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Chess Game Collections
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  1. "Larsen's Selected Games" by Bent Larsen
    This is a collection of all 50 games from Bent Larsen's book, "Larsen's Selected Games of Chess", published in 1969.
    50 games, 1951-1969

  2. 50 games better than that other Tal game.
    51 games, 1953-1989

  3. alexsandyer's favorite games
    72 games, 1954-2016

  4. All Time Greats Play the French w/Black & Win
    Numerous Games from French Innovators/Experts Including: Nimzowitsch, Botvinnik, Korchnoi, Petrosian, Bareev, Nakamura, Dreev, Grischuk, Maroczy, Caruana, Morozevich, Vaganian, Blackburne, Burn, Tarrasch, Alekhine, Bogoljubov, etc.
    251 games, 1834-2017

  5. Attack & Counterattack in Chess
    Converting on Superior Mobility
    39 games, 1619-1953

  6. AVRO 1938
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by AVRO (1938)

    In November 1938 a Dutch radio company AVRO (Algemeene Vereeniging voor Radio Omroep) organized and sponsored what was up to that time the strongest tournament ever held. AVRO (literally the General Association for Radio Broadcasting) brought together the World Champion and every one of his major challengers. It ran from the 6th of November to the 27th of November 1938 with the players based in Amsterdam and each successive round played in a different Dutch town. This tournament schedule proved to be tough for the older competitors and Capablanca and Alyekhin did not fare as well as might have been expected. In the end Keres and Fine finished in joint first place with Keres declared the winner as a result of a better tie-break score.

    -

    table[

    1. Keres * * 1 1 1 2. Fine 0 * * 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 3. Botvinnik 0 * * 1 0 1 1 4. Alyekhin 0 0 0 * * 1 1 1 5. Euwe 0 1 1 0 * * 0 0 1 1 6. Reshevsky 0 0 1 0 1 * * 1 7. Capablanca 0 0 0 1 0 * * 1 8. Flohr 0 0 0 0 0 * *]table

    -


    56 games, 1938

  7. B20 Sicilians
    2 games, 2009

  8. B99: Sicilian Najdorf - Black Wins!
    10 games, 1957-2009

  9. Bad Kissingen 1928
    Bad Kissingen (1928)
    Twelve of the best masters around came to the Bavarian spa town of Bad Kissingen for an all-star tournament: Efim Bogoljubov, Jose Raul Capablanca, Max Euwe, Frank James Marshall, Jacques Mieses, Aron Nimzowitsch, Richard Reti, Akiba Rubinstein, Rudolf Spielmann, Siegbert Tarrasch, Savielly Tartakower, Fred Dewhirst Yates.

    While this was an opportunity for Capablanca to regain some of his luster after the match with Alekhine, it was Bogoljubov who pulled another one of those commanding performances out of his hat to finish on top by a point. Such performances provided a good reason for Alekhine to pick him as a match opponent.

    A big push in the middle of the tournament gave Bogoljubov a 1.5 point lead over Capablanca, whom Spielmann had defeated in round 6 for what would prove to be his only victory in the event. Capablanca got to within 1/2 point by defeating Bogoljubov in round 9, but no closer. The tournament also saw an excellent performance by Max Euwe, who stayed near the top before fading at the very end.

    Bad Kissingen, Germany, 12-24 August 1928

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 Pts
    1 Bogoljubov * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 8.0
    2 Capablanca 1 * 1 1 0 1 7.0
    3 Euwe * 1 1 0 1 0 1 6.5
    4 Rubinstein 0 0 * 1 1 1 1 6.5
    5 Nimzowitsch 0 * 0 1 1 1 6.0
    6 Reti 0 0 * 1 1 5.5
    7 Tartakower 0 1 0 0 * 1 5.0
    8 Marshall 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 1 5.0
    9 Yates 0 0 1 0 * 1 5.0
    10 Spielmann 0 1 0 0 * 4.5
    11 Tarrasch 0 0 0 * 4.0
    12 Mieses 0 0 0 0 0 * 3.0

    <Cumulative round-by-round scores> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 Bogoljubov 1.0 1.5 2.0 3.0 3.5 4.5 5.5 6.5 6.5 7.5 8.0 2 Capablanca 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.5 3.5 4.0 5.0 6.0 6.5 7.0 3 Euwe 0.5 1.5 1.5 2.5 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 6.0 6.0 6.5 4 Rubinstein 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 2.5 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.5 5.5 6.5 5 Nimzowitsch 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.5 3.0 3.5 3.5 3.5 4.5 5.0 6.0 6 Reti 0.5 0.5 1.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 3.0 3.5 4.0 5.0 5.5 7 Tartakower 0.0 0.5 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.0 3.5 4.5 4.5 5.0 8 Marshall 0.5 1.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.5 4.5 5.0 5.0 9 Yates 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 2.5 2.5 3.0 4.0 5.0 10 Spielmann 0.5 1.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 4.5 4.5 11 Tarrasch 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 4.0 12 Mieses 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 2.5 3.0 3.0

    66 games, 1928

  10. Baden Baden 1925
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Baden-Baden (1925)

    For a number of years following the First World War Germany had seen no great international tournaments. Indeed the last such event of this type was Mannheim 1914 (See Game Collection: Mannheim 1914 - the unfinished tournament) which the outbreak of the war had brought to a premature conclusion. Lamenting this sad state of affairs Dr Tarrasch approached the municipal authorities of the famous old Spa-town of Baden Baden which had been the site of an international tournament in 1870 (See Game Collection: Baden-Baden 1870). Their response was favourable and the organisation of the event was placed in the good doctor's hands. Most of the invitees accepted but both Dr Lasker and Capablanca insisted on large appearance fees which were unable to be met. Other absentees were Vidmar and Maroczy who were unable to attend because of work commitments. The final entry consisted of twenty-one competitors including Dr Tarrasch himself and the tournament ran from the 15th of April to the 14th of May 1925. The final result was a great win for Alyekhin and foreshadowed his later triumphs at San Remo 1930 (See Game Collection: San Remo 1930) and Bled 1931 (See Game Collection: Bled 1931).

    Crosstable :

    table[

    1.Alyekhin * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2.Rubinstein * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3.Saemisch 0 * 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 4.Bogolyubov 0 * 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 5.Marshall 0 1 1 * 1 0 1 1 1 1 6.Tartakover 1 0 * 1 1 1 1 1 7.Rabinovich 0 1 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 8.Gruenfeld 1 * 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1` 9.Niemzowitsch 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 10.Torre 0 0 1 * 0 1 1 1 1 11.Reti 0 0 0 1 1 0 * 1 1 0 1 0 1 12.Treybal 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 * 1 0 1 1 1 13.Spielmann 0 0 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 14.Carls 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 1 15.Yates 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 * 0 0 0 1 0 1 16.Rosselli 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 1 0 17.Tarrasch 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 0 18.Colle 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 * 0 1 1 19.Mieses 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 * 1 1 20.Thomas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 * 21.te Kolste 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 * ]table


    210 games, 1925

  11. Beating the Nimzo-Indian D - Top GM Games
    43 games, 1920-2017

  12. Bled 1931
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Bled (1931)

    Milan Vidmar was the instigator of the major chess tournament that became Bled 1931. His idea was well received in both Ljubljana ( his birthplace ) and the nearby health resort of Bled. An organizing committee was set up and at the end of July 1931 and following the Chess Olympiad in Prague this committee commissioned Hans Kmoch to conduct the negotiations with the competitors for a double round tournament to be held at Lake Bled.

    Most of those players approached gave their agreement but Max Euwe declined because of work commitments, Mir Sultan Khan was due to play in the British Championships and Akiba Rubinstein asked for a printed programme. This was sent to him and he was given until August 16th to either confirm or decline the invitation but when this deadline expired without any reply his place was offered to Gosta Stoltz. Stoltz immediately cabled his acceptance but later that day a cable confirming his acceptance arrived from Rubinstein. The tournament committee ruled that the offer to Stoltz should stand and thus Rubinstein was forced to bow out.

    The final list of fourteen players included not only Stoltz but also the World Champion Alexander Alekhine, Lajos Asztalos, Efim Bogoljubov, Milan Vidmar, Isaac Kashdan, Borislav Kostic, Geza Maroczy, Edgar Colle, Aron Nimzowitsch, Vasja Pirc, Savielly Tartakower, Salomon Flohr and Rudolf Spielmann.

    The players stayed at the Hotel Toplice and it was here that most of the tournament except Round 19 ( held in Ljubljana ) took place. The first round was held in a large hall but the spectators made such a noise and disturbance that all the subsequent rounds were played in a smaller room in a much more controlled atmosphere which overlooked Lake Bled. The tournament opened on the 22nd of August with the opening banquet and the drawing of lots and ran until the 29th of September 1931.

    The rate of play was 35 moves in 2 hours. Play commenced daily at 9:00am until 2:00pm and then there was a break for a meal. After this at 4:30pm play was resumed for another two hours with a control rate of 15 moves per hour.

    Alyekhin registered one of his greatest triumphs by out distancing the rest of the field by a whopping 5 points.

    Crosstable :

    table[
    Pts 1.Alyekhin ** 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 11 11 11 20 2.Bogolyubov 0 ** 0 0 11 11 1 10 01 0 00 11 1 11 15 3.Niemzowitsch 00 1 ** 1 00 11 0 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.Vidmar 0 1 0 ** 0 11 0 1 1 13 5.Kashdan 00 11 ** 0 1 00 10 1 10 11 13 6.Flohr 0 00 00 1 1 ** 0 1 1 1 11 0 1 13 7.Stoltz 00 0 1 0 1 ** 11 1 1 00 01 1 13 8.Tartakover 0 01 11 0 00 ** 0 11 1 13 9.Kostic 0 10 00 01 0 1 ** 0 01 1 11 12 10.Spielmann 1 0 1 0 0 0 ** 01 00 1 11 12 11.Maroczy 00 11 0 01 00 0 1 10 ** 1 12 12.Colle 00 00 0 0 00 1 11 00 10 11 0 ** 0 11 10 13.Asztalos 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 1 ** 00 9 14.Pirc 00 00 1 0 0 00 00 00 11 ** 8 ]table

    Allocation Of Prizes :

    1st Alyekhin 30,000 dinars

    2nd Bogolyubov 20,000 dinars

    3rd Niemzowitsch 15,000 dinars

    =4th Vidmar 7,500 dinars

    =4th Kashdan 7,500 dinars

    =4th Flohr 7,500 dinars

    =4th Stoltz 7,500 dinars

    The seven non-prizewinners received 250 dinars for each point scored.

    182 games, 1931

  13. Boris Spassky's 400 Selected Games
    Almost completed. 52?
    399 games, 1948-2002

  14. Botvinnik Victories w/ the French playing Black
    17 games, 1935-1955

  15. Brutal Attacking Chess
    All opening traps,mating themes,and tactics that every chess player should know. All Classic Games you need to know.Attacking 0-0.Double Bishop Attacks.I wish I could have reviewed the games in this collection when I first learned chess at age 14.My hope is this will help someone who is just learning the game and those of us who keep falling for opening traps.
    400 games, 1619-2007

  16. Bugojno 1978
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Bugojno (1978)

    The small town of Bugojno in central Yugoslavia ( now Bosnia ) hosted five strong tournaments between 1978 and 1986. ( See Game Collection: Bugojno 1980 , Game Collection: Bugojno 1982 , Game Collection: Bugojno 1984 and Game Collection: Bugojno 1986 for the others ). However, this tournament was the first one. It was a category 14 event that featured players of the old guard like Gligoric, Ivkov and Byrne and pitted them against a younger generation that included Timman, Miles and Huebner. The tournament ran from the 26th of February to the 16th of March and in the sixteen player field Karpov and Spassky emerged as the joint winners. For Spassky it was a victory to rank alongside wins such as the 29th USSR Championship in 1961, the Zonal Tournament of Seven in Moscow 1964 and the 1966 Piatigorsky Cup. For Karpov it was an excellent dress rehearsal in his only other showing in 1978 before facing Korchnoi to defend the World Title in September.

    table[
    Pts 1. Karpov ( 2725 ) * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 2. Spassky ( 2630 ) * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 3. Timman ( 2585 ) 1 * 0 1 1 0 1 1 9 4. Ljubojevic ( 2605 ) 0 1 * 1 0 0 1 1 1 8 5. Tal ( 2625 ) * 1 1 8 6. Hort ( 2620 ) 0 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 8 7. Larsen ( 2620 ) 0 0 1 0 1 * 1 1 1 0 8 8. Balashov ( 2590 ) 0 0 * 1 1 7 9. Huebner ( 2595 ) 0 1 0 * 1 0 1 7 10. Miles ( 2565 ) 0 0 1 0 0 * 1 1 7 11. Ivkov ( 2515 ) 1 0 * 0 0 6 12. Portisch ( 2630 ) 0 0 0 0 * 1 1 6 13. Byrne ( 2550 ) 0 0 0 0 * 1 6 14. Vukic ( 2480 ) 0 0 1 0 0 * 6 15. Bukic ( 2500 ) 0 0 0 0 1 0 * 5 16. Gligoric ( 2565 ) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 * 5 ]table


    120 games, 1978

  17. C18 French: Winawer [Black]
    French Defense [Winawer: Advance Variation]
    49 games, 2008-2013

  18. Cambridge Springs 1904
    In the Spring of 1904, American and European chess masters gathered at Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania to compete in a large round robin tournament. Among the competitors were seven of the top ten players of the world, as well as the World Champion and the various national champions of Russia, France, Austria, and the United States. The participants were Emanuel Lasker, Mikhail Chigorin, David Janowski, Harry Nelson Pillsbury, Carl Schlechter, Frank James Marshall, Georg Marco, Jacques Mieses, Richard Teichmann, Jackson Showalter, William Napier, Albert Hodges, Eugene Delmar, Albert Fox, John Finan Barry, and Thomas Francis Lawrence. 27 year old Frank Marshall stunned the chess world with his phenomenal victory of 13/15 over the chess elite, including wins against Janowski, Schlechter, and Pillsbury (two of which were brilliancy prizes). Marshall's win marked the beginning of a career that would include going on to be US Champion for 27 years and a challenger for the world championship against Lasker in 1907.

    The final standings and crosstable:

    1st Marshall 13/15 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

    =2nd Janowski 11/15 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

    =2nd Lasker 11/15 1 * 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

    4th Marco 9/15 * 1 0 1 0 1 1 1

    5th Showalter 8/15 0 * 1 1 1 0 1

    =6th Schlechter 7/15 0 0 1 * 0 0 1 1 1

    =6th Chigorin 7/15 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 0 1 1 1 0 1

    =8th Mieses 7/15 0 0 0 1 0 0 * 1 1 1 0 1 1 0

    =8th Pillsbury 7/15 0 0 1 0 0 * 1 0 1 1

    =10th Fox 6/15 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 * 1 1 0 1 0 0

    =10th Teichmann 6/15 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 * 1 0 1 1

    =12th Lawrence 5/15 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 * 1 0

    =12th Napier 5/15 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 * 1 1

    =14th Barry 5/15 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 * 0 1

    =14th Hodges 5/15 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 * 0

    16th Delmar 4/15 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 *

    This collection would not have been possible without: http://cs1904.com/

    120 games, 1904

  19. Complex games
    Games of my interest, collected in no particular orther.
    222 games, 1839-2009

  20. Dallas, 1957
    56 games, 1957

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