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  1. *Bauang 1973
    This event was played right after Manila (1973). It was sponsored by Marlboro and became known as the [[1st Marlboro Chess Classic]].

    Nalinac Beach Resort, Bauang (La Union), 9-20 Nov. 1973

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
    1 Kavalek * ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 7˝
    =2 Ivkov ˝ * 1 ˝ 0 1 1 ˝ 1 1 6˝
    =2 Quinteros 0 0 * ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 6˝
    4 Larsen ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 6
    5 Tatai 0 1 0 ˝ * 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 1 3˝
    =6 Cardoso 0 0 0 1 1 * 0 ˝ ˝ 0 3
    =6 Torre ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 1 * ˝ ˝ 0 3
    =6 Estimo 0 ˝ 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 3
    =6 Ardiansyah 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 * ˝ 3
    =6 Naranja 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ˝ ˝ * 3 ]table

    A round by round table can be found at http://www.torneionline.com/loto/lo...

    [ Original collection: Game Collection: *Bauang 1973 by User: Tabanus. ]

    45 games, 1973

  2. *Portoroz Candidates Reserve Playoff 1971
    Missing the most, incl. dates

    shared 7th place at the Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970)

    Tidskrift för Schack, May 1971, p. 107 (http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo...)

    Smyslov in Jaque, 1 July 1971, pp. 24-25 (http://www.bartelski.pl/olimpbase/l...).

    <Portoroz, Yugoslavia (Slovenia), 30 May - 8 April 1971> (dates from Chess-Results)

    table[
    Portisch ˝ 1 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 3
    Smyslov ˝ 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 3 ]table

    Portisch 1st reserve because of more tiebreak points in the interzonal (TfS)

    6 games, 1971

  3. Amsterdam Candidates 1956
    Ten players competed to select a challenger to the world title. As the loser of the Botvinnik - Smyslov World Championship Match (1954), Smyslov was seeded directly into the tournament while the other nine were qualified from the Gothenburg Interzonal (1955).

    The opening ceremony took place on 26 March in Vossius Gymnasium, Amsterdam where the chairman of the Dutch Chess Federation Hendrik Jan van Steenis and FIDE President Folke Rogard held opening speeches. The tournament was then formally opened by Vice Mayor de Roos, and the chairman of the [[Stichting Internationale Schaaktraditie Amsterdam]] Evert Straat thanked all the sponsors. Whereafter the former (1935-1937) World Champion Max Euwe presented the tournament program and performed the drawing of lots. Play started at 5:30 pm the next day in Minerva-paviljoen, Amsterdam - the main venue, and lasted for five weeks and 18 rounds, when all the players had met each other twice (once with the white and once with the black pieces). Rounds 10 and 11 were played in Leeuwarden, where the players stayed in Hotel Lauswolt for five days (12-17 April).

    As in the Zurich Candidates (1953) tournament, Smyslov won. Smyslov went on to win the Botvinnik - Smyslov World Championship Match (1957) and become the 7th World Champion. He then lost the Smyslov - Botvinnik World Championship Rematch (1958). The next qualifier cycle was the Portoroz Interzonal (1958) and the Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959).

    Minerva-paviljoen, Amsterdam (rounds 1-9 and 12-18) and De Beurs, Leeuwarden (rounds 10-11), 27 March - 30 April 1956, final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Pts CHF* 1 Smyslov ** ˝˝ ˝˝ 0˝ ˝˝ ˝1 11 ˝1 1˝ ˝1 11˝ 5000 2 Keres ˝˝ ** ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝1 ˝˝ ˝0 1˝ 1˝ 10 3500 =3 Szabó ˝˝ ˝˝ ** 1˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝1 0˝ ˝˝ 01 9˝ 1310 =3 Spassky 1˝ ˝˝ 0˝ ** ˝˝ ˝1 0˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝1 9˝ 1310 =3 Petrosian ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ** 0˝ 01 1˝ ˝˝ 1˝ 9˝ 1310 =3 Bronstein ˝0 ˝0 ˝˝ ˝0 1˝ ** ˝1 1˝ ˝˝ ˝1 9˝ 1310 =3 Geller 00 ˝˝ ˝0 1˝ 10 ˝0 ** 11 ˝1 1˝ 9˝ 1310 =8 Filip ˝0 ˝1 1˝ ˝˝ 0˝ 0˝ 00 ** 10 ˝1 8 650 =8 Panno 0˝ 0˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝˝ ˝0 01 ** 1˝ 8 650 10 Pilnik ˝0 0˝ 10 ˝0 0˝ ˝0 0˝ 0˝ 0˝ ** 5 500 ]table

    Tournament leader: Max Euwe, assisted by Haije Kramer and Wolfgang Heidenfeld.

    Tournament books: [[Das Kandidatenturnier für die Weltmeisterschaft 1956]] by Max Euwe and Willem Jan Muhring (ten Have, Amsterdam 1956. 186 + 5 pp. Reprint 1980: Variant, Nederhorst den Berg); [[World Championship Candidates' Tournament: Holland 1956]] by Baruch Harold Wood (Chess, Sutton Coldfield 1956. 156 pp. Reprint 2003: Hardinge Simpole Ltd.).

    Daily reports in [[Utrechts Nieuwsblad]] are available at http://www.hetutrechtsarchief.nl/co.... Dates are from [[De Telegraaf]] which is also available at http://resources2.kb.nl/110585000/p... (get day by changing the last digit in the URL). [[The New York Times]] had daily reports except rounds 10 and 11.

    Pictures of six of the players: http://www.anp-archief.nl/page/2385...

    [Original collections: Game Collection: WCC Index (Candidates Tournament, 1956) by User: Resignation Trap and Game Collection: Amsterdam Candidates 1956 by User: Tabanus. Thanks to User: Benzol, User: Chessical, User: Phony Benoni and User: Stonehenge for help with sources. ] *[Prizes in CHF or Swiss franc, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_.... ]

    90 games, 1956

  4. Amsterdam Interzonal Playoff 1964
    Six players from the Amsterdam Interzonal (1964) would qualify for the Candidates matches in 1965. Portisch and Reshevsky had shared eight place, but since Soviet (and any country) by a FIDE ruling could advance only three players from the interzonal, a playoff for the sixth spot was needed.[1] This took place in Amsterdam right after the Interzonal tournament. The winner was best of four games[2] or the first to get 2,5 points.

    Pictures: http://fast.mediamatic.nl/f/tqgr/im... and http://fast.mediamatic.nl/f/tqgr/im...

    In the absence of Robert James Fischer (who had refused to play in the Interzonal), Reshevsky, the doyen of American chess, had been lured out of an 11-year boycott of the Interzonal tournaments.[3] American hopes were revived, for he had never been beaten in match play. Then for the first time in his 44-year chess career, he lost such a match.[3]

    <Amsterdam 25-29 June 1964>

    table[
    1 2 3
    1 GM Portisch 1 ˝ 1 2˝
    2 GM Reshevsky 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ]table

    Portisch advanced to the Tal - Portisch Candidates Quarterfinal (1965).

    [1)] [The Times 22 June 1964 p. 9. ] [2)] [The Times 23 June 1964 p. 10. ] [3)] [Larry Melvyn Evans in Sports Illustrated 20 July 1964 p. 45. ]

    [Original game collections: Game Collection: 0 by User: TheFocus and Game Collection: Amsterdam Interzonal Playoff 1964 by User: Tabanus. Dates are from the Dutch newspapers at http://kranten.delpher.nl/. ]

    3 games, 1964

  5. Berne 1932
    Together with London (1932) this was the strongest chess tournament in 1932, since it included five of the top 10 players* in the world. At the same time, 10 Swiss players competed for the [[36th Swiss Championship]]. Play was governed by a time limit of 40 moves in two and a half hours and, during the 2nd session, at the rate of 25 moves in one and a half hours. To avoid that the Swiss players staked their jobs, there were no rest days or extra days for adjourned games.

    The World Champion won again, but lost a game this time to Bogoljubov in the 10th round. The other favorites also met expectation, and were joined by the almost inactive 49-years-old Bernstein. Of the Swiss players, the Johner brothers did it best with 7 points. Hans Johner won the Swiss championship based on Sonneborn-Berger score.

    Picture of participants: http://www.rogerpaige.webspace.virg...

    Hotel Gurtenkulm (1st week) and Kasino (2nd week), Bern 16-30 July 1932, final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts Prizes 1 Alekhine * ˝ 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 12˝ 1200 =2 Euwe ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 11˝ 800 =2 Flohr 0 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11˝ 800 4 Sultan Khan 0 ˝ ˝ * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 11 550 =5 Bogoljubov 1 0 ˝ 1 * ˝ 1 0 ˝ 0 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 10 350 =5 Bernstein 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 10 350 7 Johner, Hans 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 * ˝ 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 ˝ 7 150 8 Johner, Paul 0 ˝ 0 0 1 0 ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ 0 0 1 1 1 7 150 =9 Henneberger 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ * 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 0 1 1 6 60 =9 Naegeli ˝ 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 * 0 0 ˝ 1 1 1 6 60 =9 Rivier 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 * 1 1 0 ˝ 1 6 60 =9 Grob 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 * ˝ ˝ 1 1 6 60 13 Colin 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * 0 1 1 5˝ 60 14 Voellmy 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 1 0 1 ˝ 1 * ˝ 0 4˝ 60 15 Gygli ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ * ˝ 3˝ 60 16 Staehelin 0 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ * 2 60 ]table

    In addition to the main prizes, the players received 30 Swiss franc for each won game.

    A summary by Hans Kmoch in Wiener Schach-Zeitung vol. 10 nos. 15-16 (Aug. 1932) pp. 225-230 & 242-247 can be found online at http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a... (in German) (with wrong date for one game and wrong round for another). Tournament book: [[Turnierbuch des Internationalen Schachturniers Bern 16. bis 30. Juli 1932]] by Wilhelm Bonacker (S. J. Berthoud, Bern 1932, 183 pp. Reprint: Edition Olms, Zürich 1988). Pairings and round dates are from this book, which has all the games and also covers group A (won by Rudolf Pitschak), B (won by Ernst Strehle), C, D and E.

    [ Original collection: Game Collection: Berne 1932 by User: Tabanus. ] *[ http://chessmetrics.com/cm/cm2/Sing... ]

    120 games, 1932

  6. Biel Interzonal 1976
    As part of the cycle which ended up with the Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Match (1978), three players from this event would go to the Candidate matches (1977). Qualified from the zonal tournaments* were: Sosonko from Barcelona (1975), Sanguineti from Fortaleza (1975), Csom and Andersson from Pula (1975), Liberzon from Reykjavik (1975), Diaz and Castro from Santo Domingo (1975), Rogoff from the US Championship (1975), Matanovic from Vraca (1975), Gulko from Vilnius (1975) and Smejkal* from Arandjelovac (1976) (= 11 players). Portisch, Petrosian and Byrne were qualified from the Candidate matches 1974. FIDE also selected Larsen, Tal, Smyslov, Hübner, and Geller, and added Lombard from the host country to have 20 players.

    Kongresshaus/Palais de Congrčs# (Biel/Bienne), 11 July - 6 August 1976, final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Pts 1 Larsen * 0 1 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 12˝ =2 Petrosian 1 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 1 1 12 =2 Portisch 0 ˝ * 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 0 ˝ 1 0 1 12 =2 Tal ˝ ˝ 1 * 0 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 12 =5 Smyslov ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 * 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ 11˝ =5 Byrne 1 ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 11˝ =5 Hübner ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 11˝ 8 Andersson ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 10˝ =9 Csom ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 0 1 * ˝ 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 ˝ 10 =9 Geller ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 0 1 1 10 =9 Smejkal 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ * 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 10 12 Sosonko ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 1 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 9˝ =13 Liberzon 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 9 =13 Rogoff ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 * ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 9 =13 Gulko ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 1 1 1 9 16 Sanguineti 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 8˝ 17 Matanovic 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 8 18 Castro 0 1 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ * 1 ˝ 6 19 Lombard 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 * 1 5 20 Diaz 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 * 2˝]table

    Tournament leaders: Hans Suri and Hansjürg Leuzinger. Games started 5 pm.

    Larsen qualified directly, while Petrosian and Portisch qualified from the Varese Interzonal Playoff (1976). The three were joined by Henrique Mecking, Lev Polugaevsky, and Vlastimil Hort from the Manila Interzonal (1976) to play against Boris Spassky and Viktor Korchnoi in the 1977 Candidate matches. For an overview of these, see http://www.worldchesslinks.net/ezdo....

    Hans Suri, the father of the Biel Chess Festival was busy because parallel to the main event there were also 1) Internationale Blitzturnier (169 players, won by Oscar Panno), 2) Internationale Open (224 players, won by Dragutin Sahovic), 3) Internationale Open Meisterturnier (96 players, won by Radovan Govedarica), 4) Internationales Open Hauptturnier (139 players, won by Edgar Prang), 5) Internationales Open Allgemeines Turnier (126 players, won by Christian Flueckiger), and finally, 6) Jugendturnier (72 players, won by Murray Chandler).

    Tournament books: [[WM 76 Biel-Schweiz. Offizielles Turnierbuch]] by Janos Flesch and Alex Crisovan (Hans Suri/Hertig & Co. AG, Biel 1976. 160 pp.); [[Sakkvilágbajnokság 1976: Manila, Biel, Varese]] by Janos Flesch (Budapest 1979. 391 pp. (in Hungarian)).

    *[Several masters were not allowed by their federations to play in Barcelona 1975 because of the Franco regime. FIDE therefore added a 4-player playoff in Arandjelovac (1976), from which Smejkal qualified. And also Wolfgang Uhlmann, who went to the Manila Interzonal (1976). ] #[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped..., finished in 1966. ]

    [Original collections: Game Collection: Interzonals 1976: Biel by User: capybara and Game Collection: Biel Interzonal 1976 by User: Tabanus. Thanks to User: sneaky pete for understanding the qualification process (which was more detailed than presented here). ]

    190 games, 1976

  7. Biel Interzonal 1985
    The purpose was to select a challenger for the winner of the Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1985), or as it turned out (because of the rematch conditions, announced during the event on this page), the winner of the Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Rematch (1986). Four players from each of three Interzonal tournaments (= 12 players) would be joined by four seeded players in a "Candidates tournament" from which the most successful would qualify for Candidates knock-out matches. [(1)] In 1982 and earlier, the Interzonal players qualified directly for these matches, whereas a "Candidates tournament" had not been organized since the Curacao Candidates (1962) (where the winner went directly to the World Championship match). The three Interzonals of 1985 were: Tunis Interzonal (1985), Taxco Interzonal (1985), and Biel Interzonal (this page). FIDE had also ruled that the World Champion should defend the title every second year, [(2)] meaning that the next set of Interzonal tournaments would be held in 1987.

    Qualifying from the zonal tournaments were: Short from Brighton (1984), González from Barcelona (1985), van der Wiel from Montpellier (1985), Gutman from Beersheba (1985), Jansa from Prague (1985), Quinteros from Corrientes (1985), Sokolov from the USSR Championship (1985), Pétursson from Gausdal (1985), Li Zunian from the City of Laoag (1985), Seirawan from the US Championship (1984) and Rodriguez from Caracas (1985). [(3)] Vaganian and Polugaevsky were seeded by rating, [(3)] and so must have been Sax (whose rating in 1984 was much higher than in July 1985), Andersson and Ljubojevic. Torre was qualified from Toluca Interzonal (1982) in the previous cycle, and Partos represented the host country - after having won a qualification tournament ahead of Andreas Huss and Werner Hug. [(3, 4)] No less than 22 players (of the 3 x 18 = 54 who were qualified) requested to be allocated to a different, or specific, Interzonal. None was granted, [(5)] except Gutman and Saeed-Ahmed Saeed who switched places. [(6)]

    The main organizer in Biel was Hans Suri. As with Biel Interzonal (1976), the games were played in the Biel 'Congress House' (Kongresshaus, Palais de Congrčs). [(7, 8)] A number of distinguished guests attended the opening ceremony, including the ambassadors of USSR, Israel and Argentina and other diplomats. Dr. Lim Kok Ann represented FIDE. [(9)] The total budget, about half a million Swiss francs, was covered by the municipality of Biel and the canton of Bern (100,000 fr. each), a lottery (50,000 fr.), enrollment fees, and gifts. [(10)] The prize money was 50,000 fr., of which 15,000 fr. would go to the winner. [(11)] The GM norm was fixed at 11 points. [(11)] Playing time would be 2-7 pm, and 9-11 pm for adjourned games. July 4, 8, 13, 17, 22 and 24 were reserved for second time adjournments and July 9 and 18 for rest. [(11)] The appointed judge was IA Thomas Suri. [(11, 12)] When Round 1 started, on 1 July, there was a feeling that Biel was the strongest of the three Interzonals. The new FIDE rating list for July caused the tournament category to rise from 11 to 12. [(9)]

    Photo: http://www.lexpressarchives.ch/Repo...

    Former vice-World Champion Viktor Korchnoi predicted that Seirawan, Andersson, Ljubojevic, and a Soviet player would qualify. [(13)] Seirawan had arrived in Biel a week before the tournament to work 8-10 hours a day with Korchnoi as his coach. [(14, 15)] It was also whispered behind the scenes that the handsome Seirawan collaborated with the Yugoslav player Suzana Maksimovic, [(15)] who participated in a side event. Seirawan played well, was always among the top four, except after Round 10 when he lost to Polugaevsky. He became the first USA player to advance from an Interzonal since Robert Eugene Byrne in 1973. Andersson had been optimistic but could not convert his winning positions in rounds 1, 4 and 6 against Short, Quinteros and González; his 'safety first' style limited him to a modest 2 wins and 15 draws. [(16)] Ljubojevic also disappointed but had a chance to qualify until his exhausting draw against Pétursson (Round 11). The game lasted almost 15 hours [(17)] and finished on 22 July, the day before Round 16.

    Vaganian, Sokolov and Polugaevsky were accompanied by Mikhail Beilin and Arshak B Petrosian, [(15)] and could also help each other with adjourned games. Vaganian was the highest rated participant, after victories in Moscow (1982), Hastings (1982/83), Keres Memorial (1983) and Lvov (1984). Most onlookers admired his intuitive and gifted play. Andersson was less impressed, pointing to several games that could have been lost. [(16)] But it was clear that Vaganian’s style brought many full points, and his qualification was never in danger. He won his last two games, and the tournament. Sokolov was only 22, but had won the USSR Championship (1984) and placed 4th in the USSR Championship (1985). He had also won a team gold medal at the Olympiad in Thessaloniki (1984), and displayed excellent form in Biel, losing just one game in Round 8 against the Pirc Defense of the tournament's 'surprise player', van der Wiel. Drawing his last three games sufficed for direct qualification, as van der Wiel and Torre both lost their last round games. Polugaevsky also had a chance to advance, but suffered losses with White against Gutman (Round 2) and Quinteros (Round 14).

    The playing conditions were troubled by a severe heatwave, and sweat could be seen rolling down the faces of the players, despite the organizers maintaining that the temperature never exceeded 26°C. Unable to bear the discomfort, Short put on a t-shirt and shorts for his Round 10 game with Sax [(18)] and incurred the wrath of Florencio Campomanes, who was visiting the event. FIDE’s dress code sought more impeccable standards from the players, with the aim of impressing current and prospective sponsors. [(9)] Seirawan was consulted by Eric Schiller for his opinion. Always among the most smartly dressed, Seirawan was nonetheless surprised by the complaint and said that he might copy Short in the next round if the heat persisted. [(18)] Short’s second, Murray Chandler stated that Campomanes had no right to complain. The participants were not receiving any ‘appearance’ fee after all. A chorus of players soon took up Chandler’s line of reasoning as dress standards continued to fall. Ultimately, cooling off with a few evening beers was the only heat remedy. There was no air-conditioning, and just as the heatwave started, the swimming pool was closed. [(18)]

    After twelve rounds, the scores were Vaganian 9, Seirawan, van der Wiel and Torre 8, Sokolov 7.5, Ljubojevic 7 + one adjourned game (against Pétursson), Short and Polugaevsky 6.5, Andersson and Jansa 6. [(19)] July 18 was a rest day, and to recharge their batteries, the players were invited by the organizer to enjoy a mini-cruise with breakfast on board the boat Stadt Biel ("Ville-de-Bienne" [(20)]) (http://www.lacdebienne.ch/pictures/...). [(20)] Short had won in Round 11, made a draw in Round 12 with the French Defense, and continued after the boat trip with wins in rounds 13, 15 and 17. While some of the leaders were settling for draws, he had embarked on a run that gained him 5.5 points from his final 7 games. [(9)] As the last round started, it still seemed unlikely that he would advance. Not only did he need to beat van der Wiel, but Torre also had to lose to Sax. [(21)] In the end, fortune favored the Englishman. Torre (who was assisted by Lubomir Kavalek [(15)]) put up a Berlin Defense, but blundered just before the time control, and van der Wiel (aided by Gert Ligterink [(22)]) could not resist Short's attack. Short, van der Wiel and Torre ended =4th, and went on to contest a playoff for the last qualification spot. This was won by Short (see below).

    Amongst other notables in Biel were Sax's second Laszlo Hazai, [(15)] Rodriguez's second Reynaldo Vera, [(15)] and Pétursson's seconds Jon Loftur Arnason and Bragi Kristjansson. [(23)] Pétursson was the first Icelander in an Interzonal since the Stockholm Interzonal (1962). He gained the nickname [[The Marathon Man]] when he adjourned many games, some more than once, and set a record for moves played in an Interzonal. [(18)] The Spanish champion González had completed two months of rigorous training before the event. He was assisted by Jose Luis Fernandez Garcia. [(24)]

    <Biel/Bienne, Switzerland 1-25 July 1985>

    table[
    Elo* 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts S-B# CHF[(11)] 1 GM Vaganian 2625 * ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 12˝ 15000 2 GM Seirawan 2570 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 11˝ 10000 3 GM Sokolov 2555 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 11 7000 =4 GM Short 2575 0 ˝ ˝ * 1 1 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 10˝ 83.75 4000 =4 GM van der Wiel 2520 0 ˝ 1 0 * 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 10˝ 81.25 4000 =4 GM Torre 2535 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 10˝ 80.50 4000 =7 GM Polugaevsky 2600 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 0 ˝ * 1 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 9˝ 79.00 2000 =7 GM Ljubojevic 2615 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 * ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 9˝ 78.25 2000 =7 GM Andersson 2590 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 9˝ 77.00 2000 =10 GM Rodríguez 2505 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ * ˝ 1 1 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 8 63.75 =10 GM Sax 2535 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ * 0 0 1 0 ˝ 1 1 8 62.50 =12 GM Jansa 2480 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 * 1 ˝ 0 0 1 1 7˝ 57.75 =12 GM Quinteros 2525 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ 0 1 0 * 1 1 1 1 ˝ 7˝ 52.25 14 IM Pétursson 2550 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 * 1 1 ˝ ˝ 7 15 IM Gutman 2485 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 1 ˝ 0 1 1 1 0 0 * 1 ˝ 0 6˝ 16 IM Li Zunian 2465 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 0 0 * ˝ ˝ 6 17 IM Partos 2425 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * 1 4 18 IM González 2430 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 * 3˝ ]table

    E Torre vs Quinteros, 1985 (Round 1) was postponed and played on the adjournment day 4 July. [(9)]

    Playoff in Biel 29 July - 6 August 1985 (for games see Game Collection: Biel Interzonal 1985 table[
    1 Short 2575 *** 0˝0 111 3˝
    2 van der Wiel 2520 1˝1 *** ˝0˝ 3˝
    3 Torre 2535 000 ˝1˝ *** 2 ]table

    Short had a better tie-break score than van der Wiel in the Interzonal, and advanced, together with Vaganian, Seirawan and Sokolov, to the Montpellier Candidates (1985).

    The Biel Chess Festival (the overall event) also comprised a number of other tournaments, including the Masters Open I (1-10 July, 92 players), won by Ian Rogers, Anthony Miles and Florin Gheorghiu with 7/9 (Rogers' performance brought him his GM title), [(9)] Masters Open II (~ 13-24 July, 136 players), won by Alon Greenfeld with 9/11 ahead of Dragan Barlov (2nd), Gheorghiu (again!) and Eric Lobron (=3rd), [(25, 26)] Veteran's Open, won by Dragoljub Janosevic, [(27)] and Women's Open, won by Suzana Maksimovic. [(27)]. There were also two World Opens, a Junior Open, and other events, [(11)] with about 900 participants in all. [(18)]

    *From FIDE Rating List July 1985 (http://www.olimpbase.org/Elo/Elo198...).

    #Sonneborn-Berger scores from Mark Weeks at http://www.mark-weeks.com/chess/858....

    [1)] [Tidskrift för Schack, August 1985, p. 208. Three players would advance if Karpov won, four players if Kasparov won. ] [2)] [Roland Bannerman in The Times, 25 May 1985, p. 14. ] [3)] [Mark Weeks at http://www.mark-weeks.com/chess/zon.... ] [4)] [Nouvelliste et Feuille d'Avis du Valais, 5 January 1985, p. 3. ] [5)] [British Chess Magazine, June 1985, p. 245. ] [6)] [Based on lists by Helgi Olafsson in NT (Iceland), 20 April 1985, p. 12. ] [7)] [Le Matin (Lausanne), 2 July 1985, p. 6. ] [8)] [Older photo: http://www.memreg.ch/backend/memreg.... ] [9)] [British Chess Magazine, September 1985, pp. 369-374. ] [10)] [FAN L'Express (Neuchâtel), 20 June 1985, p. 23 (http://www.lexpressarchives.ch/Defa...). ] [11)] [Charles Partos in Le Matin, 11 May 1985, p. 24. CHF = prizes in Swiss francs. ] [12)] [Thomas Suri became an International Arbiter in 1983: http://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?.... ] [13)] [Nouvelliste et Feuille d'Avis du Valais, 10 July 1985, p. 2. ] [14)] [Oregonian (Portland USA), 27 June 1985, p. 50. ] [15)] [Nouvelliste et Feuille d'Avis du Valais, 17 July 1985, p. 2 (http://doc.rero.ch/record/196777/fi...). ] [16)] [Tidskrift för Schack, August 1985, p. 225. ] [17)] [FAN l'Express, 23 July 1985, p. 4. ] [18)] [Eric Schiller in CHESS, September 1985, pp. 154-160. ] [19)] [User: zanzibar at Zan Chess (https://zanchess.wordpress.com/2015...). ] [20)] [Marylin Grosjean in Le Matin, 19 July 1985, p. 9. ] [21)] [John Nunn in British Chess Magazine, October 1985, p. 418. ] [22)] [De Waarheid, 26 July 1985, p. 4. ] [23)] [Dagblađiđ Vísir, 29 June 1985, p. 10. ] [24)] [El Mundo Deportivo, 1 July 1985, p. 46. ] [25)] [L'Impartial (Neuchâtel), 9 August 1985, p. 11 (http://www.lexpressarchives.ch/Defa...). ] [26)] [Jaque 180, p. 456. ] [27)] [Jaque 179, p. 419. ]

    [Original collections: Game Collection: Biel Interzonal 1985 by User: suenteus po 147, Game Collection: 0 by User: zanzibar and Game Collection: Biel Interzonal 1985 by User: Tabanus. Round dates from Dutch and Swiss newspapers confirmed the schedule. Thanks to User: Paint My Dragon for paraphrased information from CHESS and BCM, and for improving the English. ]

    153 games, 1985

  8. Biel Interzonal Playoff 1985
    Four players from each of three Interzonal tournaments, the Tunis Interzonal (1985), Taxco Interzonal (1985) and Biel Interzonal (1985) (= 12 players) were to be joined by four seeded players for the new Candidates tournament in October 1985, from which the most successful would advance to Candidates knock-out matches. [(1)] The purpose was to select a challenger for the world champion, whether that be Anatoly Karpov or Garry Kasparov. In Biel, three players (Nigel Short, Eugenio Torre, and John van der Wiel) had shared 4th place. So a playoff was necessary, and it took place two days after the Interzonal ended. According to the regulations, if the playoff ended in a draw, Short would qualify because he had the highest score against the upper half of the players (in the Interzonal), while Torre had a preference over Van der Wiel because he won their mutual game. Therefore, Van der Wiel had to win an undivided first place to qualify. [(2)] Short got the most attention before the playoff, probably mainly because of his age (20 only), but there was more to it: "If he wins the play-off Short will become the first Englishman to qualify for the candidates' stage of the world championship." [(3)]

    Play was scheduled for Saturday 27 July at 2 pm, "in an almost deserted Palais des Congrčs", [(4)] and in a smaller hall than the Interzonal had been held. [(5)] Van der Wiel was assisted by Gert Ligterink, [(6)] and Torre was assisted by Lubomir Kavalek. [(7)] "Dr. John Nunn of London acted as Short's second". [(8)] Short had been assisted in the Interzonal by Murray Chandler, who had to leave for Edinburgh for the British Championship (starting on 25 July). Nunn was on the last day of the Interzonal in Amsterdam, waiting to play his final game in the OHRA tournament. That evening, he received a desperate phone call from Chandler, who asked him to relieve him of his duties. The British Chess Federation made arrangements for the "flying doctor", and as soon as he had finished his last-round game he flew from Amsterdam to Heathrow. There he was met by Robert Wade, who gave him files on Short's two opponents. Two hours later he was in the air again bound for Zürich and then Biel. [(9, 10)] "On my arrival I found the game over and Nigel in the bar." [(10)]

    [[Game 1]] had been lost by an unsuccessful French Defense (Tarrasch variation). [[Game 2]] was fairly even until Torre gave the exchange for a pawn. Van der Wiel was better, and could have played on, but took the draw after 24 moves. In [[Game 3]], "Nigel and I had prepared the system with Nc3, Nf3, h3 and Be3 as an anti-Pirc weapon. Unfortunately, I forgot to tell him to answer ...c6 with a4, so by move 25 Black already had a winning position ... However, Torre played the second session feebly", [(10)] and he was not able to hold the long rook ending two pawns down. In [[Game 4]], "our anti-Pirc prepararion worked much better, since Nigel obtained a very promising ending right out of the opening", [(10)] but unlike Torre, Van der Wiel held the rook ending two pawns down. [[Game 5]] was played on the Swiss national day, with the same opening as three weeks earlier (Van der Wiel vs E Torre, 1985). Torre deviated first (9...Bg4) and won again in 58 moves. In [[Game 6]], Torre gave a pawn for initiative, but did not find the best follow-up (22.Nh6+) and after 24.Kg1, Short took over. After six games: Short 2.5, Van der Wiel 2, Torre 1.5.

    <Wonderboys can also make mistakes>

    This was printed in the newspapers after [[Game 7]], in which Short defended with a Petroff. Van der Wiel first made an error in the opening, and got a hopeless position. [(6)] The players were then disturbed by a groaning noise through the fabric of the building. There was a tree outside which was firmly attached to the building by three metal rods, and the sound could be heard every time a gust of wind struck the tree. The sound had been heard before, but now the weather was deteriorating. Van der Wiel, who had protested at the sound earlier, declared that the game would have to be moved. The organizers moved it to another room. [(10)] At this point, picture taking was out of question. And not everybody was happy. How could the sounds from a tree cause such disturbance? "We know too much the escapades and the demands of certain champions of the world to still be surprised." [(11)] Short was still better in the game, and could have won had he found 31...f5! [(12)] Instead, after 31...Kb8? 32.Ne5 Rd8, Van der Wiel found a "sly" trick. [(6)] Both Nunn and Short missed


    click for larger view

    33.Nd7+! Kc8? (33...Rxd7! 34.Qe8+ Kb7 35.Qxd7 Ka6! =) 34.Rd6! 1-0

    This was apparently "A terrible shock for Black. 34...cd6 35.Qc6 mate, and otherwise 35.Qa8 mate. At long last, I have lived up to my reputation again of being a swindler .. I wonder, if Nigel will think back to the move in a lost moment some time." [(13)] Van der Wiel now lead by half a point with two games to go (him and Short against Torre), but he had to win [[Game 8]] to be sure of qualification. Whereas Torre had to win both his two last games to qualify. However, the game between them was adjourned (after 56...Rh4) in a drawn position. [[Game 9]] between Short and Torre had to be played before Game 8 could be finished, and since it was clear that Torre could only hope for a draw, Short had to win. And he did! The next day, it turned out that Torre had sealed "the only move, after 40 minutes of thinking (!), that gave Black no chance of winning." [(14)] Ten more moves followed, but at 2:34 pm, [(11)] Van der Wiel gave up his hopes. Torre apologized later - not for the fact that he had made a draw, but for his games with Short. [(14)] "And so was Nigel Short's persistency which he exhibited almost throughout the tournament rewarded with qualification for the candidates tournament. An important step in his already impressive career." [(2)]

    <Biel, Switzerland, 27 July - 6 August 1985>

    table[
    Age Elo* 123 123 123
    1 GM Short 20 2575 *** 0˝0 111 3˝
    2 GM Van der Wiel 25 2520 1˝1 *** ˝0˝ 3˝
    3 GM Torre 33 2535 000 ˝1˝ *** 2 ]table

    Short had a better tie-break score than Van der Wiel in the Interzonal, and advanced (together with Vasily Smyslov, Viktor Korchnoi, Zoltan Ribli and Boris Spassky, plus the top finishers in Tunis, Taxco and Biel interzonals) to the Montpellier Candidates (1985).

    At the British Championship in Edinburg, "Nigel Short arrived on the final day of play and was greeted by a huge ovation. He then proceeded to demonstrate some of his games from the Biel play-off which has made him England's first world championship candidate. It was amazing to see how many of them wound up being difficult rook and pawn endings. For analysing these brain-wrenching positions Nigel's new second, Dr John Nunn, deserves a great deal of praise." [(15)]

    "It is as if he (Short) has not sufficient concentration at the board unless something important." [(16)]

    "He has one big advantage over leading British chess players: resilience. In difficult positions he fights like a lion, and the endgame technique is good despite his young age. I predict no high ranking in the candidates tournament, but over time he could enter through." [(17)]

    Van der Wiel joined the 5th placed from the Tunis and Taxco Interzonals, Viktor Gavrikov and Jonathan Speelman, for the London Candidates Reserve Playoff (1985). Torre allegedly became disillusioned with chess after losing the Ribli - Torre Candidates Quarterfinal (1983). [(18)] But at the age of 66, he was still playing well.

    <Notes>

    [(1)] [[Tidskrift för Schack]], August 1985, p. 208.
    [(2)] Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam in [[New In Chess]], October 1985, pp. 22-23.
    [(3)] Harry Golombek in [[The Times]], 27 July 1985, p. 6.
    [(4)] [[Le Matin]], 27 July 1985, p. 5. Photo: http://cdn.simplesite.com/i/46/c1/2...
    [(5)] [[Nieuwsblad van het Noorden]], 29 July 1985, p. 12.
    [(6)] Alexander Jongsma in [[De Telegraaf]], 5 August 1985, p. T19.
    [(7)] Gert Ligterink in [[De Volkskrant]], 7 August 1985, p. 11.
    [(8)] [[The Times]], 8 August 1985, p. 1.
    [(9)] John Nunn in [[Illustrated London News]], 1 October 1985, p. 112.
    [(10)] John Nunn in [[British Chess Magazine]], October 1985, pp. 418-424.
    [(11)] [[L'Express]], 9 August 1985, p. 20.
    [(12)] Gert Ligterink in [[De Volkskrant]], 5 August 1985, p. 7.
    [(13)] John van der Wiel in [[New In Chess]], October 1985, p. 31.
    [(14)] Gert Ligterink in [[De Volkskrant]], 8 August 1985, p. 9.
    [(15)] Raymond Keene in [[The Spectator]], 17 August 1985, p. 38.
    [(16)] Jon Loftur Arnason in [[Dagblađiđ Vísir]], 17 August 1985, p. 10.
    [(17)] Helgi Olafsson in [[NT]] (Iceland), 17 August 1985, p. 9.
    [(18)] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen....

    *FIDE Rating List July 1985 (http://www.olimpbase.org/Elo/Elo198...).

    [Originals collections: Game Collection: Biel Interzonal 1985 by User: suenteus po 147, and Game Collection: Biel Interzonal Playoff 1985 by User: Tabanus. ]

    9 games, 1985

  9. Budapest 1928
    In the aftermath of Kecskemet (1927) good forces came together for another international event, this time at the famous [[Siesta Sanatorium]] in Budapest. Prize monies were 200 dollars (1st prize, from the New York publisher G. Wells), 800 Pengö (2nd prize, from the City of Budapest), 500, 300, 200 and 100 Pengö. Ten masters were invited, of which Milan Vidmar withdrew in the last moment (causing new schedule and pairings) and was replaced by Zoltan von Balla of Budapest. The former (1921-1927) World Champion Capablanca showed his class with 5 wins and 4 draws.

    The tournament was led by Geza Maroczy and chess editor László Tóth. It was followed up next year with Budapest (1929).

    A short summary in Wiener Schach-Zeitung Nr. 17/18 (Sept. 1928) p. 284 can be found online at http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a... (in German). Issue no. 19 (Oct. 1928) pp. 294-298 has three games of Capablanca annotated by Albert Becker (one with wrong round number).

    Final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
    1 Capablanca * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 7
    2 Marshall ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 1 6
    =3 Spielmann ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 0 ˝ 5
    =3 Kmoch ˝ 0 ˝ * ˝ 0 1 ˝ 1 1 5
    =5 Vajda ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * 1 0 ˝ ˝ 1 4˝
    =5 E Steiner 0 1 ˝ 1 0 * 1 0 ˝ ˝ 4˝
    =7 H Steiner 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 0 * ˝ 1 ˝ 4
    =7 Havasi 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ 1 4
    9 von Balla 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * ˝ 3
    10 Merenyi 0 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * 2 ]table

    Tournament book: [[A Siesta-Szanatórium Nemzetközi Sakkversenye]] by Géza Maróczy, Ferenc Chalupetzky and László Tóth (Magyar Sakkvilág, Kecskemét 1929. 71 pp.) (with an introduction by Capablanca). English version: [[The Siesta Tournament: Budapest, 1928]] by Walter Arpad Foldeak (Chess Player, Nottingham 2001. 43 pp.)

    [Round numbers and dates are here mainly based on reports in the newspapers Boston Herald (Associated Press), Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Hermann Helms, schedule for last 3 rounds) and New York Evening Post (Horace Ransom Bigelow). However, the tournament book's subtitle has October 1 as end date.]

    45 games, 1928

  10. Budapest 1929
    In 1839, Jozsef Szen founded the Budapest Chess Club (Pesti Sakk-kor), and 90 years later this was celebrated with a memorial tournament, as a follow-up of the success with Budapest (1928). As the year before, the former World Champion (1921-1927) Capablanca won. The tournament's round 5 coincided with game 1 of the Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Match (1929), and this took some attention away from it.

    Prize monies were 1500, 1200, 900, 750, 500, 400 and 300 Pengö (so that Vajda and Thomas each received 750 + 500 = 1250/2 = 625 Pengö). A special beauty prize went to Steiner for E Steiner vs Tartakower, 1929. The tournament was led by the retiring Geza Maroczy, and a summary in Wiener Schach-Zeitung Nr. 18 (Sept. 1929) pp. 273-276 can be found online at http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a... (in German).

    Final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
    1 Capablanca * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 10˝
    2 Rubinstein ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 1 0 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 9˝
    3 Tartakower ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
    =4 Vajda 0 ˝ 1 * 0 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 7˝
    =4 Thomas ˝ 0 ˝ 1 * 1 0 0 1 1 ˝ 0 1 1 7˝
    6 Steiner 0 0 1 0 0 * ˝ 1 0 1 1 1 1 ˝ 7
    =7 Colle 0 1 ˝ 0 1 ˝ * ˝ 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 1 6˝
    =7 Havasi 0 0 1 ˝ 1 0 ˝ * 0 0 1 ˝ 1 1 6˝
    9 Przepiorka ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 1 1 * ˝ 0 0 0 1 6
    =10 Canal 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 5˝
    =10 Monticelli ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 1 ˝ * ˝ 1 1 5˝
    12 Bosch 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ * 0 0 4˝
    13 Brinckmann 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 1 0 0 1 * 1 4
    14 Prokes 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 1 0 * 2˝ ]table

    Tournament book: [[Budapest székesfőváros nemzetközi sakkversenye Szén József emlékére, 1929, Abonyi István, Przepiorka D. és Tinsley E. S. bevezetéseivel]] by Geza Maroczy and Savielly Tartakower (Magyar sakkvilág, Kecskemét 1930, 136 pp.). German version: [[Das Internationale Szén-Memorialturnier zu Budapest 1929]] by Tartakower (Magyar Sakkvilág 1930, 108 pp.). There is also [[Das internationale Szén-Memorialturnier zu Budapest 1929 /​ in Bulletinform zusammengestellt]] by Hermann Zapf (Köln 1972).

    [Round numbers and dates are here mainly based on reading of reports in New York Evening Post (by Horace Ransom Bigelow), plus two reports in Brooklyn Daily Eagle (by Hermann Helms) and one (for rounds 1 and 2) in The Western Daily Press. ]

    91 games, 1929

  11. Budapest Interzonal Playoff 1979
    Three players from the Rio de Janeiro Interzonal (1979) and three from the Riga Interzonal (1979) would advance to the Candidates quarterfinal matches in March 1980. In Riga, Mikhail Tal and Lev Polugaevsky advanced, but the shared 3rd place between Adorjan and Ribli had to be decided by a playoff. This took place in Budapest, three weeks after the Interzonal. The condition was best of 6 games, or first to get 3,5 points. If tied at 3-3 the winner would be the one with better Sonneborn-Berger score in the Interzonal (Adorjan). [(1, 2)]

    Adorjan (28), Ribli (27) and Gyula Sax (27) lived within the same square kilometre in Budapest. [(3)] Before the match, Adorjan had defeated Ribli 2 to 0, with 10 draws. [(4)] Adorjan was "troubled with illness and interruptions" during the Interzonal [(5)] and the doctor there had permitted him a 14-day extension before meeting Ribli. [(6)] The experts gave Ribli the better chances, [(7)] and he was higher rated with 70 more Elo points. [(8)] The players were each entitled to two postponements during the match. [(2)] In Game 1, the position was even until Adorjan faltered in the double rook endgame just before the time control. Game 2 was a boring Symmetrical English. Adorjan could have played on, but offered the draw on move 15. In Game 3, he lost his isolated queen pawn on move 19. He had to play a rook ending a pawn down, until he resigned. When Ribli was leading by 2 points after the third game, everybody expected him to win the match. [(7)] Adorjan now postponed Game 4 until 29 October. [(2)] According to Bent Larsen, it was just his favorite postponement trick. [(9)] Or Larsen was unfavorable: Adorjan vs Larsen, 1979 had ruined his chance to run for the throne. Game 4 reached this position:


    click for larger view

    18.Bh6! Bf6 19.gxh7+ Kxh7 20.Bxg7 Bxg7 21.h6 Bf6 22.Qg2! 1-0. The diagrammed position and its variants was later published in many books and websites as an example of how to conduct such an attack, and how to avoid it. The game was a moral blow to Ribli. [(2)] But Adorjan still needed to win. He complicated matters in Game 5 with the King's Indian Defense (Panno Variation). Ribli could not find the right moves; Adorjan sacrificed the exchange to get a pawn and a dominant position on the queenside. Faced with two connected pawns, Ribli gave up on move 41. And now it was he who had to win! And with the black pieces. Ribli requested two days postponement before Game 6. [(10)] But it was not his day either. As time ran out with only two minutes to perform 16 moves, he offered the draw. [(2)] Adorjan naturally accepted.

    <Budapest, Hungary, 20 Oct - 4 Nov 1979>

    table[
    Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts
    1 GM Adorjan 2525 0 ˝ 0 1 1 ˝ 3
    2 GM Ribli 2595 1 ˝ 1 0 0 ˝ 3 ]table

    Adorjan advanced to the Candidates matches:

    Hübner - Adorjan Candidates Quarterfinal (1980) Polugaevsky - Tal Candidates Quarterfinal (1980) Portisch - Spassky Candidates Quarterfinal (1980) Korchnoi - Petrosian Candidates Quarterfinal (1980)

    Further reading: [[Interzonal tournaments. Riga -79. Rio de Janeiro -79]] by Viktor Ivanovich Chepizhny (Physical Culture and Sports, Moscow 1980. 415 pp.) (in Russian; covers the playoff).

    [1)] [Harry Golombek in The Times 17 November 1979 p. 13. ]

    [2)] [Laszlo Szabo in Jaque 97, p. 38 (http://www.bartelski.pl/olimpbase/l...). ]

    [3)] [Tidskrift för Schack, October 1979, p. 238 (http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo...). ]

    [4)] [Statistics by Chessgames.com. They have probably played some more games. ]

    [5)] [Tidskrift för Schack, October 1979, p. 237. ]

    [6)] [Evening Star (Washington) 11 Nov 1979 p. 62 (E-12). ]

    [7)] [Új Szó 16 November 1979 p. 7. ]

    [8)] [FIDE Rating List January 1979 (http://www.olimpbase.org/Elo/Elo197...). ]

    [9)] [Tidskrift för Schack, November 1979, p. 273. ]

    [10)] [De Waarheid 5 November 1979 p. 6. ]

    [Original collection: Game Collection: Budapest Interzonal Playoff 1979 by User: Tabanus. Game dates are from ChessBase (from User: Chessical). The dates of Games 1 and 4 are same as in Jaque 97 p. 38, and Game 6 date is same as in Új Szó 6 Nov 1979 p. 7. ]

    6 games, 1979

  12. Budapest Interzonal Playoff 1987
    In addition to five seeded players from the previous cycle, three players from the Subotica Interzonal (1987), three players from the Szirák Interzonal (1987) and three players from the Zagreb Interzonal (1987) would advance to the seven Candidates eighthfinal matches in 1988. In Szirák, Lajos Portisch and John Nunn had shared third place, and a playoff match between them was arranged. [(1)] This took place in Budapest, about 50 km SW of Szirák, 6-7 weeks after the Interzonal. It was best of 6 games, and in case of 3-3, Portisch would advance due to his better Interzonal tiebreak score. [(1, 2)] The match was sponsored by Hungaroil, Budapest Bank, Chemolimpex, Coopinvest and others, [(3)] so that though the FIDE rules did not require prize money for a playoff match, [(4)] the winner would get 140,000, and the loser 60,000 Hungarian forints. If 3-3, the players would get 100,000 forints each, [(5)] i. e. around 8,500 USD in 2019 value. According to Nunn, the conditions were much better than at Szirák. He was even given all the hotel room keys and invited to pick the room he liked best. [(4)] Many people took a keen interest. In addition to the television coverage, magazine and newspaper writers attended, and even the hotel staff were watching the games. [(4)]

    The playing venue was the Mátyás Hall of the Budapest Hilton Hotel, [(5)] where Game 1 was set to start at 3 pm on September 26th. [(6)] The game was preceded by a brief opening ceremony. [(7)] Portisch, who had Istvan Csom as his helper, [(6)] turned up alone, while Nunn was accompanied by his second Murray Chandler. [(7)] Nunn was offered a sparkling wine (to laughter from the audience), but he took a vitamin-rich refreshment instead. The players were welcomed by György Némedi, Director of the hotel, Sándor Szerényi, President of the Hungarian Chess Federation, and Tamas Tibor, Vice President of ÁISH (State Youth and Sports Institution). The photographers were on the podium for some minutes, until the chief arbiter Tibor Florian started the clock at 3 pm. [(7)] Both players were opening experts. According to Max Pam, Portisch was perhaps the best prepared player in the world, except from Garry Kasparov. "He has said he spends at least six hours per day on opening theory." [(8)] Portisch's knowledge became apparent already in Game 1, where Nunn surprised by playing his first ever Grünfeld Defense. [(4, 7)] After 1.c4 g6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bf4 Bg7 5.Rc1 (not played by Portisch since Portisch vs Sax, 1972 and Portisch vs W Schmidt, 1972) dxc4 6.e4 c5 7.dxc5 Qa5 8.Bxc4 O-O,


    click for larger view

    Nunn was prepared for 9.f3, but Portisch played a new move, 9.e5!, after which 9...Nfd7 10.Nf3 Nxc5 11.O-O Nc6 12.Nd5 Be6 13.b4! Nxb4 14.Nxe7+ Kh8 15.Bd2 Rad8 was not a good enough answer and he soon went down. [(4, 9)] On Game 2, Baruch Harold Wood noted that "Nunn's vast range of book titles testifies to his modern opening repertoire and theoretical grasp, so Portisch revives an old chestnut, the Berlin Defence." [(10)] Nunn was better prepared this time, and gained the advantage. He could have more or less decided the game in his favor on move 21 (21.Qg5), but was still better, until he chose to give an exchange by


    click for larger view

    27.Rxd6? Now, after 27...Bf8 28.Rxe6 fxe6 29.Nxe6 Bd6, Portisch was better. The game was adjourned when Portisch was winning [(7)] (apparently on move 54), and set to be finished the following day, [(7)] but Nunn resigned and Game 3 was played instead. [(11)] Down 0-2, Nunn was smiling as he sat down behind the black pieces. His opponent's match experience and thorough preparation was perhaps too much for him. After 26 minutes, he offered the draw (on move 14), which Portisch accepted. [(11)] The Englishman now had to win the next game. A draw would send him into the cold. Two days later, he arrived first for Game 4, grimly determined. [(12)] Portisch appeared a little later. The game was televised and the arbiter started the clock at exactly 3 pm. [(12)] In a main line of the Caro-Kann (the Classical Variation), Portisch made a new and solid move (14...Be7), and Nunn could not break through. Portisch had one chance to improve (with 24...e5), but he preferred to play it safe. With a time control of 2 hours each for the first 40 moves, Nunn had 5 minutes left on move 35. The draw was agreed on move 53. [(12)] At 3-1, Portisch was a Candidate for the eighth time in his career.

    The last two games were to be played as part of the prize-winning competition. [(12)] Sponsors and chess fans were probably more delighted about this than the players. Game 5 eerily resembled Game 3, with a draw agreed after 13 moves and half an hour. [(13)] The prize money forints could now have been distributed, but Game 6 was played two days later. It was witnessed by János Kádár, [(14)] the Secretary of the Central Committee of the Hungarian Socialist Workers' Party, who stayed for five hours, showing that he too was a big chess fan. [(4)] The game lasted no less than 68 moves and ended in a draw. There is a photo at https://telesport.cms.mtv.hu/wp-con... showing Kádár and some other notables watching the post-game analysis. [(15)]

    <Budapest, Hungary, 26 Sep - 3 Oct 1987>

    table[
    Age Elo* 1 2 3 4 5 6
    Portisch 50 2615 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 4 Nunn 32 2585 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 2 ]table

    Portisch advanced to the Portisch - Vaganian Candidates Eighthfinal (1988), as announced by the FIDE headquarters in Lucerne on October 5th. [(16)] Portisch and Nunn next played in Reggio Emilia (1987/88) and Hastings (1987/88), respectively.

    Match book: [[Hungaroil sakk világbajnok-jelölti páros mérkőzés]]. Hungarian Hydrogen Industry Research Institute, Budapest. 20 pp. (https://marvin.bline.hu/product_ima...)

    <Sources>

    [(1)] Mark Weeks' website (https://www.mark-weeks.com/chess/88...)
    [(2)] Gunnar Johansson in [[Tidskrift för Schack]], October 1987, p. 284 (http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo...)
    [(3)] MTVA Archívum photo (Game 1) (https://dev.archivum.mtva.hu/photob...)
    [(4)] John Nunn in [[British Chess Magazine]], December 1987, p. 514
    [(5)] [[Nógrád]], 26 September 1987, p. 11 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(6)] [[Pest Megyei Hírlap]], 26 September 1987, p. 11 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(7)] [[Pest Megyei Hírlap]], 28 September 1987, p. 7 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(8)] Max Pam in [[Trouw]], 17 October 1987, p. 31 (https://www.delpher.nl/nl/kranten/v...)
    [(9)] Robert Eugene Byrne in [[New York Times]], 3 January 1988 (https://www.nytimes.com/1988/01/03/...)
    [(10)] Baruch Harold Wood in [[CHESS Magazine]], Christmas 1987, p. 308
    [(11)] [[Pest Megyei Hírlap]], 29 September 1987, p. 7 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(12)] [[Somogyi Néplap]], 1 October 1987, p. 7 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(13)] [[Délmagyarország]], 2 October 1987, p. 6 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(14)] [[Dunántúli Napló]], 4 October 1987, p. 2 (https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/v... )
    [(15)] [[Sakkozó és operaénekes - Portisch Lajos 80 éves]]. In [[M4 Sport]]'s website, 4 April 2017 (https://www.m4sport.hu/2017/04/04/s...)
    [(16)] AP report in [[De Volkskrant]], 6 October 1987, p. 11 (https://www.delpher.nl/nl/kranten/v...)

    *FIDE rating list July 1987 (http://www.olimpbase.org/Elo/Elo198...)

    [Original collection: Game Collection: Budapest Interzonal Playoff 1987 by User: Tabanus. Game dates (from the Hungarian newspapers at https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/s... ): September 26, 27, 28, 30, October 1, 3. Game 5 was probably identical to Game 3, and is not included in CG database. Thanks to User: Paint My Dragon for information from British Chess Magazine and CHESS Magazine, and to User: OhioChessFan and User: Annie K. for helpful suggestions. ]

    5 games, 1987

  13. Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1978
    Right after the Buenos Aires olympiad (25 October - 12 November 1978), Miguel Najdorf had gotten the morning newspaper [[Clarín]] to disburse big bucks for this tournament. Its success allowed him to step it up with a larger budget for Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1979). The tournament was opened by BA Mayor Osvaldo Cacciatore* and play took place in the 3rd floor of the [[Banco de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires]]# at Esmeralda 660. Playing time was 5-10 pm. The room could take only a few spectators, but [[Clarín]] disposed several other locations with big demonstration boards, where the games were shown and explained to the press and public.

    According to the tournament book, the players were peaceful in the first rounds probably because of fatigue after the olympiad. However, competition hardened towards the end of the tournament. After 10 rounds it looked like Vaganian would win, but then he lost with White to the champion of China Qi Jingxuan in round 11. Then in round 12 it was Qi's turn to lose with White, to the tournament winner, the 27-year-old rising star Ulf Andersson from Sweden.

    The last round game between Dzindzichashvili and Qi Jingxuan was not played. Qi did not turn up and forfeited the point.

    Banco Ciudad, 14 November - 1 December 1978,
    final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 Pts Prizes 1 Andersson * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 9 5000 USD =2 Panno ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 8˝ 3167 =2 Smyslov ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 8˝ 3167 =2 Vaganian ˝ ˝ ˝ * 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 8˝ 3167 =5 Browne 0 ˝ ˝ 0 * ˝ 1 1 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 8 1900 =5 Gheorghiu ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 8 1900 =7 Dzindzichashvili ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 6 1500 =7 Najdorf ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 6 1500 9 Szmetan 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 5˝ 1200 =10 Quinteros ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 1 0 5 667 =10 Keene ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * ˝ 0 ˝ 5 667 =10 Qi Jingxuan 0 0 0 1 ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 5 667 13 Garcia Palermo 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 1 ˝ * ˝ 4˝ 500 14 Torre 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ * 3˝ 500 USD ]table

    Picture of participants: http://www.tabladeflandes.com/zenon...

    Tournament leader: Carlos Enrique Guimard, with FIDE representative Jorge Sanguineti as leader of the Appeals Committee.

    Tournament book: [[Internationales Schachmeisterturnier "Clarin" Buenos Aires 1978]] by Albert Becker (M. A. Lachaga, Argentina 1978, 60 pp.). There were daily reports in [[Clarín]], but only one is available online: http://najdorf-miguel.blogspot.no/s....

    [ Original collection: Game Collection: Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1978 by User: Tabanus. ] *[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osvald.... ]#[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_o.... ]

    91 games, 1978

  14. Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1979
    The event was sponsored by the newspaper [[Clarín]], and is also known as the [[2nd Clarin Tournament]]. It followed up the success of Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1978), and was continued next year with Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1980). The playing venue was Casacuberta Salon[1] of the Teatro General San Martín[2] in Buenos Aires, Argentina.[3] Together with pictures of Miguel Najdorf and Roberto Grau, the theatre had an exhibition of about 100 other objects, to commemorate the Buenos Aires olympiad in 1939 and the players who had decided to stay in Argentina during the War.[3] In addition to local players, the foreign masters included Spassky (ranked World #3), Larsen (#7), and Petrosian (#10). Tournament Director: Carlos Enrique Guimard. FIDE category: 11 (GM norm 7˝, IM norm 6, FM norm 4 points).[3]

    Participants: https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd....

    An impressive performance by 79-year-old Najdorf. For Petrosian (6 points only) the tournament was a kind of warm-up before the Korchnoi - Petrosian Candidates Quarterfinal (1980). "The great Danish master, Bent Larsen, didn't have a very successful 1979. He failed to make the Candidates' matches, scored only 50 percent at Tilburg (1979), and perhaps the worst blow of all, finished last at Montreal (1979). Dead last is not dead, though, and Larsen appeared fully recovered."[4]

    <Teatro General San Martín, Buenos Aires 26 Nov. - 14 Dec. 1979>

    table[
    Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 Pts 1 GM Larsen 2620 * ˝ ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 11 =2 GM Najdorf 2515 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 8 =2 GM Miles 2560 ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 8 =2 GM Andersson 2560 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 8 =2 GM Spassky 2640 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 8 =6 GM Gheorghiu 2540 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 7˝ =6 GM Ivkov 2525 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 7˝ 8 GM Quinteros 2545 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 0 0 * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 6˝ =9 GM Petrosian 2610 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 * 1 ˝ ˝ 0 1 6 =9 GM Panno 2545 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 * ˝ ˝ 1 1 6 =11 GM Lombardy 2520 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 0 5 =11 Franco 2360 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 * 1 ˝ 5 13 FM Tempone 2200 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 1 0 ˝ 0 * 1 3 14 IM Rubinetti 2430 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ 0 * 1˝ ]table

    Larsen receives the trophy: https://scontent-b-ams.xx.fbcdn.net...

    Tournament books: [[Los magistrales de Clarín I-II 1978-79]] (Buenos Aires 1980. 194 p.); [[Second Clarin Tournament. Buenos Aires 1979]] by Tony Miles (The Chess Player, Nottingham 1980. 56 p.); [[3 points' forspring]] by Bent Larsen (Samlerens Forlag, Copenhagen 1980. 128 p.). The Spanish book has round dates. There was no bulletin, but daily reports in [[Clarín]].

    [1)] [https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.... (picture from round 1). ] [2)] [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teatro.... ] [3)] [The Spanish tournament book. ] [4)] [Orlando Lester in Boston Herald 20 January 1980 p. 40. ]

    [Original collection: Game Collection: Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1979 by User: Tabanus. ]

    91 games, 1979

  15. Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1980
    The event was sponsored by the newspaper [[Clarín]] and is also known as the [[3rd Clarin Tournament]], following Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1978) and Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1979. About 1,000 people[1] attended the opening ceremony in [[Teatro Presidente Alvear[1, 2]]] where also the tournament was held.[3] Timman, Larsen, Karpov, Andersson, Hort and Kavalek had all played in Tilburg Interpolis (1980) which ended 2nd October. Category: 13. Prize money pot: 1,850,000 pesetas.[4]

    Teatro Presidente Alvear, Buenos Aires, 15 Oct. - 3 Nov. 1980:

    table[
    Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 Pts 1 GM Larsen 2585 * ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 1 9˝ 2 GM Timman 2600 ˝ * 1 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 9 3 GM Ljubojevic 2590 1 0 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 8 =4 GM Karpov 2725 ˝ 0 ˝ * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 7˝ =4 GM Andersson 2590 1 ˝ ˝ 0 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 7˝ =6 GM Najdorf 2510 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 7 =6 GM Hort 2595 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 7 =8 GM Kavalek 2600 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 0 1 1 6 =8 GM Ólafsson 2545 0 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 * 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 6 =8 GM Balashov 2600 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 6 11 GM Quinteros 2515 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 1 5˝ 12 GM Panno 2540 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ 5 13 GM Browne 2540 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ * ˝ 4 14 IM Giardelli 2300 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * 3 ]table

    Carlos Enrique Guimard was Tournament Director.[5] During and after the tournament the grandmasters held simultaneous exhibitions. The one held by Karpov after the tournament is mentioned here (try to read it): http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_T3uK8_azX...

    Pairings and round dates are from [[Clarin]] (thanks to User: Fusilli). The rounds were also covered in several Dutch newspapers (thanks to Timman), and in the Spanish newspaper [[El Mundo Deportivo]].

    [NOTES:] [1][El Mundo Deportivo 17 October 1980 p. 30. ] [2][http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teatro.... ] [3][El Mundo Deportivo 26 October 1980 p. 36. ] [4][El Mundo Deportivo 29 October 1980 p. 35. ] [5][Clarín 31 October p. 45: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_T3uK8_azX... ]

    [Original collection: Game Collection: Buenos Aires (Clarin) 1980 by User: Tabanus. ]

    91 games, 1980

  16. Buenos Aires (Konex) 1979
    The event was sponsored by Luis Ovsejevich and his Konex-Canon Company (since 1980: Konex Foundation*), and is also known as the [[2nd Konex Tournament]]. It came after the Buenos Aires olympiad in October-November (1978) and the following Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1978) tournament. Later in the year it was followed by Buenos Aires (Clarin) (1979).

    The russians boycotted# the tournament because Korchnoi was invited. Playing time was 5-10 pm with five games a week. Saturdays and Sundays were free days or days for adjourned games. Play was governed by a limit of 40 moves in two and a half hours and 16 moves per hour thereafter. Due to other obligations, Korchnoi played his last two games in advance, on 21 and 27 July. When the game Miles vs Ljubojevic, 1979 in round 12 ended in a draw, the tournament had two joint winners before round 13 started.

    Universidad de Buenos Aires, 12-30 July 1979,
    final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 =1 Ljubojevic * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 10˝ =1 Korchnoi ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 1 10˝ 3 Browne ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 =4 Liberzon 0 ˝ 1 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 7˝ =4 Miles ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 0 ˝ 1 1 1 1 0 7˝ =6 Najdorf 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 7 =6 Rubinetti ˝ 0 1 ˝ 0 0 * ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 7 =6 Quinteros ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ * 0 0 ˝ 1 1 1 7 =6 Diez del Corral 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 6 10 Emma 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 5˝ 11 Trois 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 1 5 =12 Szmetan 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 3 =12 Schweber 0 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ * ˝ 3 14 Bernat 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ˝ * 2˝ ]table

    Tournament leader: Dr. Renato Sanguinetti.

    Tournament book: [[Buenos Aires 1979. Sämtliche Partien des Konex-Canon-Grossmeisterturniers im Juli 1979]] by Albert Becker (Schwarz-Weiss Verlag, Bamberg 1982, 79 pp.). There were daily reports by Najdorf, Quinteros and Oscar Panno in the newspaper [[Clarín]], of which the first nine rounds are online at http://najdorf-miguel.blogspot.no/s....

    [ Original collection: Game Collection: Buenos Aires (Konex) 1979 by User: Tabanus. ] *[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konex_.... ] #[Info from User: Fusilli, who also gave the Najdorf blogspot link. ]

    91 games, 1979

  17. Buenos Aires 1939
    The [[Torneo Internacional del Círculo de Ajedrez]] was held in Buenos Aires, soon after the 8th Chess Olympiad, which was held from August 21 to September 19, 1939. All participants except Keres had decided to stay in Argentina due to the outbreak of World War II, and it was the opinion that chess would benefit from the realization of contests for them. After Rosario (1939) this was the second of these contests, where especially appealing was the great master Paul Keres. Play took place at the Círculo de Ajedrez, the main chess club in the city, at Bartolomé Mitre 670, with rounds starting as late as 8:30 pm. Najdorf and Keres tied for first place.

    Círculo de Ajedrez, 2-19 October 1939,
    final standings and crosstable:

    table[
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
    =1 Najdorf * 1 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 1 1 1 1 8˝
    =1 Keres 0 * 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 8˝
    =3 Czerniak 0 0 * 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 1 0 7
    =3 Stĺhlberg ˝ ˝ 0 * 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 7
    =5 Frydman ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 * ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 6˝
    =5 Guimard ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ * ˝ 1 1 1 1 1 6˝
    7 Grau 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ 0 1 ˝ 1 5˝
    8 Luckis 1 0 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ * 1 0 ˝ ˝ 5
    =9 Benkö 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 1 ˝ 3˝
    =9 Gerschman 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 1 3˝
    11 Graf 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 * 1 2˝
    12 Palau 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 0 * 2 ]table

    Tournament books: [[Torneo Internacional del Circulo de Ajedrez Octubre 1939]] by Miguel Czerniak (Buenos Aires 1946, 87 pp.); [[Rosario 1939 and Circulo de Ajedrez Buenos Aires 1939]] ed. by Juan Sebastian Morgado and Tony Gillam (Chess Player, Nottingham 2008. 76 pp.).

    [Original collection: Game Collection: Buenos Aires 1939 by User: Tabanus. ]

    66 games, 1939

  18. Champions Showdown 2017
    table[
    G/30 Nov 9 G/20 Nov 10 G/10 November 11 G/05 November 12 Nakamura ˝ 1 0 1 12˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 16 1 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 12 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ 1 21 61˝ Topalov ˝ 0 1 0 7˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 8 0 1 0 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 12 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 0 3 30˝ ]table

    table[
    Caruana 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 10 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 0 10 0 ˝ 0 0 1 1 1 ˝ 12 1 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 17 49 Grischuk 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 10 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 1 14 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 0 0 0 ˝ 12 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 7 43 ]table

    table[
    So ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 7˝ ˝ 0 0 1 0 ˝ 8 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 1 15 1 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 1 0 1 ˝ 1 0 17 47˝ Dominguez ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 12˝ ˝ 1 1 0 1 ˝ 16 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 0 0 9 0 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 1 0 ˝ 0 1 7 44˝ ]table -- table[
    G/30 Nov 11 G/20 Nov 12 G/10 November 13 G/05 November 14 Carlsen ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 12˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 18 0 1 1 1 1 ˝ 1 1 19˝ ˝ 1 0 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 ˝ 17 67 Ding Liren ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 7˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 6 1 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 0 4˝ ˝ 0 1 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 7 25 ]table

    120 games

    1 game, 2017

  19. Corus Group A 2003
    Rest days January 13, 17 and 22.

    Drawing of lots in Velsen-Noord January 10, Play set to start the next day at 1:30 pm

    1st prize 10,000 euros, Timan 250 euros

    Anand: former FIDE world champion (2000-2001)

    http://www.chessninja.com/dailydirt...

    Karpov vs Judit Polgar, 2003


    click for larger view

    16...Bb4+!

    Anand's third win in Wijk aan Zee, counting his shared wins in 1989 and 1998. Polgar 2nd, ahead of last year's winner Bareev in 3rd place.

    <Wijk aan Zee, The Netherlands, 11-26 January 2003> table[
    Age Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 1 Anand 33 2753 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 ˝ ˝ 8˝ 2 Polgar 26 2700 ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 8 3 Bareev 36 2729 ˝ ˝ * 0 0 1 1 0 1 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 7˝ 4 Shirov 30 2723 0 ˝ 1 * 1 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 ˝ 7 5 Van Wely 30 2668 ˝ ˝ 1 0 * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 0 0 ˝ 1 7 6 Grischuk 19 2712 ˝ 0 0 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 7 7 Ivanchuk 33 2699 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 1 7 8 Kramnik 27 2807 ˝ ˝ 1 0 0 ˝ ˝ * ˝ 1 ˝ 0 1 1 7 9 Radjabov 15 2624 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ * 0 ˝ 1 1 1 6˝ 10 Topalov 27 2743 0 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ 1 1 6˝ 11 Karpov 51 2688 0 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ * 0 1 ˝ 6 12 Ponomariov 19 2734 0 ˝ 0 0 1 ˝ 0 1 0 ˝ 1 * ˝ 1 6 13 Krasenkow 39 2633 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ * ˝ 4˝ 14 Timman 51 2594 ˝ 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 0 0 0 ˝ 0 ˝ * 2˝ ]table

    Category: XIX (2701). Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hsg...

    <Sources>

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_...

    Chess-Results (http://chess-results.com/tnr1093.as...)

    Official website (https://www.tatasteelchess.com/arch...)

    Chess.gr website (http://www.chess.gr/tourn/2003/coru...)

    Ajedrez ND website (http://ajedreznd.com/2003/corus.html)

    Szachowa Vistula website (http://szachowavistula.pl/vistula/c...)

    FIDE rating list January 2003 (http://theweekinchess.com/html/twic...)

    TWIC report 27 January 2003 (http://theweekinchess.com/html/twic...)

    [[Leidsch Dagblad]], 11 January 2003, p. 27 (https://leiden.courant.nu/issue/LD/...)

    [[Leidsch Dagblad]], 13 January 2003, p. 13 (https://leiden.courant.nu/issue/LD/...)

    Malcolm Pein in [[The Telegraph]], 17 January 2003 (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture...)

    Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam in NRC, 27 January 2003 (https://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2003/01/2...)

    [[Provinciale Zeeuwse Courant]], 27 January 2003, p. 21 (https://krantenbankzeeland.nl/issue...)

    Kjell Krantz in [[Tidskrift för Schack]], March 2003, pp. 148-156 (http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo...)

    Lubomir Kavalek in [[The Washington Post]], 27 January 2003 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/arch...)

    [Original collections: Game Collection: Wijk aan Zee 2003 by User: Chessdreamer and Game Collection: Corus Group A 2003 by User: Tabanus. ]

    91 games, 2003

  20. Corus Group B 2003
    1st prize 3000 euros (https://en.chessbase.com/post/wijk-...)

    <Wijk aan Zee, The Netherlands, 11-26 January 2003> table[
    Age Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 1 Zhong Zhang 24 2624 * 1 1 1 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 11 2 Stellwagen 15 2427 0 * 1 ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 8 3 Naiditsch 17 2585 0 0 * 1 1 1 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 1 1 0 1 8 4 Nijboer 37 2553 0 ˝ 0 * 0 0 1 1 ˝ ˝ 1 1 1 1 7˝ 5 Karjakin 13 2547 ˝ ˝ 0 1 * ˝ ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 1 0 7 6 De Vreugt 22 2504 0 ˝ 0 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 0 0 1 1 6˝ 7 Acs 21 2623 ˝ ˝ 1 0 ˝ ˝ * 1 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ 6 8 Van der Wiel 43 2509 0 1 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 0 * ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 6 9 Koneru 15 2496 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 ˝ * 1 0 ˝ 1 1 6 10 Rogers 42 2569 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 1 ˝ 0 * ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 5˝ 11 Hector 38 2570 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 0 ˝ 1 ˝ * ˝ ˝ 1 5˝ 12 Kosteniuk 18 2456 0 0 0 0 ˝ 1 1 0 ˝ 1 ˝ * 0 ˝ 5 13 Jonkman 27 2436 0 0 1 0 0 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 * 1 5 14 Cmilyte 19 2452 0 1 0 0 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 0 ˝ 0 * 4 ]table

    Category: XI (2525)

    <Sources>

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_...

    Official website (https://www.tatasteelchess.com/arch...)

    Chess.gr website (http://www.chess.gr/tourn/2003/coru...)

    Ajedrez ND website (http://ajedreznd.com/2003/corus.html)

    Szachowa Vistula website (http://szachowavistula.pl/vistula/c...)

    TWIC report 27 January 2003 (http://theweekinchess.com/html/twic...)

    Kjell Krantz in [[Tidskrift för Schack]], March 2003, pp. 148-156 (http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo...)

    [Original collections: Game Collection: Wijk aan Zee Group B 2003 by User: Chessdreamer and Game Collection: Corus Group B 2003 by User: Tabanus. ]

    91 games, 2003

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