Qxd4 Qxd4 7. Nxd4 > (24 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 e5 6. dxe5 dxe5 7. Qxd8+ Kxd8 > (23 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 e5 7. dxe5 dxe5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 > (23 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. Bh4 c5 7. cxd5 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Qxd5 9. e3 Nc6 10. Be2 cxd4 11. cxd4 e5 12. dxe5 Qa5+ 13. Qd2 Qxd2+ 14. Kxd2 > (18 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 Na6 7. O-O e5 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. Qxd8 Rxd8 > (17 games)

    # <1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bb5+ Nc6 6. Qe2+ Qe7 7. dxc5 Qxe2+ 8. Nxe2 Bxc5 > (17 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 cxd4 6. Qxd4 exd5 7. e4 Nc6 8. Bb5 dxe4 9. Qxd8 Kxd8> (15 games)

    # <1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 4.cxd5 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Nc6 6.Qd1 exd5 7.Qxd5 Be6 8.Qxd8+ Rxd8> (13 games)

    # <1. e4 d5 2. d3 dxe4 3. dxe4 Qxd1+ 4. Kxd1 > (10 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 e5 5. dxe5 Nxe5 6. Nxe5 dxe5 7. Qxd8+ Kxd8 > (7 games)

    # <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. e3 e5 4. dxe5 d4 5. exd4 Qxd4 6. Qxd4 Nxd4 > (6 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. dxc5 dxc5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 > (6 games)

    # <1. c4 e5 2. g3 g6 3. d4 d6 4. dxe5 dxe5 5. Qxd8+ Kxd8> (5 games)

    # <1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 c6 4. d4 d6 5.dxe5 dxe5 6. Qxd8+ Kxd8> (5 games)

    # <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Na4 e5 6. dxe5 Nc6 7. a3 Nxe5 8. e4 Nb6 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8> (3 games)

    # <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. e3 e5 4. dxe5 dxc4 5. Qxd8+ Kxd8 6. Bxc4 Nxe5 > (2 games)

    # <1.c4 g6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.e3 O-O 6.Be2 dxc4 7.Bxc4 c5 8.d5 e6 9.dxe6 Qxd1+ 10.Kxd1> (2 games)

    # <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d3 Nf6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O d5 7. Nbd2 Be6 8. Qe2 dxe4 9. dxe4 Qd7 10. c3 Rad8 11. Nc4 Bxc4 12. Qxc4 Qd3 13. Qxd3 Rxd3> (1 game) Keene vs Ray Byrne, 1964

    82 games, 1894-2017

  4. 51a1_IQP on d4
    < "He who fears an Isolated Queen's Pawn should give up Chess." <>> ~ Siegbert Tarrasch

    < "The isolated Pawn casts gloom over the entire chessboard." <>> ~ Aaron Nimzowitsch

    <The essential disadvantage of the isolated pawn ... lies not in the pawn itself, but in the square in front of the pawn. <>> ~ Richard Reti

    This collection shows how to take advantage of the dynamic possibilities of the isolated d pawn. If the isolani manages to advance, look out! On the other hand, if it is firmly blockaded, it tends to become a liability that leads to a lost endgame as pieces are exchanged. I find this strategic struggle utterly fascinating.

    The Isolated Queen's Pawn (or as google translated it from Portugiese <the Pawn Isolated Lady> - L-O-L ) can play a dangerous role in attack, espeically when it advances to disorient the enemy army. Most games in this collection examplify this theme. However, sometimes it can be properly blockaded and eventually captured.

    'Understanding Pawn play in chess' by Drazen Marovic has a nice treatment of the subject of IQP. An equally good treatment is available in 'Pawn structure chess' by Andrew Soltis

    recommended/check:
    Game Collection: IQP / http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... / Game Collection: IQP wins / Game Collection: IQP loses / Game Collection: IQP / Game Collection: nexus IQP position

    * Game Collection: PANOV BOTVINNIK ATTACK

    These games all reach the same IQP position after 7 complete moves. There are myriad move orders to reach the position, including lines of the following openings: Alapin Sicilian, Panov Caro-Kann, Symmetrical English, Semi-Tarrasch, Scandinavian transfer to Panov. Botvinnik believed that studying certain structures which could arise from numerous openings was a good way to prepare. The main structure which Botvinnik studied was the Panov. I don't know if this exact position was one that he studied, but it seems to be a nexus for many openings which result in IQP positions. Some examples of players who have followed the main line continuation from the nexus position most frequently on the white side are Judit Polgar and Jovan Petronic. On the black side we see the Caro-Kann adherents Anatoly Karpov, Allan Stig Rasmussen, and especially Eduard Meduna. I will cite instances where the nexus position is mentioned in books when I find them. Soltis=the book by Soltis titled Pawn Structure Chess. I don't own a database to search so I am relying on online tools. Andrzej Maciejewski v Marek Vokac, Prague 1990 is the only master game I can find which follows the Alapin Sicilian to a position which could have resulted from the nexus: 1 e4 c5 2 c3 d5 3 exd5 Nf6 4 d4 cxd4 5 cxd4 Nxd5 6 Nc3 e6 7 Nf3 Be7 8 Bd3 0-0 9 0-0 Nc6. George-Gabriel Grigore v Serban Neamtu, Romania 1992 is an example of the move order from the Slav Exchange 1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 cxd5 cxd5 4 Nc3 Nc6 5 e4 Nf6 6 exd5 Nxd5 7 Nf3 e6. Here is another move order: Scandinavian, Kadas Gambit, transfer to Panov 1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Nf6 3 c4 c6 4 d4 cxd5 5 Nc3 Nc6 6 cxd5 Nxd5 7 Nf3 e6. These are the relevant ECO codes: A04, A15, A16, A17, A30, A34, A35, A40, A46, B01, B10, B13, B14, B21, B22, D02, D04, D10, D41, E10.


    click for larger view

    "Imagine the following pawn skeleton: White: pawns on a2, b2, d4, f2, g2, h2: Black: pawns on a7, b7, e6, f7, g7, h7. Despite its static weakness, the isolated pawn on d4 is filled with a certain dynamic power. We must distinguish with absolute accuracy between "static" and "dynamic" because this is the only way to understand completely. A static weakness shows up in the endgame and in two ways: firstly, the d4-pawn needs protection and, secondly, "neighbouring weak squares" show up clearly (e.g. the black king can try to get to c4 or e4 via d5). As far as dynamic strength is concerned, there is the pawn's lust to expand (d4-d5!) and in addition White can plan to leave his isolated pawn where it is and occupy one of the dynamically extremely valuable squares e5 or c5 which have been created by the d4-pawn."

    - Nimzowitsch, The Praxis of My System

    ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙ ♙

    Baburin, Winning Pawn Structures leider zur Zeit nicht mehr erhältlich (Juni 2007) 256 S., kart., Batsford 1998/2001, Euro 25,00

    " Zielgruppe: DWZ 1600-2350

    Eine Zeitlang war dieses Buch nicht erhältlich, dann doch wieder nachgedruckt - aber der Autor bat, das Buch nicht zu kaufen, wegen ungeklärter Honorarzahlungen. Im Moment scheint aber wieder alles in Ordnung, und wir dürfen dieses Buch ruhigen Gewissens empfehlen. Der erste Schwachpunkt eines sehr starken Buches ist - der Titel. Dieser sollte heißen Isolanistellungen. Denn Thema ist der klassische isolierte Damenbauer, entstehend aus Tarrasch-Verteidigung, Semi-Tarrasch, Caro-Kann/Panow-Angriff, Nimzowitsch-Indisch mit 4.e3, Sizilianisch 1.e4 c5 2.c3 d5 usw. Kürzer behandelt werden die verwandten Typen "Hängebauern" (z.B. nach Sd5xSc3 b2xc3 bei weißem Isolani d4) und "Widder" (sich gegenüberstehende Einzelbauern d4/d5). Der irisch-russische GM Baburin illustriert in überzeugender Weise alle typischen Angriffs-, Verteidigungs- und Endspielpläne. Und beileibe nicht nur die naheliegenden Pläne,die "jeder kennt" bzw. zu kennen meint! (z.B. die Standardopfer auf f7 und e6). Da kommt auch mal die Isolaniseite auf der c-Linie, bringt den Turm auf der 3. Reihe zum Einsatz (z.B. Ta1-a3-h3 oder Td1-d3-g3) oder spielt einen Angriff mittels h2-h4-h5 - ein weniger bekanntes, aber mitunter effektvolles Motiv. Das Buch ist mithin Pflicht für alle Spieler, bei denen Isolanistellungen eine wesentliche Stelle im Eröffnungsrepertoire einnimmt. Ein kleiner Vorbehalt nichtsdestotrotz: In den (ansonsten hervorragend ausgewählten!) Beispielen gewinnt praktisch immer die Isolaniseite, wenn sie Angriff/Initiative im Mittelspiel hat. Bzw. in typischen Endspielen, wo naturgemäß die gegen den Isolani spielende Seite den Vorteil hat, verdichtet sie diesen Vorteil in praktisch allen Beispielen zum Gewinn. Dies entspricht nicht der Realität! Wie sowohl das Gefühl wie auch ein Spezialrecherche in Datenbanken zeigt, bleibt ein typisches Endspiel - sagen wir mit Läufer und Springer beiderseits - in der Mehrzahl der Fälle remis; nur seltener führt der Vorteil auch zum ganzen Punkt. Umgekehrt führt längst nicht jede Stellung mit starkem Königsangriff der Isolaniseite zum Erfolg; die notorisch komplizierten Opferwendungen führen auch gern mal zum Dauerschach oder zu unklaren Positionen. Zwar zeigt Baburin jedesmal, wo die letztlich unterlegene Seite hätte besser spielen können. Trotzdem - ich habe ein bißchen Angst, daß solchermaßen im Kopf ein statistisch verzerrtes Abbild der Realität entsteht. Trotz dieses kleinen Vorbehaltes ein starkes Buch, einwandfrei produziert und mit umfangreichem Inhalt, so daß der Preis nicht so sehr schmerzt - verglichen mit einigen anderen teuren, dünnen und letztlich billig gemachten Batsford-Produktionen. Zur Zielgruppe: Obwohl die Arbeit an speziellen strategischen Formation (wie hier Isolanistellungen) erst ab ca. DWZ 1800 Sinn macht, scheint mir hier eine Ausnahme gegeben: Baburins Partiekommentare sind sehr eingängig und leichtverständlich. Auch der starke Turnierspieler (um 2200) kann zweifellos profitieren. Für Spieler ab IM-Stärke ist der Inhalt vielleicht doch wieder zu allgemein; wenig tiefe Analyse, wenig "Hyperpräzision", auch in Bezug auf die Eröffnungstheorie (hier würde ich mir z.B. noch präzisere Vergleiche in der Beurteilung verwandter Stellungen, die sich z.B. durch ein Tempo mehr/weniger oder eine andere Nuance unterscheiden, wünschen)." http://www.kaniaverlag.de/htm/tarra...

    212 games, 1877-2017

  5. 52a_Middlegames - -> The Q vs RBP thing
    [Construction site ahead] A collection of games where the material imbalance is ♕ vs ♖♗♙ or the like. aka <The Lasker Compensation < Ilyin-Zhenevsky vs Lasker, 1925 >> acc. to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsMG...

    <The average value of the queen (if the opposing side does not have the bishop pair) is that of a rook, a minor piece and 1½ pawns. The knight is fractionally stronger than the bishop when supporting the rook in its struggle against a queen. The value of a queen and pawn is the same as that of two rooks, when no minor pieces are present. When both sides have 2 or more minor pieces, the queen does not need a pawn to equal the two rooks in value. In the situation of queen against 2 rooks with 5-8 pawns on each side, the advantage of the rooks is a tiny one; when there are at the most 4 pawns per side, the rook has an advantage of approximately ½ a pawn. A queen and half a pawn equals 3 minor pieces.>

    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

    Check out for further candidate games: Endgame Explorer: RBPPP vs QPPPP

    [Event "Equipos"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2012"]
    [Round "2"]
    [White "Moskalenko, Viktor"]
    [Black "Cuartas, Jaime A"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteELO ""]
    [BlackELO ""]

    1. c4 c6 2. e4 e5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Nxe5 O-O 6. Be2 Re8 7. Nd3 Bxc3 8. dxc3 Nxe4 9. O-O Na6 10. f3 Nf6 11. Bg5 Nc7 12. Nf2 d5 13. Ng4 Bxg4 14. fxg4 Re6 15. Bd3 dxc4 16. Bxc4 Ncd5 17. Qd4 Qe8 18. Bxf6 Re4 19. Bxg7 Rxd4 20. Bxd4 Qd7 21. Rf5 h6 22. Bxd5 cxd5 23. Rf6 Re8 24. Rxh6 f6 25. Rf1 Qxg4 26. Rhxf6 Qh5 27. R6f3 Re4 28. Rf8+ 1-0

    <19.Bxg7!> / http://kevinspraggett.blogspot.com/ 2012, abt Febr6-8

    216 games, 1896-2017

  6. 52b_Midddlegames - The Q vs RN thing (and endgam
    <The average value of the queen (if the opposing side does not have the bishop pair) is that of a rook, a minor piece and 1½ pawns. The knight is fractionally stronger than the bishop when supporting the rook in its struggle against a queen. The value of a queen and pawn is the same as that of two rooks, when no minor pieces are present. When both sides have 2 or more minor pieces, the queen does not need a pawn to equal the two rooks in value. In the situation of queen against 2 rooks with 5-8 pawns on each side, the advantage of the rooks is a tiny one; when there are at the most 4 pawns per side, the rook has an advantage of approximately ½ a pawn. A queen and half a pawn equals 3 minor pieces.>

    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

    90 games, 1861-2017

  7. 52c_Middlegames_2 minor pieces for a Queen
    ....

    Our final theme is a striking one: the sacrifice of a queen for two minor pieces, a bit of centralisation and...well, not much else, it seems. Leonid Nikolayevich Yurtaev (RIP) is a major protagonist here; it seems he is only happy once he is a queen down....

    The world has been understandably slow to recognise the merits of these queen sacrifice ideas. [...]

    check out --> Game Collection: pure queen sacrifices

    <The average value of the queen (if the opposing side does not have the bishop pair) is that of a rook, a minor piece and 1½ pawns. The knight is fractionally stronger than the bishop when supporting the rook in its struggle against a queen. The value of a queen and pawn is the same as that of two rooks, when no minor pieces are present. When both sides have 2 or more minor pieces, the queen does not need a pawn to equal the two rooks in value. In the situation of queen against 2 rooks with 5-8 pawns on each side, the advantage of the rooks is a tiny one; when there are at the most 4 pawns per side, the rook has an advantage of approximately ½ a pawn. A queen and half a pawn equals 3 minor pieces.>

    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

    64 games, 1901-2014

  8. 52d_Middlegames_3 pieces for a Queen
    Games Like Onischuk vs E Perelshteyn, 2008

    <The average value of the queen (if the opposing side does not have the bishop pair) is that of a rook, a minor piece and 1½ pawns. The knight is fractionally stronger than the bishop when supporting the rook in its struggle against a queen. The value of a queen and pawn is the same as that of two rooks, when no minor pieces are present. When both sides have 2 or more minor pieces, the queen does not need a pawn to equal the two rooks in value. In the situation of queen against 2 rooks with 5-8 pawns on each side, the advantage of the rooks is a tiny one; when there are at the most 4 pawns per side, the rook has an advantage of approximately ½ a pawn. A queen and half a pawn equals 3 minor pieces.>

    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

    126 games, 1834-2017

  9. 53a_Middlegames: Positional Exchange Sacrifices
    Interne Nummerierung:

    1 = Petrosian
    2 = Kasparov
    3 = Kramnik
    4 = Karpov
    5 = Fischer
    6 = Carlsen
    7 = Andersson
    8 = Anand
    9 = Gelfand
    10 = Aronian
    11 = Botvinnik
    12 = Tal
    13 = Korchnoi
    14 = Topalov

    15 = Bronstein
    16 = Smyslov
    17 = Spasski
    18 = Geller
    19 = Alekhine
    20 = Keres
    21 = Tarrasch
    22 = Lasker
    23 = Capablanca
    24 = Shirov
    25 = Mamedyarov
    26 = Ivanchuk
    27 = Svidler

    < No Sacrifice, No Victory! <>> http://www.damnlol.com/i/cf1b08fc97...

    " Petrosian introduced the exchange sacrifice for the sake of 'quality of position', where the time factor, which is so important in the play of Alekhine and Tal, plays hardly any role. Even today, very few players can operate confidently at the board with such abstract concepts. Before Petrosian no one had studied this. By sacrificing the exchange 'just like that', for certain long term advantages, in positions with disrupted material balance, he discovered latent resources that few were capable of seeing and properly evaluating." ~ Kasparov

    ♖ = ♘ = ♗ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘ = ♖♗ = ♖♘ = ♖ = ♗ = ♘

    Intro: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_ex...

    Related and recommended game collections: Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice ; Game Collection: "Learn from the Legends" - Mihail Marin Section 5! ; Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice ; Game Collection: Deep Exchange Sacrifices, Part One: Petrosian ; Game Collection: The Exchange Sacrifice: A Practical Guide ;

    google search on <Exchange sacrifices>: http://www.google.de/#hl=de&sugexp=...

    Series on <the exchange sacrifice> on YOUTUBE by User: cludi:

    <1> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBVe...

    <2> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0N4E...

    <3> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDp-...

    <4> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndaX...

    <5> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW-l...

    <6> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9eo...

    <7> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfaS...

    <8> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__2c...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    Lecture on Exchange Sacrifices with GM Ben Finegold http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smTv...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    GM Alexander Ipatov shows one of his Exchange Sacrifices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nj1...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♘x♗ - ♖ - ♖ Qualitätsopfer als taktisches wie auch positionelles Kampfmittel werden zu selten angewandt, wahrscheinlich aus Furcht vor der materiellen Einbuße; dies vermutet der ungarische Autor (im Vorwort S. 3), der im dritten Band seiner Reihe "Kombinationen lernen und lehren" eine systematische Übersicht zu diesem Thema präsentiert.

    Ausgehend von drei ausführlich analysierten Partien des verstorbenen Exweltmeisters Tigran Petrosjan, des "größten Qualitätsopferers" (Zitat S. 7), bietet der Autor zunächst jeweils 35 Testpartien leichteren Kalibers ("A") und gehobener positioneller Qualitätsopferkunst ("B") in Bezug auf aktiv durchgeführte Qualitätsopfer an, gefolgt von je 25 Beispielen ("A" und "B") für passiv angebotene Opfer (S. 13-59). Jede Partie, teilweise mit kurzen Anmerkungen im Informatorstil versehen, wird bis zum kritischen Punkt vorgeführt, und nach dem folgenden Stellungsdiagramm soll der Leser die Fortsetzung finden. Lösungen und Partieschlüsse finden sich dann im Anhang (S. 90-109).

    Ganz ähnlich konzipiert sind die beiden abschließenden Kapitel über Qualitätsopfer in der Sizilianischen Verteidigung (meistens sT x wSc3 bzw. wT x sSh5) und in anderen Eröffnungen, wiederum jeweils 35 Partien am Stück (S. 60-89). 43 Schach - Sinnsprüche lockern den Text auf; von diesen z. T. weniger bekannten Zitaten hat mir eines besonders gut gefallen: "Derjenige, der sich nicht so zum Schachspielen hinsetzt, daß er siegen will und siegen muß, sondern lediglich darauf hofft, daß ein Versehen des Gegners ihm später zu einem unerwarteten Punkt verhilft und der, der den Gegner für stärker hält, kann keine Erfolge erringen. Einem feigen Schachspieler bereitet das Wettkampf - Schach kein Vergnügen, sondern unangenehme, seelenquälende Anspannung (Maróczy)" (Zitat S. 51). Zudem findet sich im Anhang ein Register aller 190 aufgeführten Partien (S. 110-115), die aus einem Zeitraum von 150 Jahren bis hin zur Gegenwart ausgewählt wurden.

    Das Konzept des Büchleins erscheint bemerkenswert, liefert es doch in systematisierter Form auf knappem Raum eine Fülle von Material zum bisher in der Schachliteratur etwas stiefmütterlich behandelten Thema des Qualitätsopfers. Hie und da wäre jedoch weniger mehr gewesen, denn manchmal vermißt man schon tiefergehende Erläuterungen zum Spielgeschehen. Gleichwohl bildet der Band natürlich eine wahre Fundgrube an taktischen und positionellen Ideen, die mit dem Qualitätsopfer verbunden sind.

    Rochade Europa 11/99

    Mit diesem Buch legt Imre Pál eine Abhandlung über ein Thema vor, das in den meisten Lehrbüchern ein wenig zu kurz kommt, nämlich das Qualitätsopfer. Als Einstieg zeigen 3 kommentierte Partien Petrosjans, der für diese Spezialität geradezu berüchtigt war, das Qualitätsopfer in Angriff und Verteidigung.

    Dann folgt der Haupteil des Buches: 120 Testpartien, die in zwei Schwierigkeitsstufen und in die Kategorien "aktiv" und "passiv" unterteilt sind. Zu jeder Partie gibt es die Notation (teilweise knapp kommentiert) bis zum Qualitätsopfer sowie das entsprechende Diagramm. Nun ist es Aufgabe des Lesers, sich den Sinn des Qualitätsopfers sowie die weitere Zugfolge zu erarbeiten, die Lösungen mit den wichtigsten Varianten befinden sich im Anhang.

    Im dritten Teil des Buches gibt es 70 weitere Beispielpartien, in denen jeweils das Qualitätsopfer eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Im Unterschied zu Teil 2 gibt es hier die komplette Partienotation, außerdem wurden diese Partien nach der Eröffnung geordnet. Den Abschluß bildet ein Register aller 190 enthaltenen Partien. Für Auflockerung sorgen einige Zitate berühmter Schachspieler.

    Fazit: Das Buch bereitet sein interessantes Thema sowohl inhaltlich als auch in der Gestaltung sehr ansprechend auf, und auch der Preis geht mit 22,80 DM in Ordnung.

    Schach-Markt 1/2000
    http://www.schachversand.de/e/detai...

    ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖ - ♖x♗x♘ - ♖ - ♖

    [Event "WC24/final"]
    [Site "ICCF"]
    [Date "2009.6.10"]
    [Round "-"]
    [White "Turgut, Tansel"]
    [Black "Kunzelmann, Dr. Fred"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteElo "2610"]
    [BlackElo "2464"]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Bb7 5.Bg2 Bb4+
    6.Bd2 Bxd2+ 7.Qxd2 O-O 8.Nc3 d6 9.d5 e5 10.O-O a5 11.Qc2 Nbd7 12.a3 Qe7 13.Nd2 h6 14.e3 Ra6 15.b3 Rfa8 16.Nb5 Nc5 17.Nb1 Bc8 18.N1c3 Ne8 19.f4 Bd7 20.Rae1 Rb8 21.Re2 Raa8 22.fxe5 Qxe5 23.Ref2 Qxe3 24.Kh1 f5 <25.Rxf5> Bxf5 26.Qxf5 Nf6 27.b4 axb4 28.axb4 Nd3 29.Qe6+ Qxe6 30.dxe6 Ra6 31.Nxc7 Ra7 32.N3b5 Ra2 33.e7 Nxb4 34.Re1 Nd3 35.Bd5+ Kh7 36.Re6 Ne5 37.Kg1 Rc8 38.Rxf6 gxf6 39.Nxd6 Rb8 40.e8=Q Rxe8 41.Ncxe8 h5 42.Be4+ f5 43.Nxf5 Ra1+ 44.Kg2 Ra2+ 45.Kh3 Kg6 46.Nd4+ Kh6 47.Bd5 Rf2 48.Nd6 Rd2 49.N4f5+ Kg6 50.Ne3 Rb2 51.Ng2 Kg5 52.Ne1 Kf6 53.Nf3 Ng4 54.Bc6 Ke7 55.Nf5+ Kf6 56.N5d4 Ne3 57.Be8 Nxc4 58.Bxh5 b5 59.g4 Kg7 60.g5 b4 61.Kg3 b3 62.Bg4 1-0

    [Event "Ho Chi Minh City ch-VIE"]
    [Date "2010.??.??"]
    [White "Bui Vinh, "]
    [Black "Nguyen Huynh Minh Huy, "]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteElo "2480"]
    [BlackElo "2469"]
    [ECO "A28"]

    1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bb4 6. g3 Ne4 7. Qd3 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Be7 9. Bg2 Ne5 10. Qe4 d6 11. f4 Nd7 12. O-O O-O 13. Ba3 Nb6 14. Qd3 c5 15. Nc2 Be6 16. Ne3 Qc7 17. Rab1 Rad8 18. f5 Bc8 19. f6 Bxf6 20. Rxf6 gxf6 21. Rxb6 Qxb6 22. Nd5 Qa5 23. Bc1 f5 24. Qe3 Kh8 25. Qe7 Rg8 26. Qf6 Rg7 27. h4 Be6 28. h5 h6 29. Bxh6 Rdg8 30. Bxg7 Rxg7 31. h6 1-0

    [Event "URS-ch27"]
    [Site "Leningrad"]
    [Date "1960.??.??"]
    [White "Bronstein, David I"]
    [Black "Petrosian, Tigran V"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "B10"]

    1. e4 c6 2. Ne2 d5 3. e5 c5 4. d4 Nc6 5. c3 e6 6. Nd2 Nge7 7. Nf3 cxd4 8. Nexd4 Ng6 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Bd3 Qc7 11. Qe2 f6 12. exf6 gxf6 13. Nd4 Kf7 14. f4 c5 15. Qh5 cxd4 16. Bxg6+


    click for larger view

    hxg6 17. Qxh8 dxc3 18. Qh7+ Bg7 19. Be3 cxb2 20. Rd1 Ba6 21. f5 exf5 22. Qh3 Qc2 23. Qf3 Bc4 0-1

    check also the following collections:

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 1

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 2

    - Game Collection: Exchange sacs - 3

    150 = pre WWI
    160 = 1914-1944
    174-177 = 1945-1979
    180 = 1980-1989
    190 = 1990-1999

    200-209 = 2000-2009
    300-306 = 2010-2016

    = = =

    People in Greenland can differentiate between 36 kinds of snow; the Swedish IM <Ari Ziegler> will teach you to differentiate between <20 kinds of exchange sacrifice>. His systematic approach to exchange sacrifices will rapidly enhance your understanding of one of the most exciting and difficult aspects of chess. Your widened horizon will help you to be able to follow the games of top GMs better and also to see more options in your own positions, which in turn will improve your chess results. https://shop.chessbase.com/en/produ...

    Der schwedische IM <Ari Ziegler> behandelt auf dieser DVD Möglichkeiten, Stellungsbewertungen durch ein Qualitätsopfer plötzlich zu verändern. In den meisten Schachspielern ist die Wertigkeit der Figuren fest verankert, man weiß, dass ein Turm mehr wert ist als eine Leichtfigur, er beträgt ungefähr das Äquivalent zu Leichtfigur und zwei Bauern. Somit kommt es nicht oft vor, dass man in seinen Partien so ein Qualitätsopfer überhaupt andenkt, spielt doch einfach die Angst vor dem Verlust einer Schwerfigur eine zu große Rolle. Zudem erscheinen die Möglichkeiten und Konsequenzen eines solchen Opfers oft nicht überschaubar. Welche Stellungen erlauben eigentlich so ein Qualitätsopfer? Wie kann man die Chance zu solch einer Spielweise in den eigenen Partien überhaupt erst erkennen? Reicht die Kompensation für den Verlust des Turmes aus oder führt der Tausch einfach schnell in ein verlorenes Endspiel? Diese und viele Fragen mehr beantwortet Ziegler auf dieser ausgesprochen gut gelungenen Mittelspiel-DVD.

    Der Autor zeigt nicht nur eine Ansammlung von Beispielen aus der Großmeisterpraxis, sondern er bespricht die Partien systematisch: Wie kann man die Qualität opfern, um eine Festungsstellung zu erlangen? Falls man eine Leichtfigur auf e3/e6 oder d3/d6 etablieren kann, ist dies oft mehr wert als der Verlust der Qualität. Trifft dies immer zu oder gibt es Ausnahmen? Wie kann man mittels eines Turmopfers die gegnerische Königsstellung ins Wanken bringen? Wieso kann Schwarz so oft in der sizilianischen Verteidigung einen Turm für den Springer auf c3 opfern? Warum ist das Läuferpaar + Bauer in der Regel genauso stark wie Turm und Springer des Gegners? Diese und etliche andere Fragen beantwortet Ziegler umfassend. Die gezeigten Beispiele sind meist aggressiver Art, d.h. die Partei, die das Material hergibt, bekommt dafür in der Regel eine sehr aktive Position mit Initiative und Angriffsmöglichkeiten, in der der zweite Turm des Gegners zumeist passiv ist und seine numerische Überlegenheit gegenüber der Leichtfigur des Gegners nicht ausspielen kann.

    Mich hat diese systematische Herangehensweise an dieses komplexe Mittelspielthema sehr angenehm überrascht. Hat man in der Vergangenheit öfter über Qualitätsopfer in Großmeisterpartien gestaunt und sich gefragt, wie man überhaupt auf so einen Gedanken kommt und wie sich der Spieler sicher sein kann, dass diese Spielweise in der Stellung funktioniert, erhält man hier selbst das Rüstzeug, um die Wertigkeit des Turmes neu einzuschätzen. Wenn man die Beispiele auf der DVD gesehen und verstanden hat, wird man sein Verständnis des Mittelspiels nachhaltig verbessern. Gewisse Stellungen werden dann unter einem anderen Blickwinkel gesehen werden, da man die Möglichkeit eines Qualitätsopfers in Betracht zieht, was einem womöglich sonst niemals in den Sinn gekommen wäre. Ziegler gibt dem Zuhörer einige Richtlinien an die Hand, damit dieser die Partie auch nach dem Qualitätsopfer richtig weiterspielen kann. Oft ist es nämlich derart, dass nach so einem unerwarteten Opfer der Gegner völlig aus dem Konzept gebracht wird und es nicht schafft, sich der neuen Situation anzupassen. Das macht Fehler sehr wahrscheinlich. Dieser psychologische Effekt, der ja mit einer zum Teil radikalen Stellungsänderung einhergeht, könnte im Prinzip nur mit einer neuen objektiven Betrachtung der Stellung neutralisiert werden, was aber oft nicht gelingt. Der Autor zeigt ein ums andere Mal Beispiele, die das belegen. Tatsache ist, dass man nicht auf das Material achtet und die scheinbar stärkere Figur opfert, sondern im Prinzip nur die Stellung in eine überlegene Position verwandelt. Wie man dann diese Positionen zum Sieg ausspielen kann, erklärt der Autor natürlich auch ausführlich.

    Ari Ziegler präsentiert die Stellungen meist in angenehm langsamer und ruhiger Art, sodass man den Kern der Sache versteht und dem Gesagten gut folgen kann, auch wenn er manchmal das Tempo anzieht und durch die Partien sprintet, aber dies ist natürlich auch der Menge des Materials geschuldet. Eine ausgezeichnete Darbietung eines schwierigen Mittelspielthemas, welches jedem Schachfreund einen Entwicklungsschub für sein eigenes Spiel geben sollte. Sehr empfehlenswert!

    Schach-Zeitung https://www.schachversand.de/d/deta...

    403 games, 1834-2017

  10. 53b_Middlegames: Positional Pawn Sacrifice
    Pawn sacs for initiative, tempo, open up diagonals, enable manoeuvering, free squares

    pattern recognition: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv93...

    [Event "Golden Sands Europe op 2nd"]
    [Date "2013.06.12"]
    [Round "3"]
    [White "Sagar, Shah"]
    [Black "Sofranov, Velizar"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E69"]
    [WhiteElo "2359"]
    [BlackElo "2154"]
    [PlyCount "53"]

    1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. O-O d6 6. d4 Nbd7 7. Nc3 e5 8. e4 Re8 9. h3 exd4 10. Nxd4 Nc5 11. Re1 c6 12. Qc2 a5 13. Be3 a4 14. Rad1 Qa5 15. f4 h5 16. Bf2 Nfd7 17. a3 Bh6 18. Nf3 Bf8 19. e5 dxe5 20. f5 Kg7 21. Nh4 g5 22. f6+ Nxf6 23. Nf5+ Kg8 24. Nd6 Bd7 25. Nxe8 Rxe8 26. Qd2 Ne6 27. Ne4 1-0


    click for larger view

    <19.e5!>

    27 games, 1936-2016

  11. 53c_Middlegames_Positional piece sacrifices
    Positional piece sacrifices

    Play through these games and find out the compensation the players got.

    80 games, 1881-2017

  12. 54a_Push it to geefor, baby (modern g4 pawn sac)
    "The move g4 looks a bit excentric at first sight but has nowadays become quite mainstream in a lot of 1.d4-openings" GM Jan Gustafsson

    = = ♙g4 = = ♔ ♔ ♔ = = ♙g4 = = || = = ♙g4 = = ♔ ♔ ♔ = = ♙g4 = =

    From Alexei Shirov's book, Fire on Board, in the intro to the game Shirov vs T Thorhallsson, 1992 <"This game introduces a novelty which should probably be called the "Shabalov-Shirov Gambit", as suggested by Mikhail Krasenkov. As I remember, 'Shaba' expressed the idea first, although it occurred to us almost simultaneously while we were listening to pop music and lazily moving the pieces around.">

    = = ♙g4 = = ♔ ♔ ♔ = = ♙g4 = = || = = ♙g4 = = ♔ ♔ ♔ = = ♙g4 = =

    Set up d5,c6,e6,Nf6 is usually played by solid positional players. Let us add some fire by means of <Shabalov-Shirov attack> ;)

    The main ideas:

    1) Black ignores Whites threat: 7..0-0
    White should advance 8.g5 and orginize a King side shtorm. Set-up: developing Bd2, Ng5 and meet h6 with h4, central breal e4, after f5 always open g-file by means of gf. King may either stay in the center or long castle.

    2) Black grabs the pawn and waves the following storm...

    Some examples:

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nf3 c6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. g4 >


    click for larger view

    Opening Explorer (551 games) related collections:

    <1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 d5 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bf4 O-O 7.e3 Nbd7 8.g4> = Grischuk vs Caruana, 2015

    <1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Qc2 h6 7. Bf4 c6 8. e3 Nbd7 9. g4> = A Jaunooby vs W Phillips, 2012

    <1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 5.a4 e6 6.Bf4 a5 7.e3 Be7 8.g4> = Caruana vs Tomashevsky, 2015

    35 games, 1992-2015

  13. 55d_Middlegame motifs - Alekhine's gun
    There is nothing stronger than a line-up of all three heavy pieces in a file (or rank).

    It's fun to observe it.

    <Alekhine's gun> is a formation in chess named after the former World Chess Champion, Alexander Alekhine. This formation was named after a game he played against another illustrious Grandmaster, Aaron Nimzowitsch in San Remo 1930, ending with Alekhine’s victory. The idea consists of placing the two rooks stacked one behind another and the queen at the rear. This can lead to massive damage to the opponent as it usually marks the beginning of the final assault (in this case it was only four moves before resignation). In rare cases it can be two queens and one rook on the same file.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alekhi...

    Pure gun with <Qd3/Rd5/Rd7>

    [Event ""]
    [Site "San Sebastian"]
    [Date "2012.4.2"]
    [Round ""]
    [White "Spraggett,K"]
    [Black "Piasetski,L"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteELO ""]
    [BlackELO ""]

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 b6 4. c3 Qd7 5. Nf3 Ne7 6. Na3 Ba6 7. Bxa6 Nxa6 8. Qe2 Nb8 9. O-O Nf5 10. Nc2 h5 11. Ne3 g6 12. Rd1 Nc6 13. b3 Nce7 14. c4 c6 15. a4 Bg7 16. Ba3 Nxe3 17. fxe3 O-O 18. e4 Rae8 19. Bd6 dxe4 20. Qxe4 f5 21. Qf4 Rf7 22. Rd3 Nc8 23. Ba3 Bf8 24. Bb2 Ne7 25. Rad1 Rh7 26. Ng5 Rh8 27. Qh4 Bh6 28. Rf1 Bxg5 29. Qxg5 Rh7 30. Ba3 Rg7 31. Rfd1 Kh7 32. h3 Ng8 33. Kh1 Nh6 34. Bb2 Nf7 35. Qe3 Qe7 36. d5 c5 37. dxe6 Qxe6 38. Rd7 a5 39. R1d5 g5 40. Qd3 Kg8 41. Rb7 Rg6 42. Qc3 g4 43. Rdd7 Rg7 44. h4 g3 45. Qf3 Qg6 46. Kg1 Re6 47. Qf4 Qg4 48. Qxg4 hxg4 49. Re7 Rxe7 50. Rxe7 Nh6 51. Rxg7+ Kxg7 52. e6+ Kf8 53. Bc1 f4 54. Bxf4 Nf5 55. Bg5 Nd4 56. e7+ Kf7 57. h5 Ne6 58. Bh4 Ng7 59. h6 Ne8 60. Bxg3 1-0

    http://kevinspraggett.blogspot.de/2...

    check Game Collection: Three heavy pieces on the file for more

    123 games, 1878-2017

  14. 55e_Middlegames - strategic OUTPOST !
    Approaches:

    * An <outpost> is a square where you can keep a piece where your opponent can’t capture the piece without giving up a material advantage.

    * <Outposts> can be one of the most important strategies in a chess game as it allows you to have a huge spacial advantage and puts constant pressure on your opponent’s position.

    * An <outpost> is a square of strategic importance, usually located on an open or semi-open file. This square hosts a piece which is supported by a pawn and cannot be dislodged by an enemy pawn.

    = = =

    * An <outpost> is a square on the fifth, sixth, or seventh rank which is protected by a pawn and which cannot be attacked by an opponent's pawn. Such a square is a hole for the opponent (Hooper & Whyld 1992)....

    * <Outposts> are a favourable position from which to launch an attack, particularly using a knight.

    * Knights are most efficient when they are close to the enemy's stronghold. This is because of their short reach, something not true of bishops, rooks and queens. They are also more effective in the centre of the board than on the edges. Therefore, the ideal to be aimed at is an <outpost> in one of the central (c, d, e or f) files in an advanced position (e.g. the sixth rank) with a knight.

    * Knowledge of <outposts> and their effectiveness is crucial in exploiting situations involving an isolated queen's pawn.

    On the other hand, <Nimzowitsch> argued when the <outpost> is in one of the flank (a, b, g and h) files the ideal piece to make use of the <outpost> is a rook. This is because the rook can put pressure on all the squares along the rank.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outpos...
    = = = = = =

    http://www.chess-game-strategies.co...

    https://www.sparkchess.com/mysterio...

    https://www.chess.com/forum/view/ge...

    = = =

    Collections on outposts: Game Collection Search

    57 games, 1894-2017

  15. 56_IPC = Irish Pawn Centre/middlegame-structure
    What exactly is defining an 'Irish pawn centre', and what crime have the Irish people committed that their name is related to this pawn formation?

    An approach:

    - An isolated triple pawn, usually on the c- or f-file. - Short uses this expression to characterise the (unfavourable) black pawn formation with tripled pawns. - Tripled pawns were named the Irish Pawn Centre by Tony Miles when he saw E Keogh vs F J Sanz Alonso, 1978 won by the Irish player Keogh.

    "It was a joke made - in good humour - by the late Tony Miles. He was playing in a Zonal tournament alongside the Irish player Keogh, who had a game with tripled pawns. Miles christened this the 'IPC' - and proceeded to beat Keogh in the next round, using - what else? - tripled pawns. Miles vs E Keogh, 1978

    The article by Miles was reprinted in the book It's Only Me." [as narrated by User: Domdaniel ]

    = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = =

    A recent example of Ireland’s contribution to chess is what has erroneously been called the “Irish Pawn Centre”. Technically, it is actually the “Irish Pawn Formation” - to give it its correct term - as this pawn structure can occur anywhere on the board.

    There are arguments in both academic and ecclesiastical circles as to whether this pawn formation is due to Ireland being a Roman Catholic country, where the Holy Trinity is a pillar of Christian belief – perhaps due to the formation resembling a pillar comprised of a trinity of pawns.

    There are dark rumours that the Irish "school" is working (in secret) on the "Shamrock" or “Four-leafed Clover Formation” - featuring quadrupled pawns - which may soon be unleashed on some poor unsuspecting GM or World Champion in a tournament or simul. [It’s believed that this is a “black” project - under the code-name “Seamróg” - led by IM Sam Collins, into obscure opening lines which might lead to this even more frighteningly lethal pawn formation.]

    Another example of how Christianity in Ireland may be influencing chess, according to academia, is the popular belief in the extraordinary power of the bishops – whether one on its own or, especially, with two in communion.

    Of course, there's also the other side of the coin – concerning the influence of alcohol on chess, resulting in premature and violent attacks involving unsound sacrifices.

    Perhaps the “Goal” of the Irish “school” could be described as “belief and spirit”!? http://www.icu.ie/articles/display....

    = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = =

    The Irish pawn centre - A club players view by Paul Taaffe

    Recently I read an article by Alexander Baburin in the Irish Chess Journal entitled One risky idea in the opening or The Irish pawn centre, and later came across an expanded version in Kingpin No.30 called Winning with the Irish pawn centre?! As Baburin explained the Irish pawn centre is a position with triple isolated pawns. It was Tony Miles who named it thus after witnessing Eamon Keogh use the structure in the Amsterdam zt, 1978. Miles then had the cheek to use it to beat Eamon in a later round of the same tournament. Even the great Smyslov used it to beat Botvinnik twice in world championship matches!

    Right now you’re probably asking yourself "What has all this got to do with me? I’m only an ordinary club player". The answer is, it has a lot to do with you, and I am going to show you that the Irish pawn centre can be just as devastating in the hands of a so called "ordinary club player". The story begins just after I had finished reading the above mentioned copy of the ICJ. I was lying on my sofa thinking "I know I have seen that structure somewhere before". Then it came to me, I used the Irish pawn centre myself to beat Tony Duffy two years ago, and I didn’t even know what it was called then! <Now I don’t mean any disrespect to Keogh, Miles or Baburin, but when I heard that Smyslov used the IPC to defeat Botvinnik I thought to myself "Now I’m in GOOD company".> Anyway, enough talk, lets look at the game. http://www.gmsquare.com/Baburin/new...
    See the game: http://www.gmsquare.com/Baburin/che...

    = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = =

    There's a bunch of French (Winawer) Defense games, mainly ECO C15, C18 and C19 where a c2/c3/c5 IPC appears. This was a dangerous weapon in the hands of former World Champion Vasily Smyslov check out the collection for his games.

    = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = = ♙♙♙ = =

    <Is there any example of a <quatro-pawn?<>>


    click for larger view

    after <22.bxc4> in

    [Event "Balatonbereny op"]
    [Site "Balatonbereny"]
    [Date "1994.??.??"]
    [Round "8"]
    [White "Kovacs, Gabor"]
    [Black "Barth, Rainer"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [ECO "B02"]
    [WhiteElo "2225"]
    [BlackElo "2305"]
    [PlyCount "87"]
    [EventDate "1994.09.??"]
    [EventType "swiss"]
    [EventRounds "9"]

    1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4 c6 5. d4 g6 6. Nge2 Be6 7. Bb3 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Bxb3 9. axb3 Bg7 10. O-O O-O 11. f4 Na6 12. Ba3 Re8 13. Qd3 Qb6 14. f5 c5 15. fxg6 fxg6 16. Qc4+ e6 17. dxc5 Qc6 18. Rad1 b5 19. Nd4 Qxg2+ 20. Kxg2 bxc4 21. Nb5 Reb8 22. bxc4 Rc8 23. Nd6 Rc6 24. Ne4 Rac8 25. Rd7 R6c7 26. Rd6 Rc6 27. Rfd1 Bf8 28. Rxc6 Rxc6 29. Rd8 Kf7 30. Rd7+ Be7 31. Rxa7 h6 32. Bc1 g5 33. h4 gxh4 34. Bf4 e5 35. Bxe5 Re6 36. Nd6+ Kg6 37. Bd4 Nb8 38. Ra8 Nc6 39. Rg8+ Kh5 40. Nf5 Rg6+ 41. Rxg6 Kxg6 42. Nxe7+ Nxe7 43. Kh3 Nc6 44. Kxh4 1/2-1/2

    Lesenswert: All About Doubled Pawns by IM Larry Kaufman http://home.comcast.net/~danheisman...

    Finally here is one of the most unknown facts in chess history for you: Augustus J. Dirp (1841-1907) was of Irish descent! Game Collection: DIRP! :D

    98 games, 1859-2017

  16. 58c_middelgames - BB vs NN
    <1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.Qxc3 Ne4 7.Qc2 Nc6 8.e3 e5 9.cxd5 Qxd5 10.Bc4 Qa5+ 11.b4 Nxb4 12.Qxe4 Nc2+ 13.Ke2 Qe1+ 14.Kf3 Nxa1 15.Bb2 O-O 16.Kg3>

    Pos. after <16.Kg3>:


    click for larger view

    Watson wrote about this position:
    <After a lengthy forced sequence, we arrive at a position which has been tossed back and forth for at least 65 years without resolution! Unlike some other examples we have seen, White has plenty of his own tactical chances here, mainly by direct attack against the king...>

    Uh, excuse me? Opening Explorer

    Houdini 1.03 w32 2_CPU @ 23 ply depth:

    1) 16... Kh8 17. h4 Qd2 18. Bxa1 Qc1 19. Bd3 f5 20. Qxe5 Qxa1 21. Qe7 f4+ 22. Kh2 Bf5 23. Nh3 Qc3 24. Bxf5 Rxf5 25. Nxf4 Raf8 26. Rb1 b6 27. Rb5 c5 28. Qxa7 Rxf4 29. exf4 Qxd4 30. Qxb6 Qxf4+ 31. Kh3 Qf5+ 32. Kh2 -0.13

    2) 16... Bd7 17. Nf3 Qxh1 18. Ng5 g6 19. Qxe5 Qd1 20. h3 Bxh3 21. gxh3 Qg1+ 22. Kf3 Qh1+ 23. Kg3 Qg1+ 24. Kf3 0.00

    3) 16... Qd1 17. Nf3 Qxh1 18. Ng5 g6 19. Bxf7+ Rxf7 20. Nxf7 Kxf7 21. Qxe5 Qb1 22. Qxc7+ Ke6 23. Qe5+ Kd7 24. Qd5+ Ke7 25. Qc5+ Ke8 26. Qe5+ Kd8 27. Qg5+ Kc7 28. Qe5+ Kd8 29. Qg5+ 0.00

    4) 16... a5 17. Nf3 Qxh1 18. Ng5 g6 19. Bxf7+ Rxf7 20. Qd5 Be6 21. Qxe6 Raf8 22. Nxf7 Rxf7 23. d5 Qe1 24. Qc8+ Rf8 25. Qe6+ Rf7 26. Qc8+ 0.00

    5) 16... Rb8 17. Nf3 Qxh1 18. Ng5 g6 19. Bxf7+ Rxf7 20. Nxf7 Kxf7 21. Qxe5 Bd7 22. d5 Rg8 23. Qxc7 Re8 24. Qxd7+ Re7 25. Qd6 Qd1 26. Qf4+ Ke8 27. Qb8+ Kf7 28. Qf4+ Ke8 0.00

    Find similar games: Games Like S Atalik vs Sax, 1997

    <1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 e5 7. Nc3 Bb4 8. Bd2 Bxc3 9. bxc3 Qd6 >


    click for larger view

    D07: Queen's Gambit Declined, Chigorin Defense (48 games) Opening Explorer

    113 games, 1872-2017

  17. 61_Double rook sacrifices
    The two Rook sacrifice is one of the most thrilling themes in chess. And when it works, it's triumph of mind over matter. When it doesn't, at least the game is over quickly!

    check out Game Collection: 0 One side sacs both of it's rooks. For certain compensation, e.g. mate ;D

    <Take My Rooks> by Nikolay Minev and Yasser Seirawan; ISBN: 187947901X | edition 1991 | 110 pages | The authors have painstakingly researched the chess archives to find examples of these classic double-rook sacrifices. Starting with the Immortal Game, the authors systematically show the situations necessary for this sacrifice.

    26 games, 1842-2012

  18. Advanced tactics
    301 games, 1852-2016

  19. Amusing Games
    Oddball or funny games
    105 games, 1620-2007

  20. Apocalypse now - Chess, Controversy and charges
    This is a collection presenting interesting controversies to you which were a part of chess and chessgames.com since their beginnings. I hope that you will enjoy those games and the comments even more!

    Just for your orientation: My ignore list is empty

    35 games, 1862-2009

<< previous | page 1 of 4 | next >>

SEARCH ENTIRE GAME COLLECTION DATABASE
use these two forms to locate other game collections in the database

Search by Keyword:

EXAMPLE: Search for "QUEEN SAC" or "ENDING".
Search by Username:


NOTE: You must type their screen-name exactly.


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC