chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Alexander Alekhine vs Oscar Chajes
Karlsbad (1911), Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) AUH, rd 13, Sep-07
English Opening: Agincourt Defense (A13)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 22 times; par: 43 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 1 more Alekhine/O Chajes game
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: All games have a Kibitzer's Corner provided for community discussion. If you have a question or comment about this game, register a free account so you can post there.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-21-04  notyetagm: Tactical demolition by Alekhine, from Seirawan's tactics book.
Dec-30-05  notyetagm: This game is a tactical tour de force by Alekhine.
Oct-07-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <17...Ba6> Nothing works:

I. 17...Qa5 18.Bd2...
II. 17...Qc5 18.Rc1...
III. 17...Qc4 18.Qa4...

Feb-11-07  crwynn: A bit of an openings mishap for Chajes, I think; Alekhine's 2.e4 was rather cheap I think, but it paid off with Chajes's too-straightforward attempt at fighting for d4 (4...g6, with an unpleasant structure that immediately runs into problems). Perhaps 4...Nd4 (even more straightforward!) is not so bad? Also 4...Nf6 5.d4 cd 6.Nxd4 Bb4 is okay for Black I think.
Jun-16-07  notyetagm: Position after 17 ♖a1-b1


click for larger view

<Gypsy: <17...Ba6> Nothing works:

I. 17...Qa5 18.Bd2...
II. 17...Qc5 18.Rc1...
III. 17...Qc4 18.Qa4...>

I simply adore this combination played by Alekhine, how it exploits the <ALIGNMENT> of the Black pieces in every variation given above.

<I. 17...Qa5 18.Bd2...> Exploits the <DIAGONAL ALIGNMENT> of the Black a5-queen and Black b4-knight with the <PIN> 18 ♗f4-d2:


click for larger view

<II. 17...Qc5 18.Rc1... > Exploits the <VERTICAL ALIGNMENT> of the Black c5-queen and Black c8-bishop with the <SKEWER> 18 ♖b1-c1:


click for larger view

<III. 17...Qc4 18.Qa4...> Exploits the <LATERAL ALIGNMENT> of the Black c4-queen and Black b4-knight with the <LATERAL PIN> 18 ♕d1-a4:


click for larger view

Note that Alekhine (White) saw that the <SKEWER> 17 ... ♕b5-c4 18 ♖b1-c1? does -not- work in this variation because Black has the <RUBBERBAND> 18 ... ♕a4-c6!.

Black's problems in this position all stem from the simple fact that his queen is both <PINNED> to the Black b4-knight as well as being the knight's <ONLY DEFENDER>. So in attempting to <UNPIN> the queen, Black must also keep her in contact with the Black knight in order to <DEFEND> it. Keeping the Black queen in contact with the Black knight results in either a <DIAGNONAL>, <VERTICAL>, or <LATERAL> alignment that White can exploit with a <PIN> or <SKEWER>.

A masterful tactical display by Alekhine in exploiting the forced <ALIGNMENT> of his opponent's pieces.

Dec-15-07  nionios: A very nice tactical game that required deep calculation from White's part!But it must be noted that Alekhine used some very good opening play to exploit his opponent's opening mistake(4...g6?).In fact the game was stratigecally won on move 7(7.Ndb5!) and Alekhine's tactical ability finished off the game!The move 13.b4 was brilliant and crowned Alekhine's excellent play by giving him a won position after a number of practically forced moves!
Jul-08-08  notyetagm: <nionios: A very nice tactical game that required deep calculation from White's part!But it must be noted that Alekhine used some very good opening play to exploit his opponent's opening mistake(4...g6?).In fact the game was stratigecally won on move 7(7.Ndb5!) and Alekhine's tactical ability finished off the game!The move 13.b4 was brilliant and crowned Alekhine's excellent play by giving him a won position after a number of practically forced moves!>

Alekhine simply overwhelming a weaker opponent.

Apr-07-11  aliejin: "Alekhine simply overwhelming a weaker opponent."

In this game black plays weak
but chajes was a good chessplayer ,
for instance two times won to capablanca

And by no means this is a simply
way to win

Sep-28-11  SeanBurdine: Alekhine's 13th move destroyed Chajes' position. After that it was all over but the shouting.
Feb-18-14  Poisonpawns: After 4..g6? are comments really necessary?
Feb-18-14  Morphized: Alekhine's tactical shot was pretty impressive indeed, but Chaje's terrible positional play made it much more simple:

4... g6?


click for larger view

Destroying the dark squares... Every dark diagonal is weak, since there are two dark squares pieces (the f8 bishop and the queen) covering 4 diagonals.

8... a6??


click for larger view

From this point, I'd say that the game is already positionally lost for several reasons:

1) Chajes gave up one of his two dark squares pieces, which is far from being enough to cover up everything.

2) After fxe5 axb6, the black knight on g8 will basically never manage to get into the play: h8 and f8 are under white's control, and Nge7 won't lead to anything, since c6, c8, g6, d5 and f5 are controlled by white. Moving the c8 bishop out with b6 and Bb7 with the idea of Ne7 and Nc8 doesn't seem to lead to anything either.

3) the new white pawn on e5 yields eternal control over the d6 square and prevents forever Chajes from playing d5.

By the way, Stockfish gives <+2,26> on move 11 with material equality, which is usually the synonym of an opening disaster.

I believe that black had to play f6 on move 11 in order to free his knight, instead of allowing this tactical destruction.

Of course, the rest of the game was very entertaining, but the said can be said about the the Opera Game: black's early mistakes made a spectacular win quite easier!

Aug-22-19  Mini Morphy: 21 Rook b8 wins!
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Gain time on queen while building a battery against the block
from Fight or Flight: Let's Test Their Metal by fredthebear
My Best Games by Alexander Alekhine
by LionHeart40
Round Thirteen
from Karlsbad 1911 by JoseTigranTalFischer
Alekhine 1908-1923
by Chnebelgrind
Game 7
from My Best Games of Chess (Alekhine) by brucemubayiwa
0mneuwirth Critical Games
by mneuwirth
Gain time on the queen and form a battery on the block
from Pick & Ch(l)oose Patch o' Berries fo Fredthebear by fredthebear
Game 7
from My Best Games of Chess (Alekhine) by SantGG
Pins!
from Yasser Seirawan's Winning Chess Tactics by Bears092
Art of War's favorite games 5
by Art of War
The Greatest!!
by Antiochus
p.157
from Games in Seirawan's Winning Chess Tactics by Pawn N Hand
GAME 7
from Alekhine - My Best Games of Chess 1908-1937 by StoppedClock
mesh of pins or x-rays
from ABC project by Gypsy
17 Rb1 Black b5-queen must both unpin -and- defend b4-knight
from Pinned/skewered + only defender = where to go? by notyetagm
GAME 7
from My Best Games of Chess 1908-1937 by smarticecream


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC