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JoseTigranTalFischer
Chess Game Collections
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  1. French Defense
    Petrosian played it, Morozevich plays it. Good enough reason for you and I both to become well versed in the black side of the French.

    The question is whether to delve into the classical defense which occurs after 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 (Morozevich's preference) or the winawer which occurs after 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 (Petrosian's preference). Then there's also the question of how to deal with the tarrasch variation -- when white plays an early Nd2 rather than Nc3. I'll give you the information necessary to make your choice.

    The choice you make ultimately depends on what type of game you'd like to see develop. If you follow in the footsteps of Petrosian, you'll have more positional struggles, while Morozevich's french ideas will give you and your opponent chaos to sort out. Either way you'll find yourself never at a loss for ideas in the french defense.

    74 games, 1909-2009

  2. FRENCH DEFENSE MASTERPIECES
    21 games, 1936-2013

  3. French Defense: MacCutcheon Variation
    The MacCutcheon Variation of the Classical French Defense (C12). Also known as the McCutcheon Variation.

    Encyclopedia of Chess Openings Nomenclature:

    C12(a) French: MacCutcheon Variation
    1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Bb4

    C12b French: MacCutcheon, Wolf Gambit: 5.Nge2

    C12c French: MacCutcheon (minor 5.Bd3 line): 5.Bd3

    C12d French: MacCutcheon, Exchange Variation (non-Bogoljubov): 5.exd5

    C12e French: MacCutcheon, Bogoljubov Variation: 5.exd5 Qxd5 [6.Bxf6 gxf6 7.Qd2 Qa5]

    C12f French: MacCutcheon, Advance Variation (non-5. ...h6 lines): 5.e5

    C12g French: MacCutcheon, Advance Variation (minor 5. ...h6 lines): 5.e5 h6

    C12h French: MacCutcheon, Chigorin Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.exf6

    C12i French: MacCutcheon, Grigoriev Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.exf6 hxg5 7.fxg7 Rg8 8.h4 gxh4 9.Qg4

    C12j French: MacCutcheon, Bernstein Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bh4

    C12k French: MacCutcheon, Janowski Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Be3

    C12l French: MacCutcheon, Olland Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bc1

    C12m French: MacCutcheon, Tartakower Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bd2 Nfd7

    C12n French: MacCutcheon, Lasker Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bd2 Bxc3

    C12o French: MacCutcheon, Duras Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bd2 Bxc3 7.bxc3 Ne4 8.Qg4 Kf8 9.Bc1

    C12p French: MacCutcheon, Extended Lasker Variation: 5.e5 h6 6.Bd2 Bxc3 7.bxc3 Ne4 8.Qg4 g6

    33 games, 1885-2008

  4. FRENCH TARRASCH
    Opening of the Day OPOD Mo 16/04/2007
    French, Tarrasch (C06)

    http://www.playchess.de/tournaments...
    http://www.playchess.de/tournaments...
    http://www.playchess.de/tournaments...
    http://www.playchess.de/tournaments...

    73 games, 1923-2007

  5. Groningen 1946
    Well, I noticed that there wasn't a collection for this event, so I'm going to try and create one. Thanks to suenteus po 147 and nescio for round-by-round pairings and whiteshark for the following picture: http://www.rogerpaige.me.uk/histori... Games M Christoffel vs O Bernstein, 1946, from the second round, and Denker vs O Bernstein, 1946 from the tenth round are missing from the collection.

    Crosstable (Many thanks to suenteus po 147):

    Botvinnik * ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.5

    2 Euwe ½ * 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14.0

    3 Smyslov 0 1 * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 12.5

    4 Najdorf 1 ½ ½ * 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 11.5

    5 Szabo 0 0 ½ 0 * 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 11.5

    6 Boleslavskij 0 0 0 0 0 * ½ 1 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 11.0

    7 Flohr ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 11.0

    8 Lundin 0 ½ ½ 1 1 0 ½ * ½ 0 ½ 1 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 10.5

    9 Stolz 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 10.5

    10 Denker ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 0 * 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 9.5

    11 Kotov 1 1 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 0 9.5

    12 Tartakower 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 9.5

    13 Kottnauer 0 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 0 * 1 1 0 ½ ½ 0 1 9.0

    14 Yanofsky 1 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 8.5

    15 Bernstein 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 0 7.0

    16 Guimard 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 7.0

    17 Vidmar 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 0 6.5

    18 Steiner 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ 6.0

    19 O'Kelly 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 5.5

    20 Christoffel 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 * 5.0

    188 games, 1946

  6. h-file Attacks, some Greek Gifts by Fredthebear
    Fredthebear collected these games featuring kingside flank attacks using pawn levers, piece sacrifices, protruding long range batteries, and outposts invading upon the third/sixth rank. Attacks along the h-file are quite common, especially after castling kingside. The king's knight should be appreciated for the vital role it plays! Going through these games will improve your opening and middlegame attacking and checkmating skills, as the majority of games are under forty moves. Conversely, the defense of your own castled king will improve as you better recognize threats to your own kingdom.

    The file is full but still needs more editing.

    494 games, 1560-2016

  7. Hastings 1895
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Hastings (1895)

    The chess club of the English coastal town of Hastings was founded in 1882. In 1895 the club organized a tournament that was the strongest ever held up to that time. Taking place over the month of August all the leading players of the day participated. Among the participants were the veterans Blackburne and Bird and the young masters Janowski, Schlechter, Teichmann and Walbrodt. The favourites were Lasker, Steinitz, Tarrasch and Chigorin. However, the winner turned out to be the then relatively unknown American Harry Nelson Pillsbury who was playing in his first major tournament. The tournament was memorable for a number of masterpieces created and a very exciting finish with the lead changing hands in the last three rounds.

    -

    A very special thanks to <Calli> and <keypusher> for the link to this article that has an interview with the tournament winner : https://picasaweb.google.com/Caissa... Click on the magnifying glass to read it.

    -

    At a banquet Chigorin announced that the top prizewinners had been invited to St. Petersburg for a match-tournament to begin later in December that year. ( See <keypusher>'s Game Collection: St. Petersburg 1895-96 for that event ).

    _

    The Final Standings were :

    1st Pillsbury 16½ points (+15, =3, -3);

    2nd Chigorin 16 points (+14, =4, -3);

    3rd Lasker 15½ points (+14, =3, -4);

    4th Tarrasch 14 points (+12, =4, -5);

    5th Steinitz 13 points (+11, =4, -6);

    6th Schiffers 12 points (+9, =6, -6);

    =7th von Bardeleben 11½ points (+8, =7, -6);

    =7th Teichmann 11½ points (+8, =7, -6);

    9th Schlechter 11 points (+5, =12, -4);

    10th Blackburne 10½ points (+9, =3, -9);

    11th Walbrodt 10 points (+6, =8, -7);

    =12th Burn 9½ points (+8, =3, -10);

    =12th Janowski 9½ points (+7, =5, -9);

    =12th Mason 9½ points (+7, =5, -9);

    =15th Bird 9 points (+4, =10, -7);

    =15th Gunsberg 9 points (+7, =4, -10);

    =17th Albin 8½ points (+5, =7, -9);

    =17th Marco 8½ points (+5, =7, -9);

    19th Pollock 8 points (+6, =4, -11);

    =20th Mieses 7½ points (+4, =7, -10);

    =20th Tinsley 7½ points (+7, =1, -13);

    22nd Vergani 3 points (+2, =2, -17).

    -

    table[
    1. Pillsbury * 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 2. Chigorin 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 3. Lasker 1 0 * 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 4. Tarrasch 0 0 1 * 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 5. Steinitz 0 1 0 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 6. Schiffers 0 1 0 0 0 * ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 7. von Bardeleben 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ * ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 8. Teichmann 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 9. Schlechter 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 10. Blackburne ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 ½ * 0 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 11. Walbrodt ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½ 1 * 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 12. Burn 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 0 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 13. Janowski 0 1 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 0 * ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 14. Mason 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ * 1 0 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 15. Bird 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 16. Gunsberg 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 * 1 ½ 0 1 0 0 17. Albin 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 * 0 0 1 1 ½ 18. Marco ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * 1 1 0 ½ 19. Pollock 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 1 1 0 * 0 0 1 20. Mieses 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 * 1 1 21. Tinsley 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 1 0 * 1 22. Vergani 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 0 *]table

    -

    231 games, 1895

  8. Instructional Remedies Vs. French Defense
    77 games, 1908-1971

  9. Interzonal 1970 (Palma de Mallorca)
    The 1970 Interzonal was held in Palma de Mallorca from November 9-December 12 1970, and was the last Interzonal held as a one-section round robin. With the tournament swelling to 24 players and further expansion on the way, future changes were inevitable. These were the players who fought it out, the usual mixture of super grandmasters, strong players not quite at their peak in either direction, and total outsiders.

    William G Addison, Miroslav Filip, Robert James Fischer, Efim Geller, Svetozar Gligoric, Vlastimil Hort, Robert Huebner, Borislav Ivkov, Eleazar Jimenez Zerquera, Bent Larsen, Milan Matulovic, Henrique Mecking, Dragoljub Minic, Renato Naranja, Oscar Panno, Lev Polugaevsky, Lajos Portisch, Samuel Reshevsky, Jorge Alberto Rubinetti, Vasily Smyslov, Duncan Suttles, Mark Taimanov, Wolfgang Uhlmann, Tudev Ujtumen

    Ujtumen from Mongolia, about as outside as an outsider could get, actually held the lead by himself after round 3. However, reality and Robert J. Fischer set in, as the American quickly soared to a dominating position. The other contenders didn't worry about it too much; after all, you only had to finish in the top six to qualify for the Candidates, and there was even a seventh spot open for a reserve. So they played it safe, while Fischer kept working hard.

    At the quarter pole following round 6, Fischer had 5.5 points and a 1.5 point lead on Geller, Gligoric, Larson, Panno, and Ujtumen. But then came a bad stretch: he managed to draw lost positions in round 7 and 8, but Larsen didn't let him off the hook in round 9. By now the lead had vanished, as Geller joined Fischer at the top with 6.5.

    That led to the critical round 12 encounter between the leaders, Geller holding a half-point lead and playing the White pieces. Any normal grandmaster, when Geller offered an early draw, would have accepted to get an easy half-point closer to qualification. Fischer, hungry for a win after five rounds without one, refused angrily.

    Geller played inaccurately and lost a pawn, but got into a difficult rook ending. Eventually, a hallucination and a final mistake sealed his fate, and Fischer took the lead. The rest was a matter of technique: Fischer won two more in a row, took a couple of draws for a breather, then started his famous streak with full points in his last seven games.

    There was plenty of action for the other qualifying spots, though. When Fischer began his streak in round 17, he had 11.5 points to Geller's 11.0 while Uhlmann had 10.5, and Taimanov 10.0. Trailing were were Gligoric, Huebner, Larsen, and Polugaevsky with 9.5, plus Mecking, Panno and Polugaevsky with 9.0.

    Geller played solidly the rest of the way, making sure of qualifying without trouble. Uhlmann and Taimanov both faded a bit (and played Fischer along the way), while Larsen and Huebner went on winning streaks and Smyslov came out of nowhere back into contention. Going into what became a controversial last round, these were the standings:

    <17.5>: Fischer

    <15.0>: Huebner

    <14.5>: Geller

    <14.0>: Larsen

    <13.0>: Taimanov, Uhlmann

    <12.5>: Gligoric, Panno, Polugaevsky, Portisch, Smyslov

    <12.0>: Mecking

    Remember, the top six qualify for the Candidates, with a seventh spot available for a reserve (and with the unpredictable Fischer in the mix, that could well become valuable). Fischer, Huebner, Geller and Larsen were sure qualifiers. Taimanov and Uhlmann could be sure of qualifying with a win, but should either fail any of the 12.5s could find leap ahead and even Mecking had a theoretical chance.

    Uhlmann had white against an outsider in Naranja, and got his point without too much trouble. Taimanov had the theoretically tougher game, but the kibitzing Taimanov vs Matulovic, 1970 discusses the rumors that Matulovic's pocketbook was on steroids. That still left the reserve spot, with Portisch and Smyslov winning their games while Gligoric and Polugaevsky drew and Panno was scheduled to play Black against Fischer.

    But Panno refused to play. The games of the last round were scheduled for 4:00 PM Saturday, but Fischer and Reshevsky were allowed to start at 7:00 PM for religious reasons. Panno felt this was particularly unfair in the last round, because some players might have an advantage from knowing the results of earlier games.

    This was a particularly selfless protest, since Panno himself was the only player who could have benefitted from that information. However, he stuck to his guns even after Fischer urged him to play, and did no more than actually come to the board and resign in person rather than forfeit. For more discussion, see the kibitizing to Fischer vs Panno, 1970.

    The only unfinished business was a playoff match betweeen Portisch and Smyslov for the reserve spot played in Portoroz in 1971. This was drawn, and Portisch was awarded the consolation prize due to better tiebreaks from the tournament.

    1 Fischer 18.5/23 * 0 1 = 1 1 = 1 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 = 1 1 = = 1 =

    2 Larsen 15.0/23 1 * = = 0 1 = = = = 1 1 0 = = 1 = 1 = 1 1 = 1 =

    3 Geller 15.0/23 0 = * 1 = 1 = 1 = = = 1 = = 1 = 1 = = = 1 1 = =

    4 Huebner 15.0/23 = = 0 * = 1 = 0 = = 0 = = 1 = 1 1 1 1 = 1 1 1 1

    5 Taimanov 14.0/23 0 1 = = * = = = = = = 0 = 0 1 1 = 1 = 1 = 1 1 1

    6 Uhlmann 14.0/23 0 0 0 0 = * 1 = = 1 = = 1 = 0 1 = 1 1 = 1 1 1 1

    7 Portisch 13.5/23 = = = = = 0 * = 0 1 = 1 1 = = = 1 = = 1 = 1 1 0

    8 Smyslov 13.5/23 0 = 0 1 = = = * 1 = = 0 = = = = = = 1 1 = 1 1 1

    9 Polugaevsky 13.0/23 = = = = = = 1 0 * = 1 = = = = 1 0 = 1 1 = = = =

    10 Gligoric 13.0/23 0 = = = = 0 0 = = * 1 = 1 = 1 = = 1 0 = 1 = 1 1

    11 Panno 12.5/23 0 0 = 1 = = = = 0 0 * = = = 1 1 = = = = 1 1 = 1

    12 Mecking 12.5/23 0 0 0 = 1 = 0 1 = = = * 1 = = = = 0 = = 1 1 1 1

    13 Hort 11.5/23 0 1 = = = 0 0 = = 0 = 0 * 1 = 1 = = = = 1 = 1 =

    14 Ivkov 10.5/23 0 = = 0 1 = = = = = = = 0 * = = 0 = = = = 1 = =

    15 Suttles 10.0/23 0 = 0 = 0 1 = = = 0 0 = = = * 0 = = 1 = 0 1 = 1

    16 Minic 10.0/23 0 0 = 0 0 0 = = 0 = 0 = 0 = 1 * 1 = = = 1 = 1 1

    17 Reshevsky 9.5/23 0 = 0 0 = = 0 = 1 = = = = 1 = 0 * = = = 0 0 = 1

    18 Matulovic 9.0/23 = 0 = 0 0 0 = = = 0 = 1 = = = = = * = = 0 0 = 1

    19 Addison 9.0/23 0 = = 0 = 0 = 0 0 1 = = = = 0 = = = * = 0 0 1 1

    20 Filip 8.5/23 0 0 = = 0 = 0 0 0 = = = = = = = = = = * = 1 = 0

    21 Naranja 8.5/23 = 0 0 0 = 0 = = = 0 0 0 0 = 1 0 1 1 1 = * 0 0 1

    22 Ujtumen 8.5/23 = = 0 0 0 0 0 0 = = 0 0 = 0 0 = 1 1 1 0 1 * 1 =

    23 Rubinetti 6.0/23 0 0 = 0 0 0 0 0 = 0 = 0 0 = = 0 = = 0 = 1 0 * 1

    24 Jimenez-Zerquera 5.5/23 = = = 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 0 0 = = 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 *

    276 games, 1970

  10. Interzonals 1962: Stockholm
    The 1962 Interzonal tournament in Stockholm was a 23-player round robin, with six players qualifying for the Candidates tournament. The winner was Fischer with 17.5/22 (+13 =9 -0),joint-second with 15 were Geller and Petrosian,and joint-fourth with 14 were Filip and Korchnoi. But there was a three-way tie for sixth place between Benko,Gligoric and Stein, all with 13.5 points. They then played a double round-robin play-off tournament to decide sixth place.Stein won with 3/4, Benko had 2/3 and Gligoric 0/3. The final game between Benko and Gligoric was not played. Stein did not qualify due to a ruling limiting the number of players from one country participating in the Candidates tournament, so the last place went to Benko.
    258 games, 1962

  11. JoseTigranTalFischer's favorite games
    311 games, 1851-2017

  12. Karlsbad 1911
    The second international chess master tournament held in the health resort of Karlsbad (located in present day Czech Republic) was conducted from August 20th to September 24th, 1911. The opening ceremony was held in the Kurhaus. Twenty-six chess masters were invited to particpate in the enormous round robin tournament. Among the players were established masters such as Akiba Rubinstein, Carl Schlechter, and Frank James Marshall, as well as younger stars such as Alexander Alekhine, Aron Nimzowitsch, and George Rotlewi. As the tournament went on and the grueling schedule of games took its toll on the players, the expected names emerged as leaders with one noticeable addition: Richard Teichmann! From Teichmann's return to international play in 1902 (after having lost the use of his right eye to an infection) to 1910 he had drawn many games due to poor health, which earned him so many 5th place prizes that he was known as "Richard the Fifth." In 1911, however, Teichmann received a small inheritance from his mother that provided him more leisure time to focus during ongoing tournaments without having to work at the same time. This tournament proved to be Teichmann's greatest international achievement. He earned clear first against the massive field, including victories against shared seconds Rubinstein and Schlechter and fourth place Rotlewi.

    The final standings and crosstable:

    1st Teichmann 18/25 * 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1

    =2nd Rubinstein 17/25 0 * ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1

    =2nd Schlechter 17/25 0 ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1

    4th Rotlewi 16/25 0 ½ 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1

    =5th Marshall 15½/25 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 1 1

    =5th Nimzowitsch 15½/25 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1

    7th Vidmar 15/25 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ * 0 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1

    =8th Leonhardt 13½/25 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0

    =8th Tartakower 13½/25 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ * 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1

    =8th Duras 13½/25 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1

    =8th Alekhine 13½/25 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1

    12th Spielmann 13/25 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 * 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 0

    13th Perlis 12/25 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 * ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 1

    =14th Cohn 11½/25 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 0

    =14th Levenfish 11½/25 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ * 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 1 0

    =14th Süchting 11½/25 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1

    =17th Burn 11/25 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 * 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 0

    =17th Salwe 11/25 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 * 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½

    =19th Johner 10½/25 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0

    =19th Rabinovich 10½/25 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1

    =19th Kostic 10½/25 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 0 1

    22nd Dus Chotimirsky 10/25 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 ½ * 1 0 0 1

    =23rd Alapin 8½/25 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ 0

    =23rd Chajes 8½/25 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ * 0 1

    =23rd Fahrni 8½/25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 * 0

    =23rd Jaffe 8½/25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 *

    325 games, 1911

  13. Karlsbad 1929
    The fifth international master chess tournament to be held in the spa resort of Karlsbad, Czechoslovakia in 1929 was a round robin event involving 22 of the best chess masters in the world. Of the top players, only world champion Alexander Alekhine and former world champion Emanuel Lasker were missing. The line up of players included such names as Jose Capablanca, Efim Bogoljubov, Frank Marshall, Akiba Rubinstein, Milan Vidmar, Aron Nimzowitsch, and Rudolph Spielmann. Among the remaining invitations, one notable participant was Vera Menchik, the women's world champion, who joined despite the protests of some male colleagues, including fellow participant Albert Becker. The tournament was held in the Kurhaus Imperial Hotel from July 30th to August 28th. The time control used was 30 moves in two hours followed by 15 moves in one hour. Despite Spielmann's amazing beginning of 9 points earned in the first ten rounds followed by Capablanca's shared lead in the standings from the thirteenth round on, it was to be Nimzowitsch's "finest hour," with a win over Savielly Tartakower propelling him to first place and the grand prize of 20,000 Kronen. Although he used this victory to campaign for his right to challenge Alekhine for the world championship, losses to the world champion at San Remo in 1930 and Bled in 1931 would dash his chances of competing for the world crown. Nevertheless, this victory amongst such a field of chess masters would shine as the high point of Nimzowitsch's career.

    The final standings and crosstable:

    1st Nimzowitsch 15/21 * ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1

    =2nd Capablanca 14½/21 ½ * 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1

    =2nd Spielmann 14½/21 0 1 * 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1

    4th Rubinstein 13½/21 ½ ½ 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 1

    =5th Becker 12/21 ½ 0 ½ ½ * 1 1 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 0

    =5th Vidmar 12/21 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 1

    =5th Euwe 12/21 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1

    8th Bogoljubov 11½/21 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 1

    9th Grünfeld 11/21 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½

    =10th Canal 10½/21 ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ * 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 1

    =10th Mattison 10½/21 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1

    =12th Tartakower 10/21 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1

    =12th Maróczy 10/21 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 0 ½ * 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1

    =12th Colle 10/21 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 1 1 0 ½ 1 * 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 1 1

    =12th Treybal 10/21 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 0 * ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1

    =16th Sämisch 9½/21 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0

    =16th Yates 9½/21 1 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 1

    =18th Johner 9/21 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 * ½ 0 ½ 1

    =18th Marshall 9/21 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 1 1

    20th Gilg 8/21 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 * ½ ½

    21st Thomas 6/21 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ * 1

    22nd Menchik 3/21 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ 0 *

    *This collection would have been absolutely impossible without the continued and incredible effort of <sneaky pete>, to whom I owe a great debt.

    231 games, 1929

  14. Karpov - Book Games
    8 games, 1968-1972

  15. Kemeri 1937 International Tournament
    153 games, 1937

  16. KORCH 10
    21 games, 1922-1983

  17. KORCH 11
    4 games, 1977-2015

  18. KORCH 12
    6 games, 1920-2010

  19. KORCH 13
    1 game, 1924

  20. KORCH 14
    8 games, 1967-2015

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