chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
 
Karpova
Chess Game Collections
[what is this?] --*-- [what is this?]

<< previous | page 1 of 2 | next >>

  1. "Chess Genius Karpov" - Victor Baturinsky
    Victor Davidovich Baturinsky wrote this book in 1991 so it covers all of the World Championship matches between Anatoly Karpov and Garry Kasparov. The book contains many beautiful games by Tolya (but not only wins) and gives insight into the way he was working and his development. Tolya himself also contributed to the book, e. g. by annotating several games. There's also a part describing Karpov's secret correspondence with Robert James Fischer to arrange a match. There are also many pictures (b/w).

    There's an index on games, openings, a bibliography and an appendix with Karpov's tournament and match records (up to 1990, including a lot of crosstables).

    105 games, 1961-1990

  2. "Learn from the Legends" - Mihail Marin
    Marin, Mihail: "Learn from the Legends - Chess Champions at their Best", 2nd edition, Quality Chess, Gothenburg 2006

    An excellent book by GM Mihail Marin which won the ChessCafe.com Book of the Year award in 2005.

    The book consists of the following chapters:

    1. Akiba Rubinstein's Rook Endings

    2. Alexander Alekhine and the Fourth Phase of the Game

    3. In the Patriarch's Footsteps

    4. Tal's Super Rooks vs. Two Minor Pieces

    5. Petrosian's Exchange Sacrifices

    6. Bobby Fischer's Pet Bishop

    7. Karpov's Opposite Coloured Bishops Endings

    8. Viktor, the "Non-Existent" Hero

    There is also a bibliography, two forewords, short introductions to each chapter (about 1 page each), biographies of the chessplayers (about 1.5 pages each) and two indices (Index of complete games, Index of game fragments). The book has 331 pages and all the chapters together taking up 306 pages.

    I designate the games the following way:

    1. Information is the Chapter you find it in (e. g. C1 means "Chapter 1").

    2. Category (e. g. "Coverting a material advantage 1") - but I shortened the titles of the categories a bit.

    3. Complete game score ("C") or game fragment ("F") - since the book focuses on endgames most games are fragments (i. e. no opening or middlegame moves are given).

    79 games, 1906-2003

  3. Akiva's Spoiled Brilliancies
    2 games, 1903-1905

  4. Apocalypse now - Chess, Controversy and charges
    This is a collection presenting interesting controversies to you which were a part of chess and chessgames.com since their beginnings. I hope that you will enjoy those games and the comments even more!

    Just for your orientation: My ignore list is empty

    35 games, 1862-2009

  5. Bogoljubov-Rubinstein Match, Sweden 1920
    From January 8 to February 1, 1920 Akiba Rubinstein faced Efim Bogoljubov in a match which took place in Gothenburg and Stockholm, Sweden.

    The match consisted of twelve games and first, Rubinstein took the lead with two consecutive wins. But Bogoljubov, who was later to play two Worldchampionship matches, bounced back with two consecutive wins. The fifth game ended in a draw while in rounds 6 to 9 the player with the white pieces won his game. A draw in round 10 was followed by a decisive victory for Rubinstein in their 11th match game. After drawing the last game, Rubinstein won the match by the score of 6.5-5.5 (+5 -4 =3).

    The match score from Rubinstein's point of view: 1 - 1 - 0 - 0 - 1/2 - 1 - 0 - 1 - 0 - 1/2 - 1 - 1/2

    Source: Pages 336-343 in Donaldson, John & Minev, Nikolay: “The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein. Volume 1: Uncrowned King”, 2nd edition – revised and enlarged, Milford, Russell Enterprises 2006

    12 games, 1920

  6. Comeback - Recovery from lost positions
    2 games, 1909-2000

  7. David Janowsky's exchange sacrifices
    16 games, 1896-1916

  8. Frederick Dewhurst Yates - Remarkable games
    Frederick Yates is well known for several losses against strong opposition like Capablanca and Rubinstein, but he was able to produce masterpieces himself. This man fought until the end and he was familiar with wild sacrifices. These are his remarkable games!
    50 games, 1910-1932

  9. Germany vs Kramnik
    The, at that time reigning Worldchampion GM Vladimir Kramnik faced

    GM Christopher Lutz (2597)

    GM Klaus Bischoff (2561)

    GM Robert Huebner (2604)

    GM Rustem Khazitovich Dautov (2616)

    on 2004.01.29 at the Centro Dannemann, Brissago

    Each German GM had three hours, while GM Kramnik had four hours in which to contemplate his moves on all four boards

    4 games, 2004

  10. Gruenfeld - Becker, Vienna, 1922
    Prior to Bad Pistyan (1922), Ernst Gruenfeld played four serious games against Albert Becker to test opening systems.[(1)]

    The match took place in the German Chess Club in Vienna from 14 March 1922 to 19 March 1922 and ended drawn (+1 -1 =2).[(2)]

    Grünfeld was not successful with the Benoni Defense in game 2. In his annotations, Becker said that Grünfeld, apart from the unfavourable opening agreed upon before, had made no mistakes in that game. Grünfeld was more successful in game 4. That was the first time he played the Grünfeld Defense, which was later named after him for his contributions.

    table[
    1 2 3 4
    Grünfeld 1 0 = = 2.0
    Becker 0 1 = = 2.0
    ]table

    <Sources>

    [(1) Österreichische Schachrundschau, August 1922, issue 6/7, p. 47. Provided in "ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek" ]

    [(2) Österreichische Schachrundschau', August 1922, issue 67, pp. 49-53. Provided in "ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek" ]

    4 games, 1922

  11. Gruenfeld - Tartakower, Vienna, 1922
    On his returning from Bad Pistyan (1922), Ernst Gruenfeld announced that he would like to play a match. Savielly Tartakower was willing to contest a 6-games match immediately, for a 180,000 Kronen match purse.[(1)]

    The financing of the games was secured in a short time, thanks to the Austrian Chess Federation, the Landstrasser Chess Federation, the Chess division Hakoah, the German Chess Club, von Döry and Godai. Theodor Gerbec donated the brilliancy prize.[(1)]

    The match took place in Vienna from 25 June 1922 to 1 July 1922 and ended drawn (+1 -1 =4).[(1)]

    Games 1, 2, 4 and 5 were played in the German Chess Club in Vienna, Game 2 in the Chess Club Hakoah and Game 6 in the Landstrasser Chess Federation.[(2)]

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6
    Grünfeld 0 = = = 1 = 3.0
    Tartakower 1 = = = 0 = 3.0
    ]table

    <Sources>

    [(1) Alois Wotawa, Der Wettkampf Grünfeld - Dr. Tartakower, Österreichische Schachrundschau, July 1922, issue 5, pp. 33-34. Provided in "ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek" ]

    [(2) Österreichische Schachrundschau', July 1922, issue 5, pp. 34-42. Provided in "ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek" ]

    6 games, 1922

  12. Italian gems Part I
    Though I have no special relation to Italy, I think that italian chess doesn't get the recognition it deserves. There where many good players (I won't include Greco, etc. in here) like Monticelli, Sergio Mariotti, Tatai and Godena. These are beautiful and/or remarkable games which are not widely known nowadays. This part is from Dubois to Tatai
    101 games, 1845-1973

  13. Italian gems Part II
    From Stefano Tatai to recent chessplayers.
    Enjoy it!
    71 games, 1968-2005

  14. Lodz triangular tournament 1908
    Frank James Marshall came to Poland in the autumn of 1908. First, he played in this tournament (during September but maybe overlapping into August or October) and the Game Collection: Rubinstein - Marshall, Match (1908) afterwards.

    This tournament is important since all the participants - Frank James Marshall, Akiba Rubinstein and Georg Salwe - were of GM strength.

    The players took turns playing each other but it's not known when the games were played (i.e. if Marshall played Rubinstein first or Salwe or if Rubinstein faced Salwe first and then Marshall or Salwe Marshall, etc.). So I give the games in bulks.

    Final crosstable:

    1. Rubinstein 9.5/16 (+6 -3 =7)
    2. Marshall 8.0/16 (+4 -4 =8)
    3. Salwe 6.5/16 (+2 -5 =9)

    Rubinstein beat Marshall 4.5 - 3.5 (+3 -2 =3)
    Rubinstein beat Salwe 5-3 (+3 -1 =3)
    Marshall beat Salwe 4.5-3.5 (+2 -1 =5)

    Rubinstein received 400, Marshall 250 and Salwe 150 rubles.

    Index:

    1. Marshall-Salwe
    Please note that one drawn game is missing (apparently Marshall played 1.d4 and they agreed to a draw)

    2. Salwe-Rubinstein

    3. Marshall-Rubinstein

    Source: Pages 153-165 in Donaldson, John & Minev, Nikolay: “The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein. Volume 1: Uncrowned King”, 2nd edition – revised and enlarged, Milford, Russell Enterprises 2006

    23 games, 1908

  15. Lodz triple-round match tournament 1906
    The Lodz Chess Society organized this tournament and according to Grekov it took place immediately after the Chigorin - Salwe match (+7 -5 =3 in Chigorin's favor, March to April).

    The participants were:
    Mikhail Chigorin Alexander Flamberg Akiba Rubinstein Georg Salwe

    The Tournament consisted of three cycles after which everyone had played every other one time so one cycle equals three rounds. After three cycles all the players had faced each other three times.

    Standings after cycle 1:

    1. Rubinstein 2.0
    2-3. Salwe 1.5
    2-3. Flamberg 1.5
    4. Chigorin 1.0

    Standings after cycle 2:

    1. Rubinstein 4.0
    2. Chigorin 4.0
    3. Flamberg 2.5
    4. Salwe 1.5

    Final Standings:

    1. Rubinstein 6.5
    2. Chigorin 5.5
    3. Flamberg 3.5
    4. Salwe 2.5

    The Mini Matches:

    Rubinstein - Chigorin 2.0 - 1.0 (+2 -1 =0)
    Rubinstein - Flamberg 2.5 - 0.5 (+2 -0 =1)
    Rubinstein - Salwe 2.0 - 1.0 (+1 -0 =2)
    Chigorin - Flamberg 1.5 - 1.5 (+1 -1 =1)
    Chigorin - Salwe 3.0 - 0.0 (+3 -0 =0)
    Flamberg - Salwe 1.5 - 1.5 (+1 -1 =1)

    Source: Pages 51-57 in Donaldson, John & Minev, Nikolay: “The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein. Volume 1: Uncrowned King”, 2nd edition – revised and enlarged, Milford, Russell Enterprises 2006

    18 games, 1906

  16. Polgar - Spassky, Budapest, 1993
    Negotiations for a training match between Judit Polgar and Boris Spassky began in November 1992.[(1)]

    On November 18, Judit was informed that the match would start on January 31st, 1993. 12 games were to be played and split between Budapest, Hungary, and Sveti Stefan, Montenegro. The prize fund was to be $200,000 and the Fischer clock was to be used. The time control was 1 hour and 50 min, plus a 1 min increment per move, for the first 40 moves. Small changes were made later, with the number of games was reduced to 10, all of them to be played in Budapest.[(1)]

    Only on January 20 had it become certain that the match would indeed take place. Judit immediately asked Lev Polugaevsky to become her second. He accepted her proposal. Spassky's seconds were Aleksander S Nikitin and Yuri Balashov. During the opening ceremony at the Vakert Casino, Judit drew the number 13, so she got Black in the first game. The match took place in the ballroom of the Intercontinental Hotel, which hosted about 1000 visitors per day. A change was made for game 10, which took place in the Beke Hotel. The winner would receive $120,000 and the loser $80,000.[(1)][(2)]

    The match was being staged by Jezdimir Vasiljevic, who had financed Fischer - Spassky (1992), and was organized by Janos Kubat.[(4)]

    Schedule:

    Game 1: January 31st
    Game 2: February 1st
    Rest day on February 2nd
    Game 3: February 3rd
    Game 4: February 4th
    Rest days on February 5th and 6th
    Game 5: February 7th
    Game 6: February 9th
    Game 7: February 11th
    Game 8: February 12th
    Rest day on February 13th
    Game 9: February 14th
    Game 10: February 16th

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    J Polgar = 1 0 1 = = = 1 = 0 5.5
    Spassky = 0 1 0 = = = 0 = 1 4.5
    ]table

    Video provided by Judit Polgar: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmBI...

    <Sources>

    [(1) Judit Polgar, Judit Polgar Teaches Chess 2 - From GM to Top Ten, Quality Chess, 2013, pages 260 to 299. ]

    [(2) Press reports have mixed claims either supporting Judit's information, or reporting $110,000 for the winner and $90,000 for the loser, e. g. Tidskrift för Schack, 03/1993, http://www.schack.se/tfs/history/19... ]

    The dates of the rounds were deduced from (1) and the following, contemporaneous reports:

    [(3) Eva Kekes, Associated Press, 1993.01.30, http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1993/S... ]

    [(4) Alex Bandy, Associated Press, 1993.02.01, http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1993/P... ]

    [(5) Alex Bandy, The Daily Gazette, 1993.02.01, http://news.google.com/newspapers?n... ]

    [(6) Alex Bandy, Associated Press, 1993.02.04, http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1993/P... ]

    [(7) The New York Times, 1993.02.05, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/05/a... ]

    [(8) The New York Times, 1993.02.10, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/10/a... ]

    [(9) Neues Deutschland, 1993.02.11, http://www.neues-deutschland.de/art... ]

    [(10) The New York Times, 1993.02.12, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/12/a... ]

    [(11) The New York Times, 1993.02.13, 1993, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/13/a... ]

    [(12) Alex Bandy, Associated Press, 1993.02.14, http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1993/P... ]

    [(13) The New York Times, 1993.02.15, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/15/a... ]

    [(14) The New York Times, 1993.02.17, http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/17/a... ]

    10 games, 1993

  17. Rotlewi's Memorable Games
    32 games, 1909-1911

  18. Rubinstein - Marshall, Match (1908)
    Frank James Marshall visited Poland in the autumn of 1908 to play in a five-player tournament which never came to pass. Instead, he played at Game Collection: Lodz triangular tournament 1908 and contested a 8 games match against Akiba Rubinstein from October 25 to November 7* in Warsaw, Poland.

    The match was a tense struggle with Rubinstein playing excellently during the first half, securing a +2 lead. But Marshall played strongly in the second half. Still, he didn't manage to equal the score.

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    Rubinstein 1 0 1 1 = 0 = = 4.5
    Marshall 0 1 0 0 = 1 = = 3.5
    ]table
    [Rubinstein had White in the odd-numbered games.]

    [ Source: Pages 153 and 166-174 of J Donaldson & N Minev, The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein - Volume 1: Uncrowned King, 2nd edition, 2006, Russell Enterprises, Inc., Milford, CT, USA ]

    * [ The dates for rounds 3 to 8 are taken from pages 282-291 of the 1910 'Wiener Schachzeitung' which indeed says that game 6 was played on Nov 3, game 7 at Nov 7 and game 8 at Nov 5 though they may have switched the later dates. But no correction was to be found in the editions of 1911, 1912 and 1913. ]

    Addition: IM Nikolay N Minev published analysis of the games in this article: http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skitt...

    8 games, 1908

  19. Rubinstein - Mieses, Match 2 (1909)
    After St. Petersburg (1909), Akiba Rubinstein travelled first to Meran, Italy, to recreate and returned to Berlin, Germany, at the beginning of May to contest a match against Jacques Mieses [1] whom he had beaten decisively in Game Collection: Rubinstein vs. Mieses, Match 1 (1905).

    The 10 games match took place in various cities in Germany from May 12 to 27, 1909.

    The first 4 games were played in Berlin, the next 3 in Hannover and the last 3 games in Frankfurt (Main).*

    Mieses took revenge for 1905 by winning the first three games. But Rubinstein recovered from that disastrous start winning the next game. After a draw in round 5, Rubinstein won three consecutive games and, after another draw in round 9, the last game.

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    Rubinstein 0 0 0 1 = 1 1 1 = 1 6.0
    Mieses 1 1 1 0 = 0 0 0 = 0 4.0
    ]table
    [Rubinstein had White in the even-numbered games.]

    [Source: Pages 198-202 of J Donaldson & N Minev, The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein - Volume 1: Uncrowned King, 2nd edition, 2006, Russell Enterprises, Inc., Milford, CT, USA ]

    [1] [ Page 239 of the 1909 'Wiener Schachzeitung' ]

    * [ The 1909 'Wiener Schachzeitung' deviates in her report on pages 239-240 by stating that the first 6 games were played in Berlin, the 7th in Hanover (24th May) and the last three games (8th on May 26) in Frankfurt (Main). ]

    10 games, 1909

  20. Rubinstein vs. Mieses, Match 1 (1905)
    Akiba Rubinstein, who had just become a Master at the Barmen [[Hauptturnier]] in August and Jacques Mieses met in Lodz, Poland, at the end of October, 1905, to contest a 3 games match.

    Akiva Rubinstein won all three games, but only the first two games have been preserved.

    table[
    1 2 3
    Rubinstein 1 1 1 3.0
    Mieses 0 0 0 0.0
    ]table
    [Rubinstein had White in the odd-numbered games.]

    Four years later, these two players contested a 2nd Match ().

    [ Source: Pages 41-42 of J Donaldson & N Minev, The Life & Games of Akiva Rubinstein - Volume 1: Uncrowned King, 2nd edition, 2006, Russell Enterprises, Inc., Milford, CT, USA ]

    2 games, 1905

<< previous | page 1 of 2 | next >>

SEARCH ENTIRE GAME COLLECTION DATABASE
use these two forms to locate other game collections in the database

Search by Keyword:

EXAMPLE: Search for "OPENING TRAPS" or "TAL".
Search by Username:


NOTE: You must type their screen-name exactly.


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC